E-bike disassembly for travel on European trains

Kate page

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 9, 2018
16
6
Hi,

I am looking for practical advice on ebike disassembly, so I can travel within France on a touring holiday as I am hoping to do the Euro Velo 17.
Is it something that is reasonable enough to do?
Does anyone have any pointers or tips?
 

danielrlee

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 27, 2012
1,179
609
Westbury, Wiltshire
torquetech.co.uk
Hi,

I am looking for practical advice on ebike disassembly, so I can travel within France on a touring holiday as I am hoping to do the Euro Velo 17.
Is it something that is reasonable enough to do?
Does anyone have any pointers or tips?
Hi

In what circumstances do you envisage having to dismantle your ebike during your travels?
 

Kate page

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 9, 2018
16
6
I am starting and ending from Zurich.
When I get to the end of Euro Velo 17, I would like to get back there without having to the do the round-trip as part of the holiday. Using the train allows us to go to Mulhouse and back to Zurich, and the only way to travel on that train is to disassemble.
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
42,893
18,841
This is something unfamiliar to most of us, so can you let us know the e-bike in question and also what size it's expected to go down to Kate?
.
 

Kate page

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 9, 2018
16
6
I can try to answer as much as possible.

I have a R+M New Charger.
The TGV train i am travelling on wants your bike to take up the following dimensions:
  • treat it as carryon luggage. Fold or disassemble your bicycle*, pack it in a bike bag no larger than 120 cm high x 90 cm wide and be sure to tag it. As long as there’s space available, your bicycle travels free on all our trains.
I am sure I can expand on this a little, but as you see its not much space....
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
42,893
18,841
I'm placing a photo of the bike below for others to reference. Those dimensions mean taking out both wheels, removing the rear carrier, stand and rear mudguard and possibly lowering the saddle. Turning the handlebars into line will also make it easier to handle. It might also be necessary to remove the front mudguard to get the length within 120 cm. The handlebar to forks base will hopefully be within 90cm., but if not the forks could be compressed and tied to reduce that.

This is a big stripdown and you'll have to guard against damaging the brake disc rotors when out of their mountings and also bag and tie up the loose chain. And of course obtain a suitable bag of that size and wide enough to take the frame with wheels, packaging and other parts alongside. It will be heavy to pick up of course.
 
Last edited:

Kate page

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 9, 2018
16
6
I'm placing a photo of the bike below for others to reference. Those dimensions mean taking out both wheels, removing the rear carrier, stand and rear mudguard and possibly lowering the saddle. Turning the handlebars into line will also make it easier to handle. It might also be necessary to remove the front mudguard to get the length within 120 cm. The handlebar to forks base will hopefully be within 90cm., but if not the forks could be compressed and tied to reduce that.

This is a big stripdown and you'll have to guard against damaging the brake disc rotors when out of their mountings and also bag and tie up the loose chain. And of course obtain a suitable bag of that size and wide enough to take the frame with wheels, packaging and other parts alongside. It will be heavy to pick up of course.
Thanks for that, this is great advice. I think i need to take my bike apart this evening and see if it is do-able...
 

chris_n

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 29, 2016
565
362
57
Austria , Niederau or NE England
When I have seen bikes with suspension forks in bike bags the forks have been removed. Hopefully not necessary but not the end of the world if you have to. When I put my bike in the boot the forks have to come off.
You will probably need to remove the pedals too. Have some spacers available to fit between the brake pads in case the brake levers get caught.
 

EddiePJ

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 7, 2013
4,530
3,913
Crowborough, East Sussex
www.facebook.com
That is going to be tight.

The wheelbase for the 46cm frame is 113cm, the 49cm frame is 116cm and the 53cm frame is 119cm.

As Chris has said, I suspect that you might well have to remove the front forks as well.

It would be ideal if you could leave the rear wheel in and drop the whole front end out.

RIESEMULLER%20NEW%20CHARGER%20GH%20NUVINCI%20WHITE%202018%20BOSCH-800x800.jpg
 

anotherkiwi

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 26, 2015
7,713
5,735
The European Union
Sorry Kate but the SNCF really wants you to pay for your bike's space on the train. Only a folder will fit in the space they have defined as "free".

