Build my first ebike

robsbike

Finding my (electric) wheels
Nov 21, 2020
6
0
At the first I almost bought an escooter. But I realized that's cannot be trusted if the battery dies.
Ebike comes more practical if the electronic dies.
I need a bike to commute 12miles/day.
With regular bike and speed takes me about 25-30 mins. But I'm a very sweaty person, so once I get there I'm soaked. I don't want yo work 8 hours in my sweat.

So the bike I want to build is not really for speed, more like help me out a bit.
My bike is a Muddyfox 26" mtb with front suspension.

I have attached the pictures about the specs I want to use.
Could you add anything to it?
I don't really know if that's good enough or not.

Thanks, much appreciated.
 

Attachments

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
6,903
2,663
Basildon
We get about 2 similar posts per week - always with the same sort of kit, and always the advice is the same. Forget it, and get a kit that will make your bike into a convenient and pleasant ebike.

Show a photo of your Muddy Fox and tell us why you think you need a 30 mph 1000w kit.

 
  • Agree
Reactions: sjpt

harrys

Pedelecer
Dec 1, 2016
170
22
69
Chicago, USA
I'm wondering if his 12 mile commute in 30 minutes means 6 miles one way at 12 mph, or 12 miles one way at 24 mph. Even the first one is a commuting accomplishment, given traffic and traffic stops, while the latter is astounding by my standards.

And if it is the latter, then he does need a 1000W direct drive to do it. We're then looking at 20-25wh/mile and with that 500WH 48V battery, he risks running low on power coming home, but that should be OK.

Anyway, no experience with 1000W kits, even though they are plentiful and inexpensive here in the USA. As low as $150 a few years ago. Never wanted one.
 

robsbike

Finding my (electric) wheels
Nov 21, 2020
6
0
We get about 2 similar posts per week - always with the same sort of kit, and always the advice is the same. Forget it, and get a kit that will make your bike into a convenient and pleasant ebike.

Show a photo of your Muddy Fox and tell us why you think you need a 30 mph 1000w kit.

I don't really need 1000w. I only found that on website but in reality 500w would be more than enough.
 

robsbike

Finding my (electric) wheels
Nov 21, 2020
6
0
I'm wondering if his 12 mile commute in 30 minutes means 6 miles one way at 12 mph, or 12 miles one way at 24 mph. Even the first one is a commuting accomplishment, given traffic and traffic stops, while the latter is astounding by my standards.

And if it is the latter, then he does need a 1000W direct drive to do it. We're then looking at 20-25wh/mile and with that 500WH 48V battery, he risks running low on power coming home, but that should be OK.

Anyway, no experience with 1000W kits, even though they are plentiful and inexpensive here in the USA. As low as $150 a few years ago. Never wanted one.
12mh is not my stable speed, can do when I'm fresh before work. But afterwards I'm drained when I go home. I don't want riding 40mins in night and cold.
 

sjpt

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 8, 2018
1,947
1,379
You don't need 500w either (at least not 500w nominal). A legal 250w will actually be delivering nearer 500w on the hills (some a bit less, some quite a bit more). If you are happy with a legal assisted 15.5mph you will do the 6 miles in around 25mins, with very little effort from you if you use high assist.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
11,952
4,634
57
West Sx RH
A geared hub will supply up to 1kw of temporary power with out to much problem ( dependant on controller current), even 15 -17a will give you 500w of power which is plenty for every one on relative flat commute.
Georgehenry might chip in if he reads this thread, he does late shift work and often rides home on his 250w £100 super sub bike.
My 250w 700c hub bike will comfortably tootle long at 18 -20mph, the D/D options have cheap crappy electronics. Ideally you need hub motor couple with a KT 15a controller/lcd @48v or about 20a @36v.
 

robsbike

Finding my (electric) wheels
Nov 21, 2020
6
0
A geared hub will supply up to 1kw of temporary power with out to much problem ( dependant on controller current), even 15 -17a will give you 500w of power which is plenty for every one on relative flat commute.
Georgehenry might chip in if he reads this thread, he does late shift work and often rides home on his 250w £100 super sub bike.
My 250w 700c hub bike will comfortably tootle long at 18 -20mph, the D/D options have cheap crappy electronics. Ideally you need hub motor couple with a KT 15a controller/lcd @48v or about 20a @36v.
Well if I could go a bit faster in that wouldn't be bad. But honestly I wouldn't go at 25mph on the path, it's not funny I guess.
15-20mph is good enough to me.
My goal is to get there in 15mins approx.
If 250w can do that to me it's a perfect bike.
I will send pics about my donor bike today.
Thanks for all replies.
Helping me a lot.
 

harrys

Pedelecer
Dec 1, 2016
170
22
69
Chicago, USA
15 minutes for 6 miles. Back to 24 mph again. You can do that with 500W, but you will be bushed. It's an easy 30 minute ride at 12 mph with most any pedelec.
 
  • Agree
Reactions: sjpt

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
6,903
2,663
Basildon
It should be very east to convert that bike. It has the perfect layout. Choose a motor that has a max rpm 1.2 - 1.3 times your planned modal speed. 36v 15A for 15 mph, 17A or 20A for 20 mph, or 48v 15A for 20 mph. Cassette motor for 8 speeds plus of free-wheel motor for 7 speeds or less.