Cube SUV Hybrid Pro

mrgeoff

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 12, 2015
24
4
48
UK
#1
Just bought an ebike, thought I got the right one from all the reviews, info here, and past cycling.

First of all, if your going anywhere near a trail, get full suspension. Forget the typical cycling blurb about full suspension wasting your effort, there is so much on tap from the assistance, it dosnt matter anymore.
The bike you buy will be exactly as capable as the components, the suspension front forks on the lesser bikes like my Cube Hybrid, I think are only there to take some of the shock out of smaller bumps for the sake of the mass.
All these Bosch ebikes are heavy. No issue at all riding due to the assistance, but the hardtail does thump a bit going down a trail.

The 15mph limit is about right on the trails and off road. But, what no one has really said is that on a paved cycle way or on the road, any ebike limited to 15mph is less enjoyable, borderline annoying. You sure notice that extra weight trying to push upwards of 18mph, which is easy on my pure road bike, but not here. The slightest rise and the mass comes into play, and you end up sitting at the limit of the 15mph assistance. I will be buying a dongle. If you are the type that are so much up the law, never never ever speed in a car, by accident or whatever, don’t bother with an ebike for the road, as 15mph just dosnt cut it for road riding. 20mph is needed, as a minimum.

The riding I have done so far is 90% trails. I didn’t think I would ride trails so much, but the assistance makes riding so much more enjoyable, I have done so much more than I ever expected, ridden up steep hills on trails I wouldn’t have even bothered pushing a normal bike up, as you certainly couldn’t ride up without assistance.

My recommendation would be to buy a full suspension, 45kph version, or full suspension plus dongle. Anything less is pointless for the trails.

For the road, anything with a dongle should be fine, but if you ever go near a trail, you will regret the lack of full suspension. Just spend a bit more!

To my bike. The Cube SUV pro is a good bike for what its designed to be. An urban bike. This is why I initially bought it, cycleways, light trails, tow paths etc.
Trouble is, the assistance has made heavy trails a breeze. Luckily, running the balloon tyres slightly softer, and the disk brakes make the going a bit easier. The forks are OK, think they are setup a bit hard, im not getting anywhere near full travel. Saddle is hard, but surprisingly comfortable. Think I may try and find something with some padding, just for the rougher trails. Seatpost is extremely long, I wear 36 inch long trousers, and the post is no where near maximum!
I love the gear hub. Nice clean lines, less maintenance, really suits the bike. Shifting stationary is great!
My only complaint is the cable routing, they are all far too long from the factory (I bought the largest frame size, so no excuse about commonality) these long cables make the bike look messy. I will maybe cut them down at some point when I find out how to deal with the re-termination of the hydraulic lines.

Enjoy!
 

D8ve

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 30, 2013
2,141
74
Bristol
#2
Welcome.
Nice first post and review.
I think you'll notice few full suspension bikes are happy at 20 mph.
Well not the legs of the cyclist powering her anyway.
Most road bikes are designed to run easier hence 20 mph is achievable.
Try a BH carbon race if you want assist and 20 mph on the road.
 
Oct 25, 2006
41,345
2,120
#3
Thanks for your informative post Mrgeoff. While I agree that 15 mph doesn't suit many, your views are very British. In northern Europe and particularly the Netherlands cyclists including e-bikers are mostly happy to amble around at lower speeds.

Perhaps annoyingly for those with your view, theirs is by far the most successful e-bike market with one in every six bikes sold being an e-bike and over 70% of the population cycling regularly.
.
 

RobF

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 22, 2012
4,442
125
#4
I'm surprised you find the bike doesn't perform well on trails.

You've done what you can by reducing tyre pressures.

Looks like it comes with Schwalbe Moto tyres, which are meant more for hard surfaces.

You could try a more mountain bike/general tyre such as a Smart Sam.

The forks are air adjustable, and the amount of air in them makes a lot of difference to the way they perform.

Rider weight comes into it, and you will need a shock pump to adjust the pressure.

There a knack to getting the right setting, so it's something you could ask a competent bike shop to do.

They will be able to set - and tell you - the pressure that's right for you.

It's then worth buying a shock pump so you can check it every month or six weeks.
 

mrgeoff

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 12, 2015
24
4
48
UK
#5
Thanks all.

