That Pedelec is interesting...MODMO Saigon

WallyM

Pedelecer
Aug 10, 2020
39
18
On my search online I stumbled across this and really like it... MODMO SAIGON, the Company is an Irish one, but the Production is in Saigon, so they named it after it.
It has got some unique gimmicks like the "modules" which one can change with a quick lock such as the front basket, rack, and other stuff like child seat if one needs it.
So one doesn't have to carry that always around at all time. I like lightweight bikes, this one is 17 Kg, that's pretty good for a Pedelec.
The other tech specifications are pretty standard, 250 Watt, 51 NM Torque, but the battery capacity is huge - 630 Wh !
They promise 124 miles range...but that's with a 60 kg driver in ideal conditions. Well, realistic for me it would be rather 80-100 miles, which is well enough.
I also like that one can take out the battery easy.
Gates Carbon belt is another plus, GPS locator and tracking, Kenda Tires ex factory.
But best is the looks, it doesn't even look like an electric one.
37906
According to chat full size mudguards are included in the price, the picture is an older one.
Downside is the price of 2165,- Quid including the 11 gear Shimano gear hub I want, without it its just 1985,- but I don't like single speed.
And I would have to wait til November, but that's ok, I don't really have all the money together anyhow. So I parted from 89,- and ordered one, I can change my mind anytime still and would get my down payment back any time. (have that insured by my credit card anyway)
But since other bikes are also sold out, I don't have much hope for an early bird either.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
9,822
3,950
Basildon
What happens if it doesn't work when you receive it, or if it packs up after a week?

Did you see the reasons for fitting a front motor? "We fit a 30% larger battery." "It made the battery much easier to remove". The battery's in the down-tube!
 

WallyM

Pedelecer
Aug 10, 2020
39
18
The reasoning you mention for the front motor is indeed a bit strange :D

The company guarantees, and I asked in chat, a 14 day unconditioned return policy with money-back guarantee. It's also in the order. Rest is the usual warranties, 5 years on the aluminum frame, 1 year on all other parts. Part supply is from Berlin, but they use pretty standard parts from Tektro and Shimano which one can buy anywhere. I liked their customer service, they always answered within a few hours and satisfactory.
 

joelectric

Pedelecer
Feb 22, 2019
101
69
Motherwell
This looks dodgy, I wouldn't be parting with any money up front. It looks like an indiegogo style investment startup company without the support.
They dont even have a product to sell
 

richtea99

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 8, 2020
364
247
The Boardman HYB 8.9e pretty much matches the spec and clean design, at £2199:

10 gears, good tyres, and GPS locator via their app. No Gates belt though, and a mid-drive motor.

I'd also hazard that it's less than 17Kg - 15 or 16Kg if I remember rightly - I guess the difference is the larger battery in the Saigon. However, the Boardman works well enough for 50-60 miles in easy mode / intermittent use.

We have a Boardman, and it's reasonably well made - just be sure to check the bottom bracket bolts are tight every now and then. Battery removal is slightly fiddly, but it's better than being in the tubes.

Last thought - you'll have some residual value in a few years time, if you buy a Boardman - just because it's a known brand.
 
Last edited:

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,897
14,773
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
"We fit a 30% larger battery." "It made the battery much easier to remove". The battery's in the down-tube!
if I could fit a larger capacity battery in the downtube of my Faro, I would.
The downtube battery has the same dimensions as the battery in my Faro, 30 cells. At most, you can have 10.5AH at the moment.
That's why I make the Faro with internal or external battery.
Slick marketing yes, but is it a better bike than my Faro?
 
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Chris M

Pedelecer
Dec 31, 2018
98
127
That bike doesn't sound like the greatest deal. If weight is all important try Ribble Cycles - https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribble-hybrid-al-e-copper-standard/ . I would like to try one of these but one ebike has to be enough for most of us. I expect the amount of assistance up steep hills will be lower than I need on this bike but I don't know. Anyway I'm still very happy with my Cube bought from a local shop which is in a similar price range.
 
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joelectric

Pedelecer
Feb 22, 2019
101
69
Motherwell
That bike doesn't sound like the greatest deal. If weight is all important try Ribble Cycles - https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribble-hybrid-al-e-copper-standard/ . I would like to try one of these but one ebike has to be enough for most of us. I expect the amount of assistance up steep hills will be lower than I need on this bike but I don't know. Anyway I'm still very happy with my Cube bought from a local shop which is in a similar price range.
Looks nice but £2k for a bike with a small 7ah battery?
Battery - Panasonic 36V/250Wh, 18650GA-10S/2P.
 

WallyM

Pedelecer
Aug 10, 2020
39
18
by "ideal conditions" they actually mean "down a 125 miles long steep hill".

Gates belt is nice, lack of gearing a massive handicap.
I ordered it with the Shimano Alfine 11 gear hub, without one would be horrible indeed- even on flat terrain at higher speed the pedaling would be tremendous. Or up hill, lets face it, the 250 Watt sewing machine motor can't pull all, so a bit of leg support would probably shift me along nicely. But without a gear the strain on the knees would be uncomfortable.
 
