Mid Drive Pashley Sovereign TSDZ2

E-Pashley

Finding my (electric) wheels
Apr 23, 2020
12
14
I have recently converted my Sovereign Roadster to Mid drive. The goals of the conversion was to make this heavy bike more usable in hilly areas while preserving the look and character of the bike.

35253

The Tongsheng motor fitted with a little fettling; I had to grind out the welds on the bottom bracket a little to allow the unit to slide through, and the lower pump mounting lug stopped me fitting the support bracket as supplied.

35254

To fit the support bracket I had to reverse it and bolt it to the prop stand bracket on the frame, unfortunately the bracket isn't symmetric and I had to fit a spacer tube and longer bolt to hold it onto the motor case.

The chain ring boss and chain guard on the motor wouldn't fit inside the enclosed chain guard on the bike, so in an effort to keep the original look I opted to cut the original guard around the chain ring guard. It worked out not to badly:

35255

The original crank arms were reused, reducing the peddle width (Q factor??). The right hand crank had to have the chain wheel ground off, so no going back!

The battery is mounted onto the rear rack, not ideal I know. Originally I planned to mount it on the seat tube, but ordered a battery that was too long :confused: So I 3D printed a mounting to fit the rack.
35256

The panniers are a pair of canvas messenger bags from Amazon, more 3D printing to make clips to mount them on the rack and straps because they got in the way of my heels when they were full.

I ordered my motor kit with the VLCD6 display. It may not have the bells and whistles of the VLCD5 but it has all the functions you actually need and it looks much better on the bike:
35257

I opted for the legal 250W, 36V kit and I'm very glad I did. The bike doesn't feel like a moped (well maybe a bit like my old Raleigh Runabout), but now the Pashley feels like my Ridgeback tourer to pedal, but with 50% more speed :). It's amazing how quickly it reaches the 25kph limiter - in fact, I've selected the 45kph limit now as my comfort speed is around 28kph and the motor cutting in and out was frustrating.

I've only covered 150Km so far (one down side of the VLCD6 - it's only KM) so it's too early to really review the motor, but so far I'm really enjoying being able to cycle the 22Km (220M climb) to work every day in around 1 hour. The round trip (44Km) uses about 50% of my 12Ah battery using levels 3 & 4 assist most of the time, but most impressively, the bike feels exactly the same when pedaling with the motor turned off.

Hopefully I'll have more to say about the motor in a few hundred Km.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
12,896
5,033
57
West Sx RH
Nice looking job and bike looks great.
 

Benjahmin

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 10, 2014
1,847
1,247
66
West Wales
If you were to wear a uniform with a tall hat and pc49 on the shoulders the job would be complete.;)
Nice build.
 

E-Pashley

Finding my (electric) wheels
Apr 23, 2020
12
14
Thanks guys. These forums were a big help when deciding what kit to choose.

It's nice when your cycle clothes are a tweed jacket and flat cap - I'm not built for lycra :D
 
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Hubby

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jun 24, 2020
7
2
That's really tidy and very subtle!
Obvs the battery's a bit of a let down, but i don't think it'd look well with a frame mounted battery anyway, a more discreet rack battery would finish this project really well, it must be a joy to ride.
(I'm now beginning to think that i need to get more familiar with 3D printing!)
 

Swizz

Pedelecer
Oct 1, 2017
209
153
45
Sk14
Very well done that is a really tidy job. Kudos on keeping the cranks and chainguard - there is a Pashley Britannia in our household and if I get asked to convert it, it's nice to know that keeping its original look will be possible!
 
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MikelBikel

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 6, 2017
312
185
Ireland
This is a real inspiration to me in seeking to convert a Raleigh DL-1.
I particularly like the fit of the chain case, looks factory made.
And grinding the chain wheel off the original crank to reuse it, great, all that chrome! :p
 
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MikeG

Just Joined
Jan 10, 2021
4
0
I have recently converted my Sovereign Roadster to Mid drive. The goals of the conversion was to make this heavy bike more usable in hilly areas while preserving the look and character of the bike.

View attachment 35253

The Tongsheng motor fitted with a little fettling; I had to grind out the welds on the bottom bracket a little to allow the unit to slide through, and the lower pump mounting lug stopped me fitting the support bracket as supplied.

View attachment 35254

To fit the support bracket I had to reverse it and bolt it to the prop stand bracket on the frame, unfortunately the bracket isn't symmetric and I had to fit a spacer tube and longer bolt to hold it onto the motor case.

The chain ring boss and chain guard on the motor wouldn't fit inside the enclosed chain guard on the bike, so in an effort to keep the original look I opted to cut the original guard around the chain ring guard. It worked out not to badly:

View attachment 35255

The original crank arms were reused, reducing the peddle width (Q factor??). The right hand crank had to have the chain wheel ground off, so no going back!

The battery is mounted onto the rear rack, not ideal I know. Originally I planned to mount it on the seat tube, but ordered a battery that was too long :confused: So I 3D printed a mounting to fit the rack.
View attachment 35256

The panniers are a pair of canvas messenger bags from Amazon, more 3D printing to make clips to mount them on the rack and straps because they got in the way of my heels when they were full.

I ordered my motor kit with the VLCD6 display. It may not have the bells and whistles of the VLCD5 but it has all the functions you actually need and it looks much better on the bike:
View attachment 35257

I opted for the legal 250W, 36V kit and I'm very glad I did. The bike doesn't feel like a moped (well maybe a bit like my old Raleigh Runabout), but now the Pashley feels like my Ridgeback tourer to pedal, but with 50% more speed :). It's amazing how quickly it reaches the 25kph limiter - in fact, I've selected the 45kph limit now as my comfort speed is around 28kph and the motor cutting in and out was frustrating.

I've only covered 150Km so far (one down side of the VLCD6 - it's only KM) so it's too early to really review the motor, but so far I'm really enjoying being able to cycle the 22Km (220M climb) to work every day in around 1 hour. The round trip (44Km) uses about 50% of my 12Ah battery using levels 3 & 4 assist most of the time, but most impressively, the bike feels exactly the same when pedaling with the motor turned off.

Hopefully I'll have more to say about the motor in a few hundred Km.
I was directed to your post as a response to a plea I made for anyone who had experience of adding electric to a Pashley Sovereign; you have done a wonderful job of keeping the original Pashley look, absolutely well done! I only saw your post after I had decided (or it had been decided for me!) to get another bike for my aim at the LeJoG before I turn my toes up but I still have the Pash so if trundling round the Norfolk lanes gets too much in the future I think I'll get someone with the right skills to do a similar job. Thanks for the inspiration.
 

E-Pashley

Finding my (electric) wheels
Apr 23, 2020
12
14
Thanks for all the positive comments guys.

I now have over a thousand miles since the conversion and all is still going well. The only changes I've made are to fit a new (heavy duty) chain and the straps on the panniers have been relocated for aesthetics and convenience, the battery is now less visible and the straps are easier to release.

Battery range seems good, using higher power settings for my 35 mile commute with power to spare and 100 miles along the canal path using lower power settings.

The only issue with the motor was its tendency to slacken off at the bottom bracket (well documented with this motor). After a few attempts I seem to have the lock nut tight enough - I had to get over my fear of snapping something and use a hammer on the end of the spanner.

Looking forward to another year in the saddle now.