two wheel drive

NoToneS

Finding my (electric) wheels
Nov 28, 2013
16
1
53
Paignton,Devon
Iv'e had a cyclematic power plus now for nearly a mth, its great fun, i'm now thinking I made the wrong choice of bike due to my location (verry hilly) has anybody ever done a conversion to 2 wheel drive for this cycle (or similar)
 

peerjay56

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 24, 2013
745
199
Nr Ingleton, N. Yorkshire
Iv'e had a cyclematic power plus now for nearly a mth, its great fun, i'm now thinking I made the wrong choice of bike due to my location (verry hilly) has anybody ever done a conversion to 2 wheel drive for this cycle (or similar)
Oh yes:) Cue D8veh...
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
I've built four 2WDs. Dead easy on a Cyclamatic. Get a front motor kit with a rack or bottle battery- probably easiest with a bottle battery with integrated controller. Connect the throttle to the front motor controller and the PAS to the rear, and away you go.
 

SRS

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 30, 2012
846
345
South Coast
I've built four 2WDs. Dead easy on a Cyclamatic. Get a front motor kit with a rack or bottle battery- probably easiest with a bottle battery with integrated controller. Connect the throttle to the front motor controller and the PAS to the rear, and away you go.
Do you have to ensure that each motor is being driven at precisely the same rpm or is a minor difference acceptable?

I imagine that setting em up must be like the old twin carbs.
 

ghouluk

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 11, 2013
329
11
curious - why does it matter?

(not getting the requirement for same speed for each wheel - they aren't connected, and road speed wouldn't be the same even at same motor rpm surely as gears on the back......)
 

Alan Quay

Esteemed Pedelecer
Dec 4, 2012
2,341
1,073
Devon
They are connected though, (most of the time) by the road. Within reason this will ensure that they both spin at the correct rate.
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
There's nothing to do to set them up. The Cyclamatic motor will work on the pedal sensor as before, when you feel that you need a bit more climbing power, you open up the throttle and the front motor will come in, doubling your power at full throttle.The two systems will work totally independently. TheCyclamatic motor will run just over 20 mph, so ideally, you want a motor of about the same speed (250 to 270 rpm), but any one will work, but if you have a 185 rpm one (15mph max), your bike will have the same power as it does now past 15mph, but double the power up to 15mph.

You might also be able to get enough climbing power by soldering your shunt, which will increase torque by up to 30%, or changing the battery to a 36v one, which will give more speed and torque.
 

SRS

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 30, 2012
846
345
South Coast
curious - why does it matter?

(not getting the requirement for same speed for each wheel - they aren't connected, and road speed wouldn't be the same even at same motor rpm surely as gears on the back......)
I just thought it may be beneficial to drive both motors the same speed / current rather than rear at 5mph and then try to drive the front at 15mph.

Is it not preferable to drive both motors the same? If nothing else but for a balanced life on each battery.

Gears have nothing to do with the hub drive, they are gearing your legs.
 

NoToneS

Finding my (electric) wheels
Nov 28, 2013
16
1
53
Paignton,Devon
There's nothing to do to set them up. The Cyclamatic motor will work on the pedal sensor as before, when you feel that you need a bit more climbing power, you open up the throttle and the front motor will come in, doubling your power at full throttle.The two systems will work totally independently. TheCyclamatic motor will run just over 20 mph, so ideally, you want a motor of about the same speed (250 to 270 rpm), but any one will work, but if you have a 185 rpm one (15mph max), your bike will have the same power as it does now past 15mph, but double the power up to 15mph.

You might also be able to get enough climbing power by soldering your shunt, which will increase torque by up to 30%, or changing the battery to a 36v one, which will give more speed and torque.
i was thinking the other way round would better suit my needs, i may use a toggle switch to enable either method, may also help with battery levels
 

PatM

Pedelecer
Jul 24, 2009
32
0
Maidstone Kent
You might also be able to get enough climbing power by soldering your shunt, which will increase torque by up to 30%, or changing the battery to a 36v one, which will give more speed and torque.
D8veh- what/how is this done? soldering the shunt?- I realise or presume you mean the Transistors in the controller, but can yoiu explain what you mean please?
 

peerjay56

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 24, 2013
745
199
Nr Ingleton, N. Yorkshire
D8veh- what/how is this done? soldering the shunt?- I realise or presume you mean the Transistors in the controller, but can yoiu explain what you mean please?
D8veh has posted many times on how this is done. You'll find many threads dealing with it using the search function. This thread shows a picture and brief description. HTH:)
 

PatM

Pedelecer
Jul 24, 2009
32
0
Maidstone Kent
Thanks- all understood! Didn't think the shut wire would add so much resistance. My 36v set up does 31mph off load- the battery charges to 40v initially- so being able to do a constant 18 up gradients and an easy 25 on the flat means that ill gain little at the expense of a flat battery, range-wise. Its too wet to go and get my front-hub dirty/full of water- when it dries up, Ill need to do a range test then balance the benefit of 'shorting the shunt'
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
Don't short the shunt. Just solder 25 to 30% of the length. If you short it, the current can double.

Shunt wire has virtually no resistance otherwise it would get hot. A typical value is between 0.001 and 0.005 ohms. Soldering makes it even less.
 

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