Haibike sDuro Hard Seven or Trekking

Discussion in 'Which electric bike should I buy?' started by Vennwood, May 13, 2015.

  1. Vennwood

    Vennwood Finding my (electric) wheels

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    16
    Well I'm almost there in deciding on which bike to get. I had come down in favour of the Haibike sDuro Hard Seven but have an opportunity to get the Trekking for around the same price. This represents a saving of some £500 I can't try the Trekking so have to take a leap of faith but was impressed with the Hard Seven. Does anyone have any knowledge of the Trekking and care to pass on any advice?
     
  2. Emo Rider

    Emo Rider Pedelecer

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2014
    Messages:
    659
    Likes Received:
    288
    Apples and oranges. They both are very tasty but very different. The hard seven is a mountain bike boardering on being being a jump bike. The trekking is a touring/commuter bike eqipped with mudguards, lights and a panier rack. Both have the great 400w Yamaha system and will deliver similar performance. The big difference is in the gearing and the suspension. The trekking has a wonderful 20 speed geat set and the hard seven a 9 speed gear set. The hard seven has nice SR Suntour air fork with remote lockout the trekking has basic suspension.

    I myself am trying to decide between the hard nine and the trekking. If only the trekking came with the rock shok rear syspension that is on the full nine. I'd pay the extra money. Bottom line is what you are going to use the bike for. The trekking will be great for year round commuting. The hard seven is a great recreational bike but could be kitted out for commuting as well.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Martin@e-bikeshop

    Martin@e-bikeshop Pedelecer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,015
    Likes Received:
    236
    Location:
    Surrey / Hampshire, UK
    This actually made me smile... Well done
     
  4. RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    4,329
    Likes Received:
    1,377
    The gearing on the trekking bike is a big attraction to me.

    You may not want 20 gears, but you will almost certainly be very glad of the extra range.

    One of the reasons for buying a crank drive bike is to get an assisted rendition of ordinary cycling.

    I like to spin up hills in a low gear, which is not so easy with only a big ring at the front.

    Lower gears also enable you to put a bit more effort in and not resort to highest power for climbing - less battery use giving you more miles.

    None of these motors are that strong, so you might even struggle on really steep stuff with the nine speed bike.

    Your planned use is critical.

    The shallow tread tyres on the trekking bike will be fine on road, cinder tracks and well made paths.

    They are good against punctures, but the hard compound makes them skittish on light mud.

    Some of the trails near me are still wet in places, making them hard work on a trekking bike.

    Full close fitting mudguards are great on the road in the wet, but they clog in no time in mud.

    Changing the tyres for better traction is an option, but you may struggle with clearance.

    You could remove the mudguards, but I can all but guarantee the wiring for the back light will be under the rear guard, so taking it off is not straightforward.

    Despite these reservations, I would go with the better overall spec of trekking bike.

    Grippier tyres could be sorted somehow.

    But if you have any inclination to go more off road than an ash path, get the mountain bike.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Vennwood

    Vennwood Finding my (electric) wheels

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    16
    Well laid out analogy I hadn't looked at it in that light. When you say different gearing (apart from the 9 verses 20 gears) what other differences are there? I'm not into real off road biking but more of a leisure biker with the odd off road thrown in. We do mainly canal paths and cycle tracks that do do venture up into the hills but not heavy stuff and mostly in France.

    Any other thoughts ???
     
  6. Vennwood

    Vennwood Finding my (electric) wheels

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    16
    Thanks for that - I think it has made my mind up and the Trekker is most likely the one for me
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Emo Rider

    Emo Rider Pedelecer

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2014
    Messages:
    659
    Likes Received:
    288
    With what you have said the trekking is definitely the bike for you. At that price a true bargan as well.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. ricoghardforth

    ricoghardforth Finding my (electric) wheels

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2014
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Rotherham
    Hi
    I'm also thinking haibike hardseven or the trecking.
    The hardsevn sduro sl can be had from my local haibike dealer for £1850 but I've found this guy on ebay who sells them new apparently with manufactures warranty which can be set up with your local dealer for £1550 which is £300 cheaper.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/141658750383?euid=f4555531a3eb45d9b06f5a6c53be52a3&cp=1

    I've emailed him and he can also do the sduro trecking rx for £1699 where as my local dealer has them on their website for £2400 which is massive saving of £700.

    This deal appears to good to be true.

    Opinions please.

    Thank you.
     
  9. RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    4,329
    Likes Received:
    1,377
    He can't spell pedal, assist, and used the wrong 'discreet'.

    I gave up after 20 words.

    Seriously, looks like he is selling bikes imported directly from continental Europe.

    Nothing wrong with that, some bikes are cheaper over there.

    If he has the right bike for you - in the right size - in stock, the transaction will probably proceed smoothly.

    I would be reluctant to order a bike, not because you won't get it at some point, but even a full price premium ebike order from an appointed UK dealer can take months to fulfil.

    The Bosch and Yamaha motors are reliable as far as I know, but your local dealer may not be so helpful if you need to make a warranty claim on an imported bike.

    Not worth the possible hassle for a couple of hundred, but if the savings are more than that it may be a risk worth taking.

    Have you asked your local dealer for a discount?

