Rain gear

anon4

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 9, 2017
473
33
27
GB
#1
I am going for an interview on Monday, if I get it it means a longer commute. Battery has the range, that's not the issue here. I have some basic rain gear but I think I may get saturated on a longer ride if it's bad. Would need something to keep rain out of my eyes, I don't wear a helmet so a baseball cap will probably do the job. What I need is decent waterproofs with a hood better than my work coat, probs high vis bottoms, any other recommendations for a longer ride if it rains? Warm waterproof gloves? Overshoes? Any input welcomed
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
871
371
Basildon
#2
The weather will be fine on Monday so nothing to worry abaout.
 
Apr 22, 2017
67
37
#3
If you don't mind a 'retro' solution - a hat and a cape will keep you 100% dry and you won't get too hot underneath. Not advisable in high winds, mind.
 

grldtnr

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 22, 2012
582
51
south east Essex
#5
Cape for me. Works a treat.
At its most basic rain capes are remarkably effective ,more modern solutions as Goretex or high tech proofed fabric jackets , trousers ,hat & over shoes are a bit hit and miss, mainly because of the balance between the performance of the high tech fabrics don't always work.
If you are lucky to be able to keep a change of clothing at work, is the best option. But remember statistically ,its likely to be dry on your commute than wet.
 

anon4

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 9, 2017
473
33
27
GB
#7
Not really one for a cape, my waterproofs do the job want the same thing just a rain "suit" but a bit more hard wearing
 

L6mbt

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 1, 2019
7
0
#11
I could never get on with a Cape because of the way the wind could catch it. I use a good waterproof jacket and, rather than overtrousers which I find cumbersome, I use"Rainlegs", a Dutch product which keeps the thighs and crutch area perfectly dry.
 

georgehenry

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2015
562
163
Surrey
#12
I use trespass over trousers that are breathable water proof and cheap as chips.

I am currently using a Altura night vision jacket that is cycle specific well ventilated and available in bigger sizes that I got in a sale.

I do not think any waterproof stuff stays that way and however breathable it pretends to be leads to an element of condensation meaning that clothes underneath can get a bit moist.

If I know it is going to cane it down for my 10 mile road ride home I tend not to wear much other than undies and socks under my waterproof layer, as the wind proof waterproof stuff keeps most of the weather out and is dry in no time at home with everything else kept bone dry in my Ortlieb panniers ready for the next day.
 

GLJoe

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 21, 2017
387
37
UK
#14
Almost had a heart attack at some of the prices there. I would never spend £200 on a waterproof jacket don't care if it protects me from a tsunami lol
Well ... you know the (very true) saying on bike components:
"Light, Durable, Cheap ..... pick two."

For bike clothing, there's probably a similar one that goes something like:
"Comfortable, Functional, Cheap ... pick two."

Personally, I hardly ever buy expensive cycling gear at full retail price, however I've come to appreciate how vastly superior a lot of the top line gear is in real life compared to the seemingly bargain offerings that often look quite similar on the surface. The key is to look out for the super expensive stuff that's on a blowout sale (usually because the manufacturers made one model in some strange colour that didn't sell very well, so they have excess old stock to shift!). the only problem is that my wardrobe is now full of incredibly awesome technical clothing ... all in strange combinations of pinks, fluro greens and oranges :D
 

georgehenry

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2015
562
163
Surrey
#15
I am not quite as heavy or as tall as you but still probably around 120kg with my loaded panniers and bought an entry level off the peg Haibike hard tail mountain bike with Yamaha PW crank drive motor and have racked up a serious mileage riding to work and back including a lot of off road and have been seriously impressed by it.

I also have a rear hub old Oxygen that has also worked well. Chinese derived bikes like the Oxygen often have a one size fits all approach, usually a 19" frame and with a manufacturer like Haibike and other similar ones you will have more chance of a choice of frame sizes and a large or extra large size that is more likely to fit you better.

A good dealer is worth finding, one who will continue to look after you after you have bought your bike and one who can provide a more specialized service if you were to need it like building you a stronger back wheel.

A good dealer should be happy to let you test ride a few different bikes and systems to get a feel of what you prefer. Test riding is a must as the bike you think is perfect for you on paper is sometimes very different when you ride it.

https://www.pedelecs.co.uk/forum/th...l-2015-yamaha-7-month-1600-miles.22644/page-8
 

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