CO2 Tyre Inflators

Ian

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 1, 2007
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Leicester LE4, UK.
Has anyone out there ever used one, they seem a light and small alternative to carrying a pump for emergency use, also potentially a lot easier and quicker to use.

I was wondering whether a CO2 cartridge has enough gas for a typical fat leccy bike tyre, if there's a need to carry several cartridges it would probably defeat the object.

Ian.
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
44,208
20,372
I carry these with my Quando for the sake of compactness Ian. As stated on my site, they claim to fill the tyres to about 30 lbs. The only time I've tried one on the road was when out with the Quando, I came across a mother and young son struggling along, with the son cycling a flat front tyre. I fixed it for them, and after inflation the 20" tyre on his small bike was easily at over 30 lbs judged by feel. The magical thing to the lad was the instantaneous inflation, I became an instant superhero! :D

Had to be worth the price of a cylinder. :)

Here's the item on my site.
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Ian

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 1, 2007
1,333
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Leicester LE4, UK.
Thanks for that info flecc, looks like it'll probably take 2 cylinders to get a bigger tyre up to a usable pressure. I like the sound of instantaneous inflation, especially when it's cold or wet or both.
 

Jed

Pedelecer
Nov 1, 2006
75
0
Hi Ian

I carry around 2 co2 cannisters in my rucksack, one for each wheel just in case! They are the ones that have the slimy stuff in it. I have not used one yet so fingers crossed i don't have to :D only a few quid from halfords

thanks

Jed
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
44,208
20,372
Yes, the two cylinder trick works ok Ian. That's how the similar devices for motor cycles are used. When I bought my "pump", a bought a box of six spare cylinders from my bike shop, just one used to date, two with the bike and still four in the box, so not breaking the bank.
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rsscott

Administrator
Staff member
Aug 17, 2006
1,347
173
I did read a while back on the Cycling Plus forums that some people had experienced some problems with the CO2 cans that didn't inflate the tyre properly, so I would advise everyone to carry a backup pump just in case.

Has anyone tried out the Cyclair (sp?) pump that uses a pull chord to inflate the tyre?
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
44,208
20,372
I did read a while back on the Cycling Plus forums that some people had experienced some problems with the CO2 cans that didn't inflate the tyre properly, so I would advise everyone to carry a backup pump just in case.

Has anyone tried out the Cyclair (sp?) pump that uses a pull chord to inflate the tyre?
I think that was the aerosol type cans though Russ, they weren't too good. The ones I'm referring to are the miniature thickwall very high pressure cylinders that were originally invented for the Sparklets soft drink maker many years ago. They have been reliable for over 50 years now.

After Sparklets they were next used in beer pumps designed for use on the infamous Watneys "Party 4" and "Party 7" beer containers and worked quite well there too until CAMRA showed people what real beer tasted like.

I haven't tried the pull cord pump but it looks a very good idea.
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Ian

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 1, 2007
1,333
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Leicester LE4, UK.
After Sparklets they were next used in beer pumps designed for use on the infamous Watneys "Party 4" and "Party 7" beer containers and worked quite well there too until CAMRA showed people what real beer tasted like.
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I found half a dozen left over from when I used one of those beer pumps which is what gave me the idea, they don't have threaded necks like the proper cycle ones so will probably end up getting binned.

Fizzy keg beer was enjoyable in the 70's but now the thought of it makes me cringe:(
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
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I found half a dozen left over from when I used one of those beer pumps which is what gave me the idea, they don't have threaded necks like the proper cycle ones so will probably end up getting binned.

(
There is a bike CO2 pump which uses the non-threaded ones Ian, I think my bike shop may have that as well, since they stock the spare unthreaded cylinders. Your cylinders could still be usable if that pump is cheap enough.
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Ian

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 1, 2007
1,333
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Leicester LE4, UK.
You're right Flecc, I've just looked on Wiggle and there's a lot of unthreaded cylinders, I just need to work out which "pumps" they fit.

As "Party 7" beer cans are no longer available I may as well use them for inflation purposes, and even if the beer cans were still available....
 

FatMog

Pedelecer
Mar 27, 2007
83
0
Has anyone tried out the Cyclair (sp?) pump that uses a pull chord to inflate the tyre?
Hi,

yes, I bought the cyclaire rapid the other week after my first puncture cos I had been reduced to carrying around a car footpump (don't laugh!) for a bit while I waited to see if my first ever puncture repair had worked. (It had :) ).