While 20mph is maybe a lot for a mountain bike, but 15 is just too low. There will always be sections of road to link up trails, even with full suspension I think you will be hitting the wall, and to be honest, on the flat tow paths round here, going over 15 is easy even with my reduced tyre pressures.

Im Ok with the tyres at the moment with the reduced pressure, they seem fine on hard pack, and slightly loose surfaces. Yes, mud is useless, that's where a MTB tyre would benefit me.

I may try softeneing the forks, thanks. Not sure how this will help till I try it, as the rear end will still thump. This came apparent while riding "up" a wide fire track last night at speed around the 12-15mph mark, as it was up-hill, pedalling was required, and the rear end was thumping more than I would have liked.

This ebike has opened up my cycling to trails I would have never gone down before, never would I have thought about riding up and down all the steep hills, its all so easy now, I want more!

Cheers - Geoff.
 

RobF

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 22, 2012
4,442
125
#6
I may try softeneing the forks, thanks. .
You need the correct pressure.

Counter-intuitively, softening the forks can lead to a harsher ride.

This is because the fork compresses a little, and stays compressed, over small bumps.

After a few of these the fork is all but fully compressed.

When you hit a bigger bump, the fork has very little travel left to absorb the bump, so you get a jarring sensation.
 

EddiePJ

Esteemed Pedelecer
#7
Try a BH carbon race if you want assist and 20 mph on the road.
Whilst I loved my albeit short ride on Neo Race (not carbon) and found it one of the nicest most natural bikes that I have ridden, I think that mrgeof would struggle with the frame sizing. As far as I'm aware, it is just a one size fits all medium. I suspect that he would find it too small. Then you have the diabolical back up service to think about.
 
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D8ve

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 30, 2013
2,141
74
Bristol
#8
I've had two races, not the NEO though.
Both were fine for me.
I sold the first when I upgraded to the 36 volt system.
That was broken by a 4*4 but it had Shimano 105 group set and no issues at all.
My wife's Neo still no problems but it's style over substance in quality terms
 

mrgeoff

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 12, 2015
24
4
48
UK
#9
[/IMG]


Here is a picture from the first day. Its taken some beating, will take some pics Sunday, got another big trail ride coming up :)
 

EddiePJ

Esteemed Pedelecer
#10
1- The 15mph limit is about right on the trails and off road.

2- My recommendation would be to buy a full suspension, 45kph version, or full suspension plus dongle. Anything less is pointless for the trails.
I'm afraid that you have me confused.

I'd agree with the first, but not the second.
 

D C

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 25, 2013
908
86
Cairngorm National Park
#11
I'm afraid that you have me confused.

I'd agree with the first, but not the second.
Me too, I would sooner ride a good hardtail than a mediocre rear suspension system, especially with the addition of a good quality suspension seat post.
Certainly for the trails I mainly ride which I share with the occasional walkers, dogs and children, I agree that 15 mph is ample, I like to look at the scenery as well and hope not to become part of it!
Thanks for the interesting review Geoff.
Dave.
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
#12
Me too, I would sooner ride a good hardtail than a mediocre rear suspension system, especially with the addition of a good quality suspension seat post.
That's what I thought too until I did 1000 miles on one of those Trax bikes. The suspension did quite a lot for comfort, and it was OK on the trails too. It didn't have any damping, so it would clatter on big bumps. Apart from that I was quite impressed and would get another one if they had bigger frame sizes.
 

mrgeoff

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 12, 2015
24
4
48
UK
#13
Been doing some more miles.

Off road.

I have actually slowed a little, so my riding along tracks is an amount lower than the 15mph limit. I find the 15mph limit becoming annoying, due to the lack of consistency. Sometimes you have power, sometimes you don't.
I do not understand why im being pushed on this. I am 44 years old, don't consider myself fit, my longest ride in the last 10 years is occasionally popping into the city and back on an old hybrid style road bike.
the 15mph limit IS an issue off road.

On Road.

3 miles back from the shops yesterday on road, still pulling 16-18mph on the flat, thus with no assistance. Tyres still soft as I went via the tracks. You may as well buy a cheaper electric shopper bike if you want the under 15mph assistance!

Still having fun though, but it will get the dongle after Easter.


Geoff.
 

JohnCade

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 16, 2014
1,486
43
#14
3 miles back from the shops yesterday on road, still pulling 16-18mph on the flat, thus with no assistance. Tyres still soft as I went via the tracks. You may as well buy a cheaper electric shopper bike if you want the under 15mph assistance!

