Help! How much can the BBS01B handle?

Thomass

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 17, 2018
8
0
Hi guys!

So i'm running the new BBS01B 18A 350W. I got i configured with Karls special sauce, which means about 80% keep current and the other settings in that config.

My question is, can this motor run PAS 9 with these settings for longer runs? I do a 20 mile commuting everyday, with the possibility to go fast on closed ground, but will it push this engine to much to go 28-30 mph with PAS 9 for longer periods?

Is it alright for the motor to be handwarm at the end of a commute?

Best regards,
Thomas
 

peter.c

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 24, 2018
693
188
thurrock essex
The motor will run pas 9 for moderate periods as long as you pedal as well, but not on throttle only it will get very warm if you go up hills and if you let it bog down in the gears you are very near the upper limits for reliability that's why when you buy a motor the settings are so low
The battery will not last long at 18 amps constant draw mine is now in a trike[ its been in a few different builds and is a couple of years old now] with a 27ah battery pack and a 36 tooth chain ring so not geared for top speed but draws 800watts in short bursts and hums along at 400-500watts it gets warm to the touch

If you want more speed I put a 52 chain wheel on but it can cause the controller to fail if you get the gearing wrong on a climb:eek: the easy way is to upgrade to the 25 amp controller but even then at 36v it makes a lot of heat
 

Thomass

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 17, 2018
8
0
The motor will run pas 9 for moderate periods as long as you pedal as well, but not on throttle only it will get very warm if you go up hills and if you let it bog down in the gears you are very near the upper limits for reliability that's why when you buy a motor the settings are so low
The battery will not last long at 18 amps constant draw mine is now in a trike[ its been in a few different builds and is a couple of years old now] with a 27ah battery pack and a 36 tooth chain ring so not geared for top speed but draws 800watts in short bursts and hums along at 400-500watts it gets warm to the touch

If you want more speed I put a 52 chain wheel on but it can cause the controller to fail if you get the gearing wrong on a climb:eek: the easy way is to upgrade to the 25 amp controller but even then at 36v it makes a lot of heat
Thanks a lot for the answer.
I haven't installed the throttle, i'm in alright shape, used to roadcycling and i hate low cadence :D

Well, the battery must be replaced when it's sagged, that's a given as you say.

Thank you, that gave me some confidence for going all in on the straight stretches with high cadence.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
1,781
403
Basildon
Motors only get hot when they get slowed down under load. As long as you keep your cadence up, say 60 or more, it'll be OK.
 

soundwave

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 23, 2015
9,040
3,762
Others WHO's got experience pushing this engine to its limits?
 

Thomass

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 17, 2018
8
0
get the bbshd then :)
Indeed, that should have been the choice, but now i'm stuck with this one. Perhaps i should just go all out and let run with 100% keep current, 18A and see which will die first, battery or motor?

Then i'll have a good excuse for getting a bigger one =D
 

soundwave

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 23, 2015
9,040
3,762
if you go to far you will burn up the controller in the motor, you can change the controller for more woof tho then you will blow up the motor or the batt will explode with fire ;)

 
  • :D
Reactions: Woosh

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
1,781
403
Basildon
You don't seem to understand what pushing it hard means. The current depends on two things: 1. How much the controller allows. 2. How fast you turn the crank. At a certain point of crank speed, the current reduces below what the controller allows. Say you have a cadence of 80, you could use a 100 amp controller and it would make no difference except at start up, when you're still getting the crank up to speed. To get more power out of the motor, you need to turn the crank slower.

With your 18A controller, it will allow 18 amps or about 720w from the battery at start-up. You should put a wattmeter on it to see how much power it uses when you ride it, and to see when it actually delivers the 720w because if you changed to say a 25A controller, any time the wattmeter showed less than 720w, the power would be the same as the 18A one. I think you'll find that's most of the time.
 

peter.c

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 24, 2018
693
188
thurrock essex
The watts peak for a few seconds and then drop back to a running level .That isthe min the motor needs to maintain the speed and current [ level set in the selected pas mode] the watt meter in the display shows a good indication once it gets to the sweet spot even if you ghost pedal to keep the motor engaged it will not draw full amps once you blow one controller the cost will put you off max current settings if you want more buy the bbshd
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
10,873
7,896
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
Indeed, that should have been the choice, but now i'm stuck with this one. Perhaps i should just go all out and let run with 100% keep current, 18A and see which will die first, battery or motor?

Then i'll have a good excuse for getting a bigger one =D
if where you live is flat, you are not going to kill your kit.
The amount of assist power depends very much on the speed you are riding at, minus your own pedalling.
On a 36V BBS kit, the power falls at above 80 RPM, your motor won't overheat when you exceed that speed, about 23mph on a 26" wheel, 25mph on a 700C wheel in the highest gear.
The usual way to kill a CD motor is to ride on throttle in the wrong gear up a steep hill.
(You can't do that with a hub motor, so hub motors are better for commuting because they are much more fault tolerant).
 

Thomass

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 17, 2018
8
0
You don't seem to understand what pushing it hard means. The current depends on two things: 1. How much the controller allows. 2. How fast you turn the crank. At a certain point of crank speed, the current reduces below what the controller allows. Say you have a cadence of 80, you could use a 100 amp controller and it would make no difference except at start up, when you're still getting the crank up to speed. To get more power out of the motor, you need to turn the crank slower.

With your 18A controller, it will allow 18 amps or about 720w from the battery at start-up. You should put a wattmeter on it to see how much power it uses when you ride it, and to see when it actually delivers the 720w because if you changed to say a 25A controller, any time the wattmeter showed less than 720w, the power would be the same as the 18A one. I think you'll find that's most of the time.
I'm starting to understand that I can't keep the high cadence as i want, i'll get a wattmeter and see in which area it performs the best.

So to get this straight, if i want the most current support from the controller, i'll need to lower my candance in order to get a higher wattage?
 

Thomass

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 17, 2018
8
0
The watts peak for a few seconds and then drop back to a running level .That isthe min the motor needs to maintain the speed and current [ level set in the selected pas mode] the watt meter in the display shows a good indication once it gets to the sweet spot even if you ghost pedal to keep the motor engaged it will not draw full amps once you blow one controller the cost will put you off max current settings if you want more buy the bbshd
You're right, I should. Thanks
 

Thomass

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 17, 2018
8
0
if where you live is flat, you are not going to kill your kit.
The amount of assist power depends very much on the speed you are riding at, minus your own pedalling.
On a 36V BBS kit, the power falls at above 80 RPM, your motor won't overheat when you exceed that speed, about 23mph on a 26" wheel, 25mph on a 700C wheel in the highest gear.
The usual way to kill a CD motor is to ride on throttle in the wrong gear up a steep hill.
(You can't do that with a hub motor, so hub motors are better for commuting because they are much more fault tolerant).
It's a flat area, no hills.
Thanks for the input, mate.
 

anotherkiwi

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 26, 2015
7,642
5,707
The European Union
The GSM which is a BBS01 clone cuts out at cadence over 90. That is a bit of a disappointment to me because I have a natural cadence of around 100 (now verified by cadence meter). Running an external controller I have upped the voltage to 44 and cadence is just about right when the battery is fully charged. 44v x 15 Amps and 36v x 18 Amps is much of a muchness when it comes to power but the extra voltage makes the motor spin faster and it seem more efficient at those RPM.

On the flat in the right gear I managed 45 km/h in assistance level 4 of 5, in fact increasing the assistance level brought no increase in top speed (because of the cadence issue I think).
 

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