NATO Forces Test Bultaco Electric Bikes for Fast Response Applications

JoshW

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Invited by the SEADA, the Morón Air Base in Seville was the site of a historic event in which representatives of more than 10 Armed Forces and Security Forces had the opportunity to ride existing Bultaco Brinco models, and prototypes.


Link to the full article.


What do you think to idea of forces application for electric bikes? Think they're currently looking at a fast response applications.

 
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anotherkiwi

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nemesis

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I owned a Bultaco Brinco for a short time in 2016,the battery range wasn`t good enough if you used the power ( 20 miles ) and the rear hub motor made a lot of noise on acceleration,sold it to a mx rider who used it on the track for quiet practice.
 

flecc

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What do you think to idea of forces application for electric bikes? Think they're currently looking at a fast response applications.
With short range and where to charge problems I think it's a daft idea. This is definitely an application for petrol bikes, pollution is irrelevant in conditions where firearms or explosives may be used.
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LeighPing

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With short range and where to charge problems I think it's a daft idea. This is definitely an application for petrol bikes, pollution is irrelevant in conditions where firearms or explosives may be used.
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As a veteran, I can see where this might be militarily beneficial. Route signing to the forward edge of the battle area, or putting a sniper closer to the target, as examples. A 'stealthy' 20 miles around that area, between command posts, where they could be put back on charge, or have a fresh battery installed, is no small distance. Unless, you're on foot with 6 stone of gear.. o_O

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flecc

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As a veteran, I can see where this might be militarily beneficial. Route signing to the forward edge of the battle area, or putting a sniper closer to the target, as examples. A 'stealthy' 20 miles around that area, between command posts, where they could be put back on charge, or have a fresh battery installed, is no small distance. Unless, you're on foot with 6 stone of gear.. o_O

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Nothing that a small four stroke off-roader couldn't do. Getting to sniper range wouldn't be stealthy enough to avoid detection, a bike rider is a pretty obvious prominent target. I think the charging or battery change difficulties in operational conditions would be severe, we aren't even very good at laying on any charging facilities in peacetime.

I'm also an army veteran who was fortunate enough to have his own Matchless G3L bike allocated for three years while in an army trials team.
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LeighPing

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Nothing that a small four stroke off-roader couldn't do. Getting to sniper range wouldn't be stealthy enough to avoid detection, a bike rider is a pretty obvious prominent target. I think the charging or battery change difficulties in operational conditions would be severe, we aren't even very good at laying on any charging facilities in peacetime.

I'm also an army veteran who was fortunate enough to have his own Matchless G3L bike allocated for three years while in an army trials team.
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Getting into position all depends on the terrain of course. No heat plume either. Something that, I daresay, wasn't accounted for back in the King's own musketeers and fixed bayonet yeomanry eh? :D
 
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flecc

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Getting into position all depends on the terrain of course.
Why bother these days when a drone can just take out a position?

Something that, I daresay, wasn't accounted for back in the King's own musketeers and fixed bayonet yeomanry eh? :D
Before muskets and bayonets! My foreign surname means Arrowsmith, the arrows we made were our contribution to the arms race. ;)
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flecc

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So that's where the username Flecc comes from.
Yes, Flecc from Flecchia (Italian)

French is Flecher

Spanish is Flecha

English is Arrowsmith, or Fletcher which is an anglicised version of the Old French or Norman-French Flecher. That would probably be where the TV series Porridge got the first name of Norman Stanley Fletcher from for Ronnie Barker's character.

Though the German and Austrian Fleischer and Fleischmann look similar, they mean Butcher (Flesh man).
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EddiePJ

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If the military were looking at electric bike options, I'd have thought that the Ubco would make a better choice.

Plenty of cargo capacity, two motors, and if the system operates independently including batteries, the chance of being stranded through failure, might be reduced.

It does seem daft them even looking, when you already have military spec bikes such as the Rokon.

 
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Wicky

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Looks like the intended use is more in support roles i.e Police & military base security patrol / response rather than front line combat from reading the linked article.

Not sure what motorcycles militaries use now that a pedelec could compete against / supplement , but IIRC KLR650, Rotax Armstrong-CCM/Harley D, Cagiva 350 were commonly used.
 
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