Still having fun though, but it will get the dongle after Easter.


Geoff.
But it’s not just about speed is it? It’s how the bike handles and how nice it is to ride. The quality of its components and how they integrate as a whole package. Or in other words how well designed it is for the job it has to do. As well as how well made it is and how long it will last.

The satisfaction achieved from something is dependent of many factors. But something that looks right and is well made and has quality will always give more pleasure than something which is price compromised and cheaply made. Yes the cheap shopper might go as fast as you vibrate and shake over the washboard out of town minor roads, and it might even stop too - sort of. But how much pleasure would it give you?

After all a good suit or leather jacket is expensive, and a boiler suit will do the job of clothing you just as well at a fraction of the price. But I don’t suppose you habitually wear one.
 
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D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
#15
But something that looks right and is well made and has quality will always give more pleasure than something which is price compromised and cheaply made.
Price has nothing to do with quality. A bike that does everything you want and more would be a good quality bike. Low price can make a considerable contribution to that quality, especially if you don't have a lot of money to spend.
 

RobF

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 22, 2012
4,442
125
#16
Price has nothing to do with quality. A bike that does everything you want and more would be a good quality bike. Low price can make a considerable contribution to that quality, especially if you don't have a lot of money to spend.
You continue to the grind the 'cheap is good' axe, but the above statement is simply garbage.

Paying more gives you better quality 99.99 per cent of the time.

How much money you have to spend is an entirely separate question, dragged in by you in an attempt to muddy the waters.

Expensive is good, cheap is crap.

It's that simple.
 
Jun 30, 2014
234
25
60
Kent
#17
Expensive is good, cheap is crap.

It's that simple.
Sorry,but thats not quite correct is it.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

As you only ride what you can afford to buy/pay as this thread reads it sounds bike snobbery as I have a more expensive bike than yours etc etc.
 

JohnCade

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 16, 2014
1,486
43
#18
Sorry,but thats not quite correct is it.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

As you only ride what you can afford to buy/pay as this thread reads it sounds bike snobbery as I have a more expensive bike than yours etc etc.
The OP was suggesting that since he couldn’t go any faster on his Cube than the standard cut off he might as well have a cheap shopper. Tongue in cheek no doubt, and I pointed out that there is more to it than just how fast it can go.

In any purchase cost has to be balanced against quality and other factors too like personal preference. The most expensive of anything is almost never the absolute best. But the cheapest of anything is almost always among the worst. I don’t think that cheap is always crap by any means, but I do think that most very cheap bikes are not very nice to ride. That goes for non electric bikes too of course since in many or most cases it’s the bike components and build quality which make for a good or bad ride.
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
#19
You continue to the grind the 'cheap is good' axe, but the above statement is simply garbage.

Paying more gives you better quality 99.99 per cent of the time.

How much money you have to spend is an entirely separate question, dragged in by you in an attempt to muddy the waters.

Expensive is good, cheap is crap.

It's that simple.
That's a very angry post. I don't grind the "cheap is good" axe". I grind the "right price is good" axe.

I was a quality specialist during the main part of my working life. I spent a lot of time training people in how it should work - everybody from guys sweeping up to the board directors of multinational companies. In fact I know a lot more about quality than I do about electric bikes.

The ISO 8402-1986 standard defines quality as "the totality of features and characteristics of a product or service that bears its ability to satisfy stated or implied needs."

The point is that one person's needs, implied or otherwise may be different to somebody elses, so what's good quality to one person can be different to another's. Also, at different price points, customers have different expectations.

When people asked me about what quality is, I used to say that you often don't know when you've got it, but you surely will know when you haven't. If your happy with a product, service, relationship, etc, you have quality. You can be just as happy with a cheap bike as you can with an expensive one, normally more so, since you have higher expectations when you buy an expensive one, so the chance of falling short is higher.
 

RobF

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 22, 2012
4,442
125
#20
Sorry,but thats not quite correct is it.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

As you only ride what you can afford to buy/pay as this thread reads it sounds bike snobbery as I have a more expensive bike than yours etc etc.
The person is irrelevant, you have been fooled by d8 bringing the buyer into this discussion as he always does.

We are talking about the quality of a manufactured product, nothing else.
 

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