    They might not be able to match the £1,550 for the £1,850 bike, but if they meet you half way, why mess about with a remote transaction?
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Vennwood

    Vennwood Finding my (electric) wheels

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    16
    This is the trader I've been speaking to and I have to say he has been up front on every question and he gets back to you promptly. He doesn't deny he is importing them - and in the case of the Trekking the savings are substantial like £700. That said he isn't the only one on Ebay with this guy selling direct from Germany.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/111652786306?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&var=410664408728&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT

    Over the years I have bought several items direct from Europe, Germany in particular and had no problems whatsoever. In fact some have been delivered quicker than UK sellers. In short if you pay through PayPal you have protection against non delivery if you use the pay after delivery option and if you are saving up to £700 then - well that's each individuals decision. It does disappoint me though when UK dealers appear to be creaming in on both dealer margins AND exchange rates. These guys are still selling at full retail but leaving any currency exchange benefits to the buyer.

    More of a worry for me is the drive - Yamaha or Bosch - it seems that every manufacturer is switching (or choosing) Bosch and wonder if that will be a problem down the line regarding spares etc. Does anyone have any thoughts on which is the better option for both power and ease of maintenance?
     
    #10 Vennwood, May 16, 2015
    Last edited: May 16, 2015
  11. Vennwood

    Vennwood Finding my (electric) wheels

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    16
    My only comment on the Hard Seven he has is that he only has one size - 55cms - I think that may be too big for me to be fully comfortable on. The Trekking is 52cms - exactly my size. FYI the other dealer from Germany says delivery is approx. two weeks
     
  12. RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    4,329
    Likes Received:
    1,377
    The Hard Seven in the link is on 650b tyres - 27.5" wheels - which will make it feel smaller than a 29er in the same frame size.

    Most of the German trekking ebikes I've seen are 29er, so the 52cm bike may come up about the same size as the 55cm Hard Seven.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Vennwood

    Vennwood Finding my (electric) wheels

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    16
    Hi RobF - good point. Its just that the test ride I had was on the 52cm and thought that was right for me and I can't test the 55cm as it wasn't available. I never looked at the different wheel sizes. What about Bosch v Yamaha - any thoughts?
     
  14. Emo Rider

    Emo Rider Pedelecer

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2014
    Messages:
    659
    Likes Received:
    288
    Ask your shop owner how happy they would be to do your warranty work on a bike they did not sell. If one rolled into my shop I would be telling that person to contact the supplier for assistance. It's fine to advertise that a dealer will honour the warranty but reality may be quite different.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. ricoghardforth

    ricoghardforth Finding my (electric) wheels

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2014
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Rotherham
    Its the warranty concerns for me which is keeping me from using this eBay importer. No guarantee this eBay seller would be about in 8 months time if the battery of electronics died and should like some confirmation that if I took it to my local Haibike dealer with an import they would help you at all. Would haibike consider an unaficial ebay importer the first buyer so in essence they see you as buying it second from them and therefore have no warranty with them at all.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Vennwood

    Vennwood Finding my (electric) wheels

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    16
    You raise good points guys but I'm now confused. Are you saying that as a dealer (Emo Rider) you wouldn't accept any warranty repair if the bike wasn't purchased from you? What about if I bought from you but broke down in France for example (quite likely in my case as I have mentioned on other posts most of our riding is in France) are you saying that no French dealer would honour the warranty because it was purchased in UK? or visa versa?

    Aren't we all in the EEC - we are not talking about a Far Eastern import here. If what you say is true then any Haibike warranty is almost worthless unless you buy and ride within striking distance of original purchase. One of the sellers on Ebay is a German official Haibike dealer
     
  17. RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    4,329
    Likes Received:
    1,377
    I've only had a brief go on the Yamaha, so am unable to make a valid comparison.

    I like the refined and easy to live with nature of the Bosch.

    Mine has been ridden by a couple of bike dealers who had previously only tried hub bikes.

    Both commented along the lines of "That Bosch is what an ebike should be like."

    From what I can gather, the Yamaha is similar in that respect.

    The Yamaha is supposed to have a bit more poke, but that wouldn't be an attraction to me because I rarely use full power on the Bosch.

    Quite the reverse, I ride at low assistance levels, partly to get distance from the battery.

    The Yamaha has only three assistance levels, that would concern me a little in terms of fine tuning the assistance to achieve the most miles.

    There is also an impact on speed, I naturally ride faster in 'sport' than 'tour'.

    So it's rather like gears, the more ratios you have the better - within reason.

    Four modes on the Bosch is about right, although I sometimes wish I had another between tour and sport.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Emo Rider

    Emo Rider Pedelecer

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2014
    Messages:
    659
    Likes Received:
    288
    If someone from France on holiday were to come in, of course we would do what we could. Having said that, if they required parts we did not have then I doubt they would wait. If we did have parts we could exchange with Raleigh, we would still charge labour. Look at it this way, if we repaired Mr eBay's bike we would be using valuable shop time. Time that we realized no profit from in the first place. Would you or your place of work work for nothing? What kind of shape would a bike shop be in if they spent their time fixing eBay bikes for free?
     
    #18 Emo Rider, May 16, 2015
    Last edited: May 16, 2015
    • Like Like x 1
  19. rdgoforth

    rdgoforth Just Joined

    Joined:
    May 16, 2015
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    4
    So I take if the bike business is not like the car business then. You buy a car from a dealer if say if your gearbox fails you take it back to either the dealer you bought it from or another one who deals with same manufacturer if it's still under warranty. the dealer replaces or repairs gearbox and the dealer gets paid for their labour and parts by manufacturer.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    4,329
    Likes Received:
    1,377
    The more I learn about it, the more I realise the bike business is not like any other business.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    • Like Like x 2
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice