Recomendations for converting Mission Trike?

Ruadh495

Pedelecer
Oct 13, 2015
145
63
48
Hi,

A friend of mine rides a Mission semi-recumbent trike and is looking to convert to electric assist. Any suggestions on what kits might be suitable?

It's a delta trike with a solid rear axle. One rear wheel incorporates a sort of reversed freewheel so only one rear wheel is driven but both are braked from an inboard disk brake. The other rear wheel is solid. The axle is driven by a second chain which is in turn driven by a standard gear set up.

My first thought was to bypass all of that and go for a front hub motor, but the front wheel is only 16".

A crank drive should drop straight in, but I'm wary of increasing the loadings on that peculiar drive train. He also rides off sealed surfaces quite a lot (he's disabled and uses the trike as a mobility scooter) and has had some traction issues with the single driven wheel, which a crank drive would compound.

I don't think there is anything which can be done with the rear wheels without significant engineering (unless I'm missing something), so front hub kits for a 16" wheel or crank drive? Nothing less than 250W, he's heavy and not that strong on the pedals. I'd go for more power if there was any sign of the SVA process for Le1-A being sorted, this is a clear case for more wattage at the same speed cuttoff.

Battery capacity / range is less of an issue, he's not commuting, just wants some help up the hill getting back from the shops.

I don't mind assembling my own kit from parts and having done one kit build I know roughly what's needed and where it goes, but I could use some advice on specifics.

Thanks,

Roy
 

anotherkiwi

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 26, 2015
7,845
5,780
The European Union
Do you have a disabled person card over there? Does he have one of those?

If so mount a 500 W front wheel kit (16" no problem) and limit him to a reasonable speed for a delta trike with a disabled person on board.

Et voila! Instant disabled person mobility vehicle.
 

Ruadh495

Pedelecer
Oct 13, 2015
145
63
48
He's got one, but all it does here is allow him to park his car nearer the shops...

We also have two classes of electric mobility vehicle but both are more restricted than pedelec. One is allowed 8mph and the other only 4mph.

Staying within the "cycle" class is going to be best for him, he uses a lot of routes which don't permit motor vehicles. Though throttle to 6Kph might be good, then he would fit one of the mobility scooter classes when not pedalling and be allowed in pedestrian areas. Maybe. Personally I think he should be anyway, he got the trike to replace a mobility scooter so he got more exercise, which should be applauded. He can't walk far.
 

shemozzle999

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 28, 2009
2,823
685
If you go down the front wheel route you need to first identify which 16" wheel is on the trike - you can find out from the information on the tyre wall.
 
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Kuorider

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 18, 2014
371
191
Without a rear differential the trike will be difficult to steer and control under power. It will pull and over steer to the powered wheel side. Keeping it in a straight line will be tricky and tiring on cambers. So stick to front drive.
 
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Ruadh495

Pedelecer
Oct 13, 2015
145
63
48
Thanks. It looks like a front wheel kit is the best solution.

So, who does a front wheel kit in a 16" wheel for under £700? Rack battery (the frame tubes are weird too). We can put a rack over the front wheel. Apparently Mission's own kit is £700, so he'd go for that if he has to spend that much.

He's found a reduced Sparticle kit at £400, but it's the 26Volt version and might be a bit short on power.

There's also a supplier on EBay who offers 16" but they appear to be direct from China.
 
C

Cyclezee

Guest
Here is an example of a Mission trike we converted last year, this one has 20" wheels.
IMG_20150825_091158.jpg IMG_20150825_091307.jpg