15mph?

fatboytrig

Pedelecer
May 3, 2011
56
0
Stupid question, but how fast is this? I mean, I drove in my car, 15mph up a hill and it felt very slow.

In reality, what does it really feel like?

Also, If I get myself this new 2011 model Powabyke x24, which I am seriously considering... can I get it de-restricted and if so, what are the consequences? Battery life, prison e.t.c.

Will 15mph up quite long hills really make that much of a difference to me than riding my TREK Navigator...? Will it knock off loads of commute time? Currently at around 40 minutes.

I know this is a stupid thread to start, just interested in hearing from experienced riders on speed perception e.t.c.
 

kitchenman

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 9, 2010
1,309
7
Aberaeron, West Wales
I have a 15 mile commute. I have been doing it on my CX700 since last July. My average speed over this period is between 17 and 18 mph. Average time to work is between 52 to 54 mins. A couple of weeks ago I commuted on an un-assisted CANNODALE tourer. Average speed was between 13 and 14 mph and average time between 65 to 67 mins. So, I was spending 20 mins a day longer in the saddle and having to fight my way up the hills.
I am now back on my CX700
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
Will 15mph up quite long hills really make that much of a difference to me than riding my TREK Navigator...? Will it knock off loads of commute time? Currently at around 40 minutes.
15mph is a nice compromise between speed and battery life. You should think of an electric bike as a means of stopping you from going slow rather than helping you to go fast. Use the power to help you up the hills and into those fierce head-winds, then cycling becomes a lot more enjoyable and increases your average speed. I think that's the concept. If you want to go faster, you end up with huge heavy batteries and motor, which destroys everything good about cycling. It's a lot easier and cheaper to get a petrol automatic 50cc scooter - even allowing for tax and insurance. You'll go fast, be more comfortable and safer.
It's unlikely that you'd be cauight if you had an illegal more powerful electric bike, but, if you had an accident, regardless of who's fault it is, you'd be held to blame and could end up paying for the rest of your life.
 

fatboytrig

Pedelecer
May 3, 2011
56
0
Thanks all, this is great support and advice! I can't wait until I get mine!!!
 

eddieo

Banned
Jul 7, 2008
5,070
6
If you have a bike you are happy with why not get a kit?
 

banbury frank

Banned
Jan 13, 2011
1,565
5
Hi I agree

Look at the Ezee Kit I would recommend a rear motor

As the suspension forks can be damaged by a strong motor

You have a nice bike just Electrify Him


Long live the Electric Bike


Frank
 

fatboytrig

Pedelecer
May 3, 2011
56
0
Thank you for this.
There are several reasons I am not going for a kit. Did actually consider it but..

1. I can get the entire thing cheaper via the ride to work scheme.
2. The entry level kits are not far off the same cost of a bike anyway.
3. I get a spare bike :) for the pub!!!.... hic
4. The last time I tried to do something practical (constructing bunk beds for my kids), I drilled into the palm of my own hand. I fear that despite being able to call the supplier for help over the phone whilst trying to fit it, I doubt they would somehow put up with me sobbing uncontrollably for hours, only to realise I have managed to fix the entire cycle to the patio floor, along with my right arm.

So, in short, I am useless and need to fund it through r2w... sorry.
 

kitchenman

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 9, 2010
1,309
7
Aberaeron, West Wales
I drilled into the palm of my own hand....
I once nailed myself to an 8 foot piece of wood while at home alone with 2 small kids. Couldn't get to the front door so had to talk my son into getting his little red chair to stand on so he could open the front door to the ambulance men. However, I have moved on since then and I do learn from my mistakes (I haven't nailed myself to anything since then!) so I am determined to get a kit and have a go. I wonder how many people there are like me? ... I think I'll start a new thread and find out ...
 

banbury frank

Banned
Jan 13, 2011
1,565
5
Hi

Be aware off the ride to work scam the new government have changed the rules making the Scheme virtually useless

By the way that is not a spelling mistake I meant SCAM

Just make sure you buy local with suport

if you give the forum your rough location i am sure members will recommend from there experience somewhere near you

Frank
 
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fatboytrig

Pedelecer
May 3, 2011
56
0
Hi

Be aware off the ride to work scam the new government have changed the rules making the Scheme virtually useless
OK, would like to hear more about this but I am restricted to going with Evans. I did it a couple of years ago and got my trek, which I am very happy with and I thought the scheme was good but why a scam?
It's a very good scheme, which allows you to spread the cost and make tax savings, where's the bad?
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
47,794
25,310
Stupid question, but how fast is this? I mean, I drove in my car, 15mph up a hill and it felt very slow.

