Which ebike for £2500 to go for early morning rides?

Carlbiker

Pedelecer
Aug 22, 2020
78
5
So I’ve seen that Scott, Cube, Bergamont seem good brands but availability is an issue. I read mixed reports on these bikes, like cube 625 is too heavy, clunky gears etc better with a hybrid 500 etc. Which other brands are good or which is best?

Im fairly fit but have a slipped disc and thinking this might give me the cardio I’m missing, I can’t run atm because of my bike but can survive 5 aside football now and again and still play pretty well.

I prefer the more meaty looking bike like the cube cross rather than than the very thin tyres and would like to ride on roads, grassy parks and a bit of off road too.

sorry if I’m vague but I’m totally new to ebikes and desperate to get one.

do these require a lot of knowledge for maintenance?

i live in Leeds and noticed the cube depot is actually In Halifax

cheers guys
 

sjpt

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 8, 2018
2,094
1,551
There are a lot of bikes that would do you very well for a lot less then £2500; look at https://wooshbikes.co.uk/ for example. Availability is limited there too.

There isn't much extra maintenance on an e-bike; not much you can fiddle with. A crank drive will need new chains and chainrings more often than are regular bike. If anything does go wrong with Bosch and similar systems after warranty it is likely to be a slow and very expensive job.
 
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Carlbiker

Pedelecer
Aug 22, 2020
78
5
Register, post, buy.
23 hours.
God knows what you're like when you're decisive. :)

Welcome!
Haha thats a fair observation that one! Been looking for months and never been able to find one in stock anywhere but thanks to a thread here I discovered the Halifax cube supplier!

It was a gamble, especially since I’ve a slipped disc but its looking good atm, I went out twice yesterday as the weather was perfect and did 20 miles overall but feel I could have done loads more!

think I’ll get a new seat and some mirrors next.

The worse thing was I crossed over a motorway roundabout discovered it was a bit iffy with the dual lane linking into the roundabout and not being able to see if there’s a car in the other lane coming up until the last second; if they weren’t to see a biker then would get messy!
 

Carlbiker

Pedelecer
Aug 22, 2020
78
5
Which type of bag would fit the bike? I’ll buy that tool set thanks but dont have a clue to be frank, I’m off camping on the weekend, don’t even have w puncture repair kit so any advise is most welcome on what to take!
 

richtea99

Pedelecer
May 8, 2020
139
104
Which type of bag would fit the bike? I’ll buy that tool set thanks but dont have a clue to be frank, I’m off camping on the weekend, don’t even have w puncture repair kit so any advise is most welcome on what to take!
Bag - for tools, or more?

1. Under-saddle bag - something like:
And fill it with some basics:
- multitool
- tyre levers
- puncture repair kit
- spare tube
- whatever is needed to get your wheels off (nothing if they're quick release, as the description in your link suggests)
- disposable gloves if you don't like oily hands!

Also , a mini-pump (mount on the frame).

Your local bike shops or Halfords will sell you these, and advise you too.
That's about £60 worth, and gets you the basics for any trip, and you just leave them on the bike (if not in an urban area, obvs).

If you don't know how to fix a puncture (not clear from above - I'm not being rude, honest!), then consider Slime or similar temporary fix - nasty stuff, but gets you out of a corner. Again, your local bike shop or Halfords will sell it to you. Long term, it's better to learn how to fix punctures.

2. Panniers. I can't really advise on panniers, since I don't recognise the pannier rack, but again your local bike shop will be happy to help & sell you something suitable. However, panniers will cost you a fair bit more than a small under-saddle bag (£50-100), but you'll be able to carry waterproofs, fleeces, snacks, etc.
For example:
No guarantees either fits - just suggesting the sort of thing you might want to consider. Make sure you get waterproof ones. Not clear if the second set are - 'water resistant' doesn't sound the same as 'waterproof' to me.
 
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Carlbiker

Pedelecer
Aug 22, 2020
78
5
Bag - for tools, or more?

1. Under-saddle bag - something like:
And fill it with some basics:
- multitool
- tyre levers
- puncture repair kit
- spare tube
- whatever is needed to get your wheels off (nothing if they're quick release, as the description in your link suggests)
- disposable gloves if you don't like oily hands!

Also , a mini-pump (mount on the frame).

Your local bike shops or Halfords will sell you these, and advise you too.
That's about £60 worth, and gets you the basics for any trip, and you just leave them on the bike (if not in an urban area, obvs).

If you don't know how to fix a puncture (not clear from above - I'm not being rude, honest!), then consider Slime or similar temporary fix - nasty stuff, but gets you out of a corner. Again, your local bike shop or Halfords will sell it to you. Long term, it's better to learn how to fix punctures.

2. Panniers. I can't really advise on panniers, since I don't recognise the pannier rack, but again your local bike shop will be happy to help & sell you something suitable. However, panniers will cost you a fair bit more than a small under-saddle bag (£50-100), but you'll be able to carry waterproofs, fleeces, snacks, etc.
For example:
No guarantees either fits - just suggesting the sort of thing you might want to consider. Make sure you get waterproof ones. Not clear if the second set are - 'water resistant' doesn't sound the same as 'waterproof' to me.
Cracking price on that last bag, shame I can’t get it before Saturday when we go off on our jollies!
 

