Guernsey first to apply ebike law?

Oct 25, 2006
40,251
228
113
#2
It seems Guernsey are determined to be in the lead in enforcing EAPC law.

Many years ago when the EAPC power limit was 200 watts they acted against an e-bike hire shop who were hiring out 250 watt e-bikes.
.
 
Jan 26, 2015
6,951
139
113
The European Union
#3
Would they have a lot of other stuff to do protecting the population from things that represent more danger than a 33 mph e-bike?

Oh! They were protecting the rider from himself...
 

oyster

Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2017
1,730
95
113
West West Wales
#5
Just how did they test it? The story is bereft of detail.
 
Oct 25, 2006
40,251
228
113
#6
Just how did they test it? The story is bereft of detail.
They can be quite thorough there, perhaps checked it against a car running with it.

This has to be viewed in the context of that little 9 miles by 4 miles island. There's an overall 35 mph speed limit and in addition many urban approach roads and parishes have a 25 mph speed limit. Their environment department consider an island wide blanket 20 mph would be more appropriate.

In that overall context the bike's powered 33 mph could be considered very inappropriate.
.
 
Feb 17, 2011
2,490
112
113
#7
Presumably he was speeding.
This may well not be the first case and only got press coverage because of the size of the island.
Seeing the mainland Police preference for issuing cautions, we really do not know if others have been caught.
In a city, a guilty plea in a suburban magistrates court to a small motoring offence might not get any publicity.
 

oyster

Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2017
1,730
95
113
West West Wales
#8
They can be quite thorough there, perhaps checked it against a car running with it.

This has to be viewed in the context of that little 9 miles by 4 miles island. There's an overall 35 mph speed limit and in addition many urban approach roads and parishes have a 25 mph speed limit. Their environment department consider an island wide blanket 20 mph would be more appropriate.

In that overall context the bike's powered 33 mph could be considered very inappropriate.
.
Understanding all that - but did they get the fittest, most able cycling bobbie to put everything into going as fast as he could? Or use a throttle and no pedalling?

Even I can manage over 15.5 mph (on the flat or gentle rise - let alone downhill) which would appear to break the top speed requirement.

Anyone riding an electrically-assisted bicycle more powerful that 250 watts or with a top speed of more than 15.5mph needs these documents.
 
Oct 25, 2006
40,251
228
113
#9
Understanding all that - but did they get the fittest, most able cycling bobbie to put everything into going as fast as he could? Or use a throttle and no pedalling?
I'm quite sure it was a power only tested speed, from what I know of the previous case they clearly understand the EAPC law. They make their own laws but with this issue just adopt ours unchanged into their legislation.
.
 

oyster

Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2017
1,730
95
113
West West Wales
#10
I'm quite sure it was a power only tested speed, from what I know of the previous case they clearly understand the EAPC law. They make their own laws but with this issue just adopt ours unchanged into their legislation.
.
In which case, where can I get one? ;)

(No - I don't want one really.)
 
Oct 25, 2006
40,251
228
113
#12
In which case, where can I get one? ;)

(No - I don't want one really.)
It was probably one of the Chinese DD kit motors which can be around 2000 watts or more and capable of that speed. Or a ready made bike using one of those like those from Xipi.

This firm lists 35 mph and 50 mph e-bike kits if you scroll down, plus 3000 watt and 6000 watt hub motors.
.
 
May 23, 2015
8,208
99
113
#14
This has nothing to do with Guernsey which is what we are discussing. They make their own laws and are not part of the UK.
.
good place to stash all ur cash tho as a tax haven but thats fine is it not wot wot :)
 

Nealh

Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
6,098
120
113
55
West Sx RH
#15
Being such a small island he was always going to be noticed if they have a strict road enforcement policy, if it had been Jersey then Jim would have to many crimes to solve.
I expect a normal racing bike wizzing around would be fine just a case of them upholding the law for an unlicensed bike and little else to do.

9 x 4 miles around your little world in an hour or so, in a whole day of exploring you would soon get bored of the island with no where else to go.
Seems like an ebike is hardly worth the effort !!!
 
Jan 26, 2015
6,951
139
113
The European Union
#16
Wasn't there a guy on here or maybe on ES from Guernsey with a hot rod DD bike?

My guess is that he was caught by a hand held radar doing over 25 mph and so they investigated. The 33 mph could be just them lifting the rear wheel off the ground and giving it full throttle - not putting any bobbies life in danger!

I am guessing that there isn't a single illegal petrol powered moped running around the island either. No noise after tea time etc etc.
 
#17
Understanding all that - but did they get the fittest, most able cycling bobbie to put everything into going as fast as he could? Or use a throttle and no pedalling?

Even I can manage over 15.5 mph (on the flat or gentle rise - let alone downhill) which would appear to break the top speed requirement.

Anyone riding an electrically-assisted bicycle more powerful that 250 watts or with a top speed of more than 15.5mph needs these documents.
Just to clarify, the assistance has to cut out at 15.5mph. Above that speed you can ride as fast as you like.

There is no offense of speeding on a bicycle (unless there is a specific speed limit in place, like Richmond Park).

Its only when you remove the motor assistance speed limit, therefore creating an electric motor vehicle, that you can be prosecuted for speeding, along with the other issues mentioned about a lack of insurance, helmet etc etc... none of which is required on a bicycle.
 

Hightechpete

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jan 20, 2018
74
3
8
67
west Wales
#18
A google search reveals a prosecution in 2011 for being 'Drunk in charge', and another for riding a segway on the pavement :-

https://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/man-ended-up-six-points-12031624

Is anyone aware of any others?.

Not that I'm particularly concerned 'cause my ride is perfectly legal (except for the throttle bit) ' Installed before 2016 Your Honour'. But it would be nice to know what the likely consequences would be.

' Riding a non EAPC approved bike' would be one option, but ' riding a motor vehicle without insurance' having your vehicle scrapped and getting six points on your license is bit worrying.
 
Oct 25, 2006
40,251
228
113
#19
' Riding a non EAPC approved bike' would be one option, but ' riding a motor vehicle without insurance' having your vehicle scrapped and getting six points on your license is bit worrying.
There is no such charge as riding a non EPAC, so charges have to be based on some aspect of motor vehicle law.

Generally speaking the police avoid being vindictive and throwing the whole book at offenders, preferring to use the most suitable individual charge. That usually results in a substantial fine, but scrapping orders are rare, mainly confined to the mini-motos etc of repeat offenders.

However, where no accident is involved and there's been no substantial nuisance to others, most such offences result in a simple police warning, often only on the spot. The police don't like getting involved in the more unusual and difficult areas of vehicle law where they can feel on shaky ground. They will act on clear illegalities though, for example if riding your illegal EAPC on the pavement, the latter charge can be preferred and the vehicle illegality only getting a mention in court. There have been a few Segway cases bearing this out.
.
 
Last edited:

Related Articles

Advertisers