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richtea99

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 8, 2020
364
247
Looks nice but £2k for a bike with a small 7ah battery?
Battery - Panasonic 36V/250Wh, 18650GA-10S/2P.
If you're unfit, then you probably want a big battery initially, and the weight is neither here nor there.
If you're fully fit, you need nothing - the less weight the better.
If you're half-fit (that's me), a 'small' battery is a good compromise - plenty enough for most hills & rides.

With the Ribble (and Orbea Gain & Boardman HYB 8.9e) you're paying for a lightweight assistance system, not a massive battery. They don't just look nice, they work well - for the right person in the right situation.

> Or up hill, lets face it, the 250 Watt sewing machine motor can't pull all.
I'd say a half-fit person can get up most hills with 250W. 1-in-7 hills may be trickier, but realistically most UK hills aren't 1-in-7.

I'm not being 'anti-unfit', by the way - I'm just saying don't dismiss lightweight 250W bikes without trying one. You might find it suits you, and WallyM was attracted to a light bike.

Let us know how it goes, WallyM - I hope it's a good one!
 

richtea99

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 8, 2020
364
247
At 250w of power that battery will be empty in 1 hour.
Yes, 1 hour of full sustained power.

1 solid hour is a lot of hill climbing. If you're using it at full power all the time, it's probably not the bike for you.
See my previous explanation, and consider Orbea's description (which uses the same ebikemotion system as Ribble):
- ...designed to enhance your ride, not dominate it

What really happens is that even on the full power setting you don't actually use it all (you exceed 15.5mph, you coast, you don't spin full-on). I think they quote something realistic like 25-30 miles for full assistance, and 50-60 for low assistance. And low assistance gets me up all bar the steepest of hills.

> don't dismiss lightweight 250W bikes without trying one. You might find it suits you...
Have you tried one, Joe?
 

joelectric

Pedelecer
Feb 22, 2019
101
69
Motherwell
Yes, 1 hour of full sustained power.

1 solid hour is a lot of hill climbing. If you're using it at full power all the time, it's probably not the bike for you.
See my previous explanation, and consider Orbea's description (which uses the same ebikemotion system as Ribble):
- ...designed to enhance your ride, not dominate it

What really happens is that even on the full power setting you don't actually use it all (you exceed 15.5mph, you coast, you don't spin full-on). I think they quote something realistic like 25-30 miles for full assistance, and 50-60 for low assistance. And low assistance gets me up all bar the steepest of hills.

> don't dismiss lightweight 250W bikes without trying one. You might find it suits you...
Have you tried one, Joe?
I never cycled before getting an electric bike, I was always into 2 stroke motorbikes and tuning 2 stroke scooters.
My next electric bike will be a full suspension bafang ultra mtb.
The lightweight bikes would be good when I'm on the occasional canal route, but I prefer cycling in forrest tracks, grass hills type if terrain.
 

richtea99

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 8, 2020
364
247
I never cycled before getting an electric bike, I was always into 2 stroke motorbikes and tuning 2 stroke scooters.
My next electric bike will be a full suspension bafang ultra mtb.
The lightweight bikes would be good when I'm on the occasional canal route, but I prefer cycling in forrest tracks, grass hills type if terrain.
Yup - agreed you would probably be disappointed with a 250W motor in that case. Smooth tarmac means less friction than off-roading, and therefore less power is needed. Roads are also likely to be gentler inclines. Horses for courses - I'd definitely want something chunkier for off-road too.
 

WallyM

Pedelecer
Aug 10, 2020
39
18
One can do the science and calculate that quite accurate, how to do that can be found here in this engineering website.

However, one can also use a more convenient way by using that range calculator, there are a lot of settings (as well as in real life there are a lot of conditions) and I found that a pretty good tool.

Bosch Range assistant - don't be turned off, the formulas used are universe and not just for Bosch bikes.,

And one can set battery capacity, bike and driver weight, area, road, wind, temperature and a,ot more factores.
It's fun to dot that actually.
 

Chris M

Pedelecer
Dec 31, 2018
98
127
Range is something you get to know as you get to know your ebike. The range indicator on the bike doesn't help much because it doesn't know what you are going to do next. If you have climbed solidly for 10 miles your bike will show an unrealistic low range but then if you go downhill for 10 miles it will show an unrealistic high range.

I am old and unfit with a Bosch Active Line Plus coupled to a 500 battery. I must confess I don't use ECO mode very often. I find the range is fine. I rarely do more than 20 miles in one go and therefore rarely use more than two fifths of battery capacity. I reckon I would get 100 miles out of the battery along a canal towpath but no more than 15 miles off road over my local very steep hills.
 

sjpt

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 8, 2018
3,005
2,269
Bosch Range assistant - don't be turned off, the formulas used are universe and not just for Bosch bikes.,
The range indicator on the bike doesn't help much because it doesn't know what you are going to do next. If you have climbed solidly for 10 miles your bike will show an unrealistic low range but then if you go downhill for 10 miles it will show an unrealistic high range.
I agree with both of those (stronger comment: with the silly one on the bike it's more what you did the last mile, not even the last 10 miles). Just clarifying for readers newcomers who might not realize: the web based range assistant and the bike based range indicator are very different beasts, not just two different names for the same thing.
 
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