Crimping Tool

Aushiker

Pedelecer
I have one of those I guess they would be described as basic crimping tools, a wire stripper/crimp tool combo that sells for a few pesos. Something along the lines of this type but not even as fancy as this:



Anyway what I have is not the greatest tool and reading the How to Make A Quality Crimped Joint article linked to elsewhere here the author suggests using a ratchet crimping tool. My need is for a tool that ideally will be generic enough to the typical insulated terminals used in automotive circles and non-insulated terminals down to 2 mm size [spade size].

Any suggestions on a suitable tool or should I bite the bullet and get a couple of tools? Looking at ElectricScooterParts.com for example they show different tools for insulated and non-insulated terminals.

Thanks
Andrew
 
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Deleted member 4366

Guest
Those cheap crimping tools and terminals are not really suitable for Ebikes. I would only consider crimping the pins on connectors like PAS, throttle, lights etc. They need a specific crimping tool for the type of terminals you're using. Those cheap ones that you showed can't do them. You can do them pretty quickly and reliably with two pairs of thin-nosed pliers. For any connector that involves power, I would only solder.
 

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
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you need one tool for insulated crimps (terminal wires) and one for uninsulated crimps (bullet connectors)

for insulated (£14):


for uninsulated (£10):
 

Geebee

Esteemed Pedelecer
Mar 26, 2010
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Australia
The Autostar style one is available at Jaycar in Oz, around $14, it is a huge step up from the OP photo one.
With care you can do insulated ones with the non insulated tool but takes practice to do without insulation damage.
I second d8vehs comment re soldering, or even just buy solder connectors and forget the crimping tools.
 

Aushiker

Pedelecer
The Autostar style one is available at Jaycar in Oz, around $14, it is a huge step up from the OP photo one.
Thanks for the heads-up. I will take a look there.

I second d8vehs comment re soldering, or even just buy solder connectors and forget the crimping tools.
I use Anderson PowerPoles for my power connectors so okay there. The crimping tool(s) are for other jobs involving low power wiring (e.g, dynamo lights etc) and for other odd jobs, e.g., trying to wire a telephone cable today for an internet connection (long story about a house with some "installed" wiring :)

I just thought it would be worthwhile asking here.

Andrew
 
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trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
7,703
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insulated wires need to stay flexible. Soldering kills their flexibility, causing the joints to fracture over time at the point where the solder creeps to up the wire, the wire becomes brittle with the solder creep.
crimp when you want to be sure.

http://www.marinewireandcable.com/2013/11/crimping-vs-soldering-marine-cable-and.html

...
The importance is the call for a mechanical means of securing the wire to the connector which is accomplished via crimping. With the proper crimping tool using the correct crimping force you'll have a connection that well exceeds any recommended pull out requirements and still allows the stranded wire to do it's job of absorbing the vibrations. ...
 
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Deleted member 4366

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