Anyway, I really like it, it's pretty small in the flesh and seems light to me, but after the car footpump anything is an improvement :D ! Haven't had to do a full inflate yet, just attached it to the valve and topped up. I prefer the stand-up posture and fairly relaxed pulling action to the bent-double pistoning thing (I have just reread this - no double entendres intended!)

Pressure gauge is nice and clear and it comes in two varieties; rapid up to about 60 psi I think, and original up to 120 psi or so for the lycra lovelies.
 

Nick

Pedelecer
Nov 4, 2006
152
0
I've used them on motorbike tyres and bicycle tyres and they work a treat. I bought this one - Truflo CO2 Pump for £7.99 | Truflo Pumps - CO2 | Cycle | Wiggle as it was the smallest I could see, though I've since heard that the threadless ones are much cheaper from airgun shops. I used a mini-pump once and it was too much like hard work to get a decent amount of air in the tyre. One 16g jobbie might be enough - I don't remember how many I used on my motorbike but it wasn't armfulls - and I carry two with me along with a spare tube.
 

Ian

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 1, 2007
1,333
0
Leicester LE4, UK.
Is this the CO2 of Global Warming fame?
Peter
It is indeed.

I'm not sure how the co2 in cylinders is produced but if it's produced by extraction from the atmosphere then it's environmental impact is neutral, if it's a by-product of another process then us re-cycling it will not add to the impact.

In any case the quantity is very small. To put in in perspective my (fairly green) car produces 130g co2 per km, while a typical inflator cylinder contains 12g, I'd guess thats about the same as a 24 pack of beer or a few bottles of pop.

Don't forget that the exertion of pumping up a tyre by hand will produce co2.

It's just occurred to me that the large co2 molecules should have a harder time creeping through the pores in an inner tube, therefore a tyre inflated with co2 should need less topping up, although it will be few grams heavier.
 

rsscott

Administrator
Staff member
Aug 17, 2006
1,347
173
Hi,

yes, I bought the cyclaire rapid the other week after my first puncture cos I had been reduced to carrying around a car footpump (don't laugh!) for a bit while I waited to see if my first ever puncture repair had worked. (It had :) ).

Anyway, I really like it, it's pretty small in the flesh and seems light to me, but after the car footpump anything is an improvement :D ! Haven't had to do a full inflate yet, just attached it to the valve and topped up. I prefer the stand-up posture and fairly relaxed pulling action to the bent-double pistoning thing (I have just reread this - no double entendres intended!)

Pressure gauge is nice and clear and it comes in two varieties; rapid up to about 60 psi I think, and original up to 120 psi or so for the lycra lovelies.
Yes, I've seen some good reviews on it. Think it's time to invest - I think they are under £20. Double entendres? the thought never crossed my mind ;-)

electric bikes for sale
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
44,208
20,372
It is indeed.

I'm not sure how the co2 in cylinders is produced but if it's produced by extraction from the atmosphere then it's environmental impact is neutral, if it's a by-product of another process then us re-cycling it will not add to the impact.
I believe it was the US Genuine-Innovations company which first introduced these CO2 pumps for bikes, and they are still a commonly found brand. They claim their CO2 is from natural production, so no problem. Their statement is:

"Our CO2 is obtained from a naturally occurring volcanic source"

Also, as Ian remarked, the quantities are minute for their very intermittent use, I may have breathed out enough CO2 to fill one of these cylinders while typing this!
 
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electric.mike

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 16, 2007
342
49
grimsby
i use these cylinders in one of my pistols, as you say the contents are minimal but i still have all my empty ones until i find an eco friendly way to dispose of them
mike
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
44,208
20,372
i use these cylinders in one of my pistols, as you say the contents are minimal but i still have all my empty ones until i find an eco friendly way to dispose of them
mike
The Genuine-Innovations cylinders bear the legend, "Please recycle this steel cylinder".

In other words dispose of them as steel scrap and that's what I did with my spent one, it went into the metals recycling skip during my weekly trip to the council recycling depot.

You'll get yours back as a Chinese bike no doubt. :D
 

Ian

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 1, 2007
1,333
0
Leicester LE4, UK.
Thanks for all the feedback on these devices, all of which seems positive. I'll certainly be adding one to my tool kit for the forthcoming long summer rides.

Ian.
 

Healthebike

Finding my (electric) wheels
May 2, 2007
13
0
North Louisiana USA
Any lightweight electric pumps?

Just to push the envelope a little, since we are riding electric bikes, is there a source for a tiny,light 12/24V/36V electric air pump that could be mounted on our bikes to inflate tires?


Nothing wrong with other solutions, but it would be satisfying to help a stranded motorist sometime :)
 

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