Help! Wheel removal

Jackvinrouge

Just Joined
Apr 13, 2019
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Hi All, Need to remove rear wheel on my Viking Harrier. It has a disc brake and I cannot figure out how to get the wheel off. Anyone out there had this problem?
 

Andy-Mat

Esteemed Pedelecer
Oct 26, 2018
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459
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Hi All, Need to remove rear wheel on my Viking Harrier. It has a disc brake and I cannot figure out how to get the wheel off. Anyone out there had this problem?
Posting a few clear pictures may help others to help you further!
Mine is/was very simple to do, but if you have the motor in the rear wheel assembly, you have to know both the correct method for disassembly and even more important the final assembly must be very tight, as if you get that wrong, its possible on some bikes that the axle will revolve and rip out all the power and hall effect cables from the motor!!! On some, that may turn the motor into a piece of junk!!
Many have experienced that!!! But me not yet!!
Repairing a rear wheel puncture can be done without removing the rear wheel on most bikes, as long as no oil or grease gets on the inner tube, as it rots rubber.....
I bought a special bike stand that holds the frame for me at the correct height for working as my back is not very good anymore!
Not expensive, around 30 UK Pounds. That way a puncture is no problem.
Some people, to give them a smaller chance of a puncture, cut a small piece out of a worn out tyre, and fit the rest between the tyre on the bike and the tube, so that a thorn/or nail has a longer distance to cover, so to say.
Cut off just enough to leave an inch or so "overlap", as once pressure is added, that will be taken up from the slack point. I hope that makes sense....
regards
Andy
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
9,822
3,943
Basildon
That's quite a difficult, one compared with most. I think you mean band brake rather than disk brake. The main problem is the horizontal drop-outs, which means that the mudguard has to be freed to get the wheel out backwards. Here's what you do. It's easiest to do with the bike upside down resting on its saddle and handlebars.

1. Remove the screws that hold the rear mudguard stays. Hopefully, that'll give you enough wiggle room, otherwise you have to loosen anything else holding the mudguard.
2. Undo the small bolt that holds the brake's torque arm to the LH chainstay. You should see a little clamp around the chainstay. The bolt is underneath the clamp.
3. Undo the two axle nuts.
4. Discinnect the motor connector.
5. Slide the wheel out backwards, leaving the brake cable attached.

That's what I do, but it means you have to work restricted by the brake cable. If you need more space, you have do undo the cable clamp nut on the brake at the end of the cable, but that means you'l need to adjust the cable afterwards and might even need a new inner, which is about £2 from Wilkos.

Why do you need to take the wheel off? In case you don't know, most punctures can be fixed with the wheel in place.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
9,822
3,943
Basildon
Posting a few clear pictures may help others to help you further!
Mine is/was very simple to do, but if you have the motor in the rear wheel assembly, you have to know both the correct method for disassembly and even more important the final assembly must be very tight, as if you get that wrong, its possible on some bikes that the axle will revolve and rip out all the power and hall effect cables from the motor!!! On some, that may turn the motor into a piece of junk!!
Many have experienced that!!! But me not yet!!
Repairing a rear wheel puncture can be done without removing the rear wheel on most bikes, as long as no oil or grease gets on the inner tube, as it rots rubber.....
I bought a special bike stand that holds the frame for me at the correct height for working as my back is not very good anymore!
Not expensive, around 30 UK Pounds. That way a puncture is no problem.
Some people, to give them a smaller chance of a puncture, cut a small piece out of a worn out tyre, and fit the rest between the tyre on the bike and the tube, so that a thorn/or nail has a longer distance to cover, so to say.
Cut off just enough to leave an inch or so "overlap", as once pressure is added, that will be taken up from the slack point. I hope that makes sense....
regards
Andy
Some useful info there, but I wouldn't advise anybody to use a stand to remove and reinstall a wheel with a hub-motor. It's almost impossible to get the wheel back in properly unless you have one of those relatively expensive stands that allow you to rotate the bike upside down and hold it there. You can't do that on any of the cheap ones.