Lazer buffer zone???

JohnInStockie

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 10, 2006
1,048
0
Stockport, SK7
Hi guys,

An interesting article here from Roadcc on some guys idea of using lazers to provide a buffer zone and act as proximity sensors setting off an alarm if anything gets to close.

The reporter asks if anyone has thought of using bog-standard parking sensors to do this on a bike, maybe powered by a dynamo.

Anyone tried anything like this?

John
 

Mussels

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 17, 2008
3,208
8
Crowborough
It would be possible but a long range would be going off all the time and short range will warn you too late to do anything.
If it can identify that a car is about to hit you then you might just have enough time to tighten your sphincter but nothing else.

Have I got the wrong end of the stick here?
 

JohnInStockie

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 10, 2006
1,048
0
Stockport, SK7
ON my bike, I have often had drivers 'forget' that I am there, and drift leftwards into me. Thankfully a quick blast on the Airzound reminds them that they need to focus on something other than their radio for a mo.

If something existed that could do this for you . . . . :rolleyes:

Of course I am talking about commuting in traffic, not leisure riding where it would be utterly pointless.
 

HarryB

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 22, 2007
1,317
3
London
It wouldn't work in London. The horn/alarm needs to be loud enough to warn other drivers, it is no use as a warning for me as I can see what is going on in my mirror. You would have to switch it off every time you filtered through traffic and remember to turn it back on. I get the impression it is not a very serious idea anyway.
 

HarryB

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 22, 2007
1,317
3
London
Thankfully a quick blast on the Airzound reminds them that they need to focus on something other than their radio for a mo.
Yes the Airzound it is highly recommended.
 

Mussels

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 17, 2008
3,208
8
Crowborough
Yes the Airzound it is highly recommended.
I found otherwise unfortunately, in heavy traffic nobody noticed it and in the quiet park it was likely to give someone a heart attack. Also it was bulky and easy to steal so a pain if you want to lock your bike in a public place.
Shouting get's more notice and little bell is good for the off road bits.
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
45,910
22,538
Like Mussels, I found the Airzound little use for exactly the same reasons, and I no longer use one.

I think any laser warning of proximity will be too late to be any use, and like Harry, I prefer a mirror which gives me longer range warning of approaching vehicles. A mirror also gives much more information, such as driving behaviour, speed of approach, indicator signals, driver intent etc, so is much safer than any other method of detection to the rear.
.
 

JohnInStockie

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 10, 2006
1,048
0
Stockport, SK7
My experiences are completely different. In extremely heavy traffic, the Airzound for me works very well, but so long as it is on full blast, I now have the Airzound 3 which sounds exactly like a Truck, so loud it simply cannot be missed (only ignored), so much so Ive had most people emergency brake when I have had to blow it some times. Ive never ever seen any one miss it!!

I dont understand the 'bulky' post, as you can just take it off the bike, and there is absolutely no way I could physically shout as loud as one of these??

I am a bit confused here, I ride in heavy traffic, so much heavy traffic, that I check my rear view mirrors (1 helmet, 1 bar) about every 15 secs or less, but that still means that 90% of the cars that pass me do so unobserved by me.

If I was to watch every car that went past me with my either of the 2 mirrors I use I wouldnt get to work on the roads I use.

So my view is if you commute in congested or heavy traffic regularly, the Airzound (or some other 120Db horn, as well as mirrors) are an absolute must!

John
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
45,910
22,538
Mussels and I are both in London boroughs John, so we certainly know what heavy traffic is, we have the highest traffic densities in Britain! There's obviously a difference in the way I use my mirror, since I don't do a positive look every so often as you describe. My right hand mirror is within my field of peripheral vision so I can always see any movement in it without losing attention to the road ahead. Maybe theres a personal height difference, a mirror mounting difference or a field of vision difference, but I only need to turn concentration onto the mirror when there's a particular possibility of a difficulty arising. Of course with two mirrors you have given yourself more to do.

The difference with my Airzound is that I didn't believe in blasting other road users with it except in the most extreme circumstance. Since it was far too loud for pedestrians, particularly the elderly, it meant it got little use so I left it off my present bike and just have a small electric horn suitable for use with pedestrians.
.
 
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HarryB

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 22, 2007
1,317
3
London
I am with John on the airzound. For pedestrians I talk or even shout depending on the situation. Usually an "excuse me" does the trick but for ipodestrians a horn is sometimes required. If you tap it lightly it is not so loud but can be a lifesaver in heavy traffic on its loudest setting.
 

Haku

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 20, 2007
339
4
Gloucestershire
[eBay] Insanely LOUD 12V Dual Air Horn

I'm trying to think up an excuse to get one of these because they're not very expensive, I live in the countryside so I don't often get stuck in traffic as I can usually avoid it by going along public pathways & different routes, the best excuse I can think of is to integrate into a bike shed alarm system - but it would probably give a burglar a heart attack :D


edit: is this the most impractical air horn setup in the world? YouTube - AIR HORN mounted on Bike ( upgraded ) :D
 
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flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
45,910
22,538
That was a bit much Haku. :D

You've highlighted part of my problem with the Airzound. I ride in town, suburbs and country, and on the fringes I have a number of shared use paths away from the roads. The Airzound needs to be at max to get drivers to hear it, but then even a quick toot can give a fright to walkers on a very peaceful shared use path.

Since I found drivers in heavy traffic heard it but often didn't seem to know where the sound had come from or what the message was, it lost much of it's point for me.
.
 

Phil [OnBike]

Pedelecer
May 21, 2009
54
0
Love it - What an ingenious little device!!!

There are pros and cons to the device as you've all mentioned, but still good thinking nonetheless :)

I hate it when cars don't give me enough room, especailly when drivers will not wait a few seconds and squeeze round you as another car is coming the other way :mad:
 

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