In reality, what does it really feel like?

Will 15mph up quite long hills really make that much of a difference
The only unpowered cyclists who ride consistently above 15 mph are the drop-handlebar brigade. Riders with flat or comfort handlebars are usually well below, often around 12 mph, mainly due to wind resistance. Therefore 15 mph does feel a good speed as long as one helps a bit with the pedalling, seeming to be a good return for the effort. Oddly though, if riding a powerful e-bike on throttle only and not pedalling, 15 mph seems slow and boring.

Forget about riding up hills of any steepness at 15 mph on legal e-bikes. Maximum torque for climbing is nearer half that, so you will often be going up hills much slower, unless they are very gentle ones.
 

kitchenman

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 9, 2010
1,309
7
Aberaeron, West Wales
Forget about riding up hills of any steepness at 15 mph on legal e-bikes. Maximum torque for climbing is nearer half that, so you will often be going up hills much slower, unless they are very gentle ones.
Some evidence: I have what I consider to be a steep hill at the start of my commute. Un-assisted its 5 mph and pumping hard and stars ... with my mere 180 watt front hub motor I can double this. Never got up it doing 15 mph! ..
 

morphix

Esteemed Pedelecer
Oct 24, 2010
2,163
119
Worcestershire
www.cyclecharge.org.uk
Stupid question, but how fast is this? I mean, I drove in my car, 15mph up a hill and it felt very slow.

In reality, what does it really feel like?

Also, If I get myself this new 2011 model Powabyke x24, which I am seriously considering... can I get it de-restricted and if so, what are the consequences? Battery life, prison e.t.c.

Will 15mph up quite long hills really make that much of a difference to me than riding my TREK Navigator...? Will it knock off loads of commute time? Currently at around 40 minutes.

I know this is a stupid thread to start, just interested in hearing from experienced riders on speed perception e.t.c.
For me, 15mph is a reasonable speed on a bike, particularly if you're not pedalling. Although my bike is capable of doing 18-20mph at full power with light pedalling and the extra 3-5mph really does make a noticeable difference. I can cover a lot of ground in much less time than it would take me unpowered. It feels really exhilarating. Hills are effectively flattened I just go up them without effort.

I personally think 18mph is about the maximum safe limit on an pedelec and you wouldn't want a bike that goes faster than this really for a number of reasons. The faster a bike goes the more difficult it is to handle and control, and the higher the risk of an accident. You also have to remember that many will use ebikes on pavements and in built-up areas where there's a higher risk of collision with pedesterians and other cyclists. So I personally think the 15.5mph legal limit on ebikes is a sensible one.

The other thing of course is that if you have an illegal bike capable of much faster speeds with a bigger capacity motor, it's probably going to be much heavier and not look like a normal pedal bike. It's also going to use up battery power much more of course and need a bigger, more expensive battery.

When I first got interested in ebikes and was looking at what to buy, I had the mindset of "fast as possible" but when you're riding one it's very different. I don't commute to work on mine, so I suppose if you were buying a bike primarily to commute and you wanted to cut your journey time down as much as possible I can perhaps understand "the need for speed" but if you're going for an all purpose normal bike, I think you'd be more than happy with a 250W 15mph restricted bike.
 

Jon

Pedelecer
Apr 19, 2011
182
0
Stoke on Trent
www.tangit.co.uk
For what its worth, 15mph is different depending where you are. On a long road it feels nice and consistent but when im off road on dirt tracks etc it feel very fast and thrilling.