Powered axle too tight a fit

John Galvin

Pedelecer
May 14, 2014
77
2
51
Hi

I've just tried to put my new hub powered front wheel into the axle slot on my Tern Link P9 and discovered that it won't fit.
It goes in a few mm but then the lugs seem to narrow and it won't go any farther. I seem to remember this is a common problem (with American bikes??).
What's the best way to proceed - can it be 'persuaded'? Angle grinder/dremel/file?

TIA
 

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
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I'd use a file.
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
45,906
22,537
Yes, file. Bike spindles are normally 10mm, but many hub motors use 12 mm spindles.
 

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
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you'll need a small round file and a small half round, tungsten carbide grit files will do nicely but even woodworking files will do.
something like this:
 
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Alan Quay

Esteemed Pedelecer
Dec 4, 2012
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Devon
If it's steel or alluminium alloy, then a round and a flat bastard file will do the job just fine. Available from nearly anywhere.
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
Has anyone ever done it with a file? It takes long enough with a Dremmel.
 

John Galvin

Pedelecer
May 14, 2014
77
2
51
Well so far, it's going well. I have most of the filing done, only the last little bit to go.
I used a car jack to spread the forks about 10mm and the wheel will fit well.

Looking at the attached photo, you can see lugs which obviously fit into the dropouts. My question is, should the lugs go into the 'C' of the dropouts or should the axle go into the 'C' first with the lugs between the open ends of the dropouts or does it matter?

TIA
 

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trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
7,703
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usually the anti-torque washers go inside the dropout, with the lugs in the opening of the C and the cable going downward not to pull the water inside the axle. As you have had to spread the forks, in this case, it may be easier if these fat washers go outside to avoid more spreading.
 
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John Galvin

Pedelecer
May 14, 2014
77
2
51
They look like they'll go inside pretty neatly and there's not a lot of clearance between the hub motor and the bolt for the mudguard. I might take a hacksaw to that later in the project, but I'll be putting a torque arm on that lug too, so that might take care of the excess length.

Thanks
 
C

Cyclezee

Guest
Personally I wouldn't use a power tool for this sort of work and I spent 40 years using handheld rotary power tools to grind and drill a whole range of materials, acrylic, PVA, polycarbonate, ceramics, gold, German silver, stainless steel, cobalt chromium, titanium, etc., etc.

Hand files as suggested by Trex are the best tools for the job and don't rush it.
 
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John Galvin

Pedelecer
May 14, 2014
77
2
51
Having tried it, I must agree. Five or ten minutes at most and not hard work. I just have the final slivers to take off and to finish grinding down the two little pimples below the lawyer's lips.
I think i can get C washers on the way back from Dublin tomorrow and after a lick of paint, I'll be able to finish the wheel mount.