TER (regional trains) have space for bikes but all the others you have to pay.
 
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MikeS

Pedelecer
Jun 29, 2018
242
59
69
Sorry Kate but the SNCF really wants you to pay for your bike's space on the train. Only a folder will fit in the space they have defined as "free".

TER (regional trains) have space for bikes but all the others you have to pay.
That's interesting. So they are not saying we have to send it separately by road or rail transport and you can put it on 'whole' you just have to pay extra (typically how much do they charge -eg for a 100 euro person journey?)
Mike
 

EddiePJ

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 7, 2013
4,530
3,913
Crowborough, East Sussex
www.facebook.com
Sorry Kate but the SNCF really wants you to pay for your bike's space on the train. Only a folder will fit in the space they have defined as "free".

TER (regional trains) have space for bikes but all the others you have to pay.
I did think it odd, as whenever I have used the trains in Switzerland, I have always had to pay for the bike as a passenger paying fare.
 

anotherkiwi

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 26, 2015
7,713
5,735
The European Union
On a TGV a bike costs 10 €, you have to reserve. So it isn't a costly option if you are on a simple journey. However if you are doing Eurostar to Paris that is 15€ then another 10€ for Paris - Strasbourg.

I wonder what they would say if I rolled up on my trike? Actually I might be doing just that in November for a St Jean to Nantes trip. I was going to ride up but I'm not sure I will be motorised in time.
 

Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
5,292
7,822
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Ireland
I'm placing a photo of the bike below for others to reference. Those dimensions mean taking out both wheels, removing the rear carrier, stand and rear mudguard and possibly lowering the saddle. Turning the handlebars into line will also make it easier to handle. It might also be necessary to remove the front mudguard to get the length within 120 cm. The handlebar to forks base will hopefully be within 90cm., but if not the forks could be compressed and tied to reduce that.

This is a big stripdown and you'll have to guard against damaging the brake disc rotors when out of their mountings and also bag and tie up the loose chain. And of course obtain a suitable bag of that size and wide enough to take the frame with wheels, packaging and other parts alongside. It will be heavy to pick up of course.
I remember taking a bike by plane to Paris in 76. What I had to do was remove the two wheels and secure them to the frame ,rotate the handle bars and deflate the tyres. No bike bags then, but it appeared on the conveyor belt along with other baggage. .. The fun was reinflating the tyres in a temperature of 37 degrees. There was no air conditioning in the arrivals hall at Orly.. (it was a student type flight), so bending to tighten a single nut or one stroke of the pump was an effort!. Of all the things I had remembered to bring, a lock was not one, and the bike was nicked an hour later,when I was in a shop buying one!!!!.
 
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flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
42,893
18,841
I remember taking a bike by plane to Paris in 76. What I had to do was remove the two wheels and secure them to the frame ,rotate the handle bars and deflate the tyres. No bike bags then, but it appeared on the conveyor belt along with other baggage. .. The fun was reinflating the tyres in a temperature of 37 degrees. There was no air conditioning in the arrivals hall at Orly.. (it was a student type flight), so bending to tighten a single nut or one stroke of the pump was an effort!. Of all the things I had remembered to bring, a lock was not one, and the bike was nicked an hour later,when I was in a shop buying one!!!!.
My Orly experiences were in the early 1960s on business flights in Air France Caravelles. Those were the days to fly, when not many did. Then I could drive to Heathrow, park very close to the terminal, check in 20 minutes before boarding and come back a week later and not be bankrupted by the parking fee.

Flying today I regard as an uncivilised misery.
.
 

Kate page

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 9, 2018
16
6
Thanks everyone for your insight, and advice.
I took my bike apart as much as possible.
I am leaving the back wheel on, detaching the handlebars, front wheel, saddle.
It took about 40 mins to do, but it seems that it will work for me.
FYI, I am travelling on the TGV Lyria, and I have a bike space reserved.
In Switzerland, there is a general charge for bikes, so I will pay for the bike when I get there
Wish me luck, and thanks again!
 

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