Plug and play kits

electric.mike

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 16, 2007
342
49
grimsby
Are they really that simple to fit,can someone who does not understand most of the technical advice on here fit one,please dont assume i am selling my self short.
I dont consider myself thick i do digital photography and use photo shop for processing and before retiring i was a depot manager for crown paints,but unless no metal boxes need opening and there is only one option as to where a plug fits the chances are i would cock it up,i glaze over mentally at electronics.
If so which kits are the best.
Thanks
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
Unfortunately, there are no plug-an-play bikes. It's the bikes that make kits difficult. If you show a picture of your bike and one that shows the handlebar layout, plus one from underneath thr bottom bracket to show the cranks, we should be able to advise which is easy to fit.

Assuming an easy to fit bike, the new kits from BMSBattery look really nice (and easy):

http://www.bmsbattery.com/36v/678-bottle-ebike-battery.html

Then choose a motor-wheel. The 500w Bafang CST looks good.

The Bafang BBS01 os also very easy to fit if you don't need much power.
 

electric.mike

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 16, 2007
342
49
grimsby
Thanks,i dont have a bike but had thought i could possibly find one that had the required features to make a kit easy to fit,the right bottom bracket and fork width ect to make the mechanical side easy, so long as the kits really where plug the red plug into the red socket ect,
Not looking to save money or go fast just a winter project with possibly £250 ish for the bike and £500-600 for the complete motor kit including battery.

mike
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
The easiest donor bikes have cable disc brakes, a hardtail and a large triangle frame. Avoid bikes with Octalink bottom brackets unless you don't mind upgrading the crank to hollowtech (about £60).

If you can find a cheap bike with steel frame and disc brakes, you can fit very powerful motors if you want.

Whatever bike you get, a rear motor is better, so check that the rear drop-outs have a bit of meat around them.
 

electric.mike

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 16, 2007
342
49
grimsby
Sounds like it may be within my ability,its a lot of years since i put spanner to bike but it must still be stored in my brain somewhere
 

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
7,703
2,669
post pictures of the donor bike here, members will point out what to watch out for.
In my experience, BBS01 is the only plug and play kit if such things exist.
 

D8ve

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 30, 2013
2,141
1,290
Bristol
But with £7-800 you can get a new bike with warrantee.
Or a better bike secondhand?
If you are not technical why build?
 

electric.mike

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 16, 2007
342
49
grimsby
post pictures of the donor bike here, members will point out what to watch out for.
In my experience, BBS01 is the only plug and play kit if such things exist.
After just a quick read that sounds more like a plug for woosh rather than a thought out answer.
 

electric.mike

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 16, 2007
342
49
grimsby
post pictures of the donor bike here, members will point out what to watch out for.
In my experience, BBS01 is the only plug and play kit if such things exist.
Had a pop at you in public,now after having a better look and watching a vid i need to apologize in public,sorry
Mike
 
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D8ve

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 30, 2013
2,141
1,290
Bristol
Whoosh are the defacto budget buy recommendation for cheap bikes.
The crank drive kit also fits as best budget option.
It's not a plug but common response.
 

Cyclezee

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 13, 2007
6,835
1,049
They don't much more plug and play than this kit.
Komplett_HR_Anleitung_da.jpg
Just add a wheel and a bike.
However it is not a budget option, less is more.
 

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
7,703
2,669
Last edited:

jonathan75

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 24, 2013
771
197
Hertfordshire
While we're talking bbs01, can I check with folk if a) say, weak knees mean the '250 -350'w /18 a (rather than 250 w/15 a) version is recommended, and b)whether that then means no cycling on parts of mainland EU due to the ban on greater than 250 watts? Planning my conversion, also non techy, problem with chronic patellar tendinitis. Thanks
 

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
7,703
2,669
I'd go for the 350W. Nobody is going to pay any attention to the print (30mm by 7mm saying 'BBS01 36V 18A 350W' in white paint) that is on the underside of the motor. You have to turn the bike upside down to see it.
scratch out the 'W' if you like.
 
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jonathan75

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 24, 2013
771
197
Hertfordshire
Thanks. Is the 350 always a considerably greater power drain or can you run it at the lower wattage eg by selecting lesser assistance levels ? I guess I'm thinking range.
 

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
7,703
2,669
yes, you can. The 350W pulls a lot better than the 250W but you can pedal leisurely at assist level 1 or 2 for a little for speed (15-18mph). That's vey nice along the coastal roads. It has wider power range than the 250W model.
 
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