Carlbiker

Pedelecer
Aug 22, 2020
78
5
Register, post, buy.
23 hours.
God knows what you're like when you're decisive. :)

Welcome!
you will laugh at me this time.....so I stumbled across Leeds urban bike park 3 days ago and learned mountain biking is way more fun than cycling and also the nice bonus of no cars!

So I just returned my bike and they kindly loaned me


Until stock arrives in 2 weeks at which point I need to decide on this bike for 3.7k or:

https://www.ukbikesdepot.com/m163b0s983p39863/Electric_Bikes/Mens_Full_Suspension_Electric_Mountain_Bike/CUBE_Stereo_Hybrid_160_HPC_SL_625_27_5_2021 for £3.7k too.

ive really got the bug for this it seems ever since I completed a red trail and had to go down a steep incline which I was totally unprepared for but somehow didn’t fall off despite doing absolutely everything wrong!

I think the cube has the better spec and is carbon (better fork?) but then it has 27.5 wheels and I kind of like the 29 ones If the Orbea although very limited experience
 

RobF

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 22, 2012
4,732
2,308
The Cube does have a better spec on paper, but the Orbea might be cheaper to look after.

Replacement parts for the Cube's Sram Eagle groupset are very expensive.

A consideration given that some mountain bikers seem to wear chains and cassettes quickly.

The bigger battery on the Cube is a plus point, as might be the Kiox display if you like onboard gadgets.

Both bikes have four piston brakes, but I would go for Shimano on the Orbea over Magura on the Cube every time.

The Cube's frame is part carbon which might help compensate for the heavier battery, although neither bike will be light.

Both are very nice bikes, as they should be for the money, and both should give lots of riding pleasure.
 
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Carlbiker

Pedelecer
Aug 22, 2020
78
5
The Cube does have a better spec on paper, but the Orbea might be cheaper to look after.

Replacement parts for the Cube's Sram Eagle groupset are very expensive.

A consideration given that some mountain bikers seem to wear chains and cassettes quickly.

The bigger battery on the Cube is a plus point, as might be the Kiox display if you like onboard gadgets.

Both bikes have four piston brakes, but I would go for Shimano on the Orbea over Magura on the Cube every time.

The Cube's frame is part carbon which might help compensate for the heavier battery, although neither bike will be light.

Both are very nice bikes, as they should be for the money, and both should give lots of riding pleasure.
Thanks, would you be able to give a rough yearly maintenance cost as an idea? I’ll call them today about the battery as I’m sure he said it was 625. I can’t find anywhere regarding the weight of the bikes.

The Kathmandu might have been part carbon too but it weighed a ton whereas the Orbea seems easier to man handle for some reason, I’m yet to test the Stereo
 

RobF

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 22, 2012
4,732
2,308
A rough yearly maintenance cost is impossible to give because there are so many variables.

As an example, an Eagle cassette is a minimum of about £140, and you can pay as much as £300.

The Sunrace cassette on the Orbea is about £70.

That differential may be repeated elsewhere, although you could put cheaper bits on the Cube.

Looks like you are in danger of becoming confused over the specs.

The Cube Stereo in your link is part carbon with a 625wh battery.

The Ornea is ally with a 500wh battery.

Not sure where a Cube Kathmandu comes into it.
 

stevenatleven

Pedelecer
Apr 18, 2011
173
122
Fife
There are a lot of bikes that would do you very well for a lot less then £1000;

You might like this store
Methinks you're trolling
 
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richtea99

Pedelecer
May 8, 2020
139
104
Wholesalers, so an inappropriate attempt to promote the brand, agreed. From their FAQ:
Q4: What the minimum quantities for each order?
A: We accept trial order for item,customized order need to double check based on different items, ranging in 100-1000pcs.


This is their second posting of the same ilk. I've reported them.
 

AndyBike

Finding my (electric) wheels
Nov 8, 2020
23
5
Topeak make a nice rack pack with fold out panniers, so theyre tucked away till you need them. The simplerack pack itself looks nice and stylish, and if you use a topeak rack too, it all slots in.
You've got a nice bike, why spoil the looks with a couple of panniers hanging on the side 24/7.
A review here.
 

Carlbiker

Pedelecer
Aug 22, 2020
78
5
I took my bike back and bought an Orbea wild in the end, then crashed into a tree, now I’d like a levo!! When I repair!


I’ve added some maguru Mt7 brakes,I could get the bike to slow down enough on descents, so aggressive!
 

georgehenry

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2015
960
871
Surrey
Trees are very unforgiving!

I had a spectacular off myself some years ago on my old acoustic mountain bike cutting just a little too close to a tree and catching it with the edge of my shoulder after which my bike and were spread across the trail.

I did not cut so close to trees after that!
 

Moss

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jan 18, 2021
10
5
A good choice, I looked at them for my wife; but she didn't like the high front, even on the 15inch frame, so we decided on either a Ribble ALE or a Orbea Gain E, but in the end bought a Carrera Crossfuse E-Bike; and that suits her size wise; although she's not used it yet, waiting for warmer and dryer days.