What to do, what to do.

P4ul

Just Joined
Feb 19, 2018
4
1
3
63
Wiltshire
#1
Hello all.

I am on the point of getting my first e bike and being just under 6ft and 110kg had decided on a Woosh Bigbear. It would be used for a 16 mile round trip commute with a quarter mile steep hill.

Then I found pedelecs forums and started to gain a bit more understanding of what can be involved in choosing what to do/buy. Found that I could convert the 26 inch mountain bike (rusting in my garage) that was really comfortable, by adding a motor. Front or rear?? Decided on front with just a ‘go’ switch as I think it will encourage me to put a bit more effort into pedalling but drag me up the hills. I read on here somewhere that front wheel motors might spin due to weight at the back (particularly in my case!) in the wet, any comments - suggestions - help?

Thanks
 

rower

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 12, 2018
65
2
8
33
Berks and Bucks
#2
Being a male of similar size and weight who pulled the trigger on an ebike late last year (the one I have might suit you - see the signature - as it's a rear hub motor and I do about the same distance every day, and the exact same price as the bigbear when accounting for the mandatory tyre upgrade), I'd definitely give a 'proper' ebike a test drive. They're free to do so you've nothing to lose. Go from a supplier (either a chain like Decathlon or a smaller retailer like East Sussex Electric Bikes) that you're geographically close by so you can take it back for repairs and maintenance.

If you're mechanically minded doing a conversion could work for you too, but having the peace of mind of having an under-warranty ebike is worth the cash IMO. Any 'proper' ebike from a reputable manufacturer is perfectly safe in the rain. Just don't do what I did and neglect cleaning/oiling the chain for a few months to avoid annoying squeaking!
 
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P4ul

Just Joined
Feb 19, 2018
4
1
3
63
Wiltshire
#3
Thanks for the reply, had not even heard of your bike, it looks just the job. I will go to a retailer and have a ride before I do anything else. Thanks again Rower.
 
Nov 10, 2014
1,123
93
83
64
West Wales
#4
Front hubs can be 'interesting' in certain conditions. Many lanes around here have moss and green slime on them. This makes hill climbing technical, there can be some wheel spin on steeper bits. The same is true for loose surfaces. I find that putting my weight forward over the bars mostly does the job. I've also fitted a Carradice handlebar box (carries gloves,glasses tool kit etc.) which helps a bit.
The problem is minor and is easily adapted too. Front hub and rack battery spreads the weight, i think.
The wife has a Big Bear LS and is not an expert rider. She has never come to grief because of the front hub.
 

Warwick

Pedelecer
Jun 24, 2015
613
42
28
#5
I hadn't experienced front wheel slip until I converted my Orbit hybrid. It's set up with high-ish bars, so a relatively upright riding position; i.e. most of the weight is on the rear of the bike. I get wheel slip with my Marathon + tyres when going uphill in cold weather, but only when putting power down after negotiating a barrier, for example. The rest of the time, the power is put down fine.

You mentioned converting an MTB. I think your riding position should be putting the weight further forwards and you would have thicker, grippier tyres (Marathon + tyres do not grip well in the conditions I mentioned above). Avoid a rear rack battery and I think you would be OK. It all depends on how you set up the bike, of course.
 

Nealh

Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
6,095
120
113
55
West Sx RH
#6
Unconventionally I put a bpm in a mtb 26" front wheel the bpm kit was excess to requirements so did it for a winter off road project. I have used it on the North/ South Downs and in between generally works quite well though wheel slip is there on very soft or loose inclines, I can overcome most of the slip by standing up to peddle with my weight placed forward. My set up is made a bit more difficult as the down tube battery central weight is cancelled out by panniers carrying an extra battery/batteries and other kit.
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
#7
Hello all.

Found that I could convert the 26 inch mountain bike (rusting in my garage) that was really comfortable, by adding a motor. Front or rear??
Show some photos of the bike - handlebar layout, rear gears, complete bike from both sides and the forks/drop-outs.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
#9
Your bike looks perfect for conversion with just about any kit. I'd fit a rear motor and frame-mounted battery. At 110kg, you really need a high torque motor, like the Bafang BPM or the 48v SSWX02 kit that Woosh sell.
 

P4ul

Just Joined
Feb 19, 2018
4
1
3
63
Wiltshire
#10
Your bike looks perfect for conversion with just about any kit. I'd fit a rear motor and frame-mounted battery. At 110kg, you really need a high torque motor, like the Bafang BPM or the 48v SSWX02 kit that Woosh sell.
Thanks for the reply. Can you clarify, the Bafang BPM is front wheel, the SSW rear, which has the most useable torque in my situation? You suggest rear would be better for me so that is the SSW, can a novice install this fairly easily - I can use a spanner and am moderately intelligent.
Cheers, Paul
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
8,642
140
113
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
#11
we sell the BPM kits mostly in rear wheels (laced to 26", 650B and 700C rims).
The reason that the factory built Big Bear has the motor at the front is down to customers cannot be relied on to check their spokes.
The BPM can deliver a huge torque with the 20A controller, if the spokes are loosened, they can break. The other risk to the rear spokes is hitting potholes. Both risks are increased if the rider is heavy. By placing the motor at the front, the suspension softens the shock to the spokes. As they say, the proof of the pudding etc, after about a thousand of Big Bear sold, there have ever been a couple of broken spokes as far as I am aware.
 
Dec 30, 2016
277
25
43
51
London
#12
One guy on here has a rack and panniers over the front wheel of his big bear.
 

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