Woosh Rio crashing in style

WheezyRider

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 20, 2020
760
387
Ouch, hope you are ok. Why though, were you riding on the pavement? Was it supposed to be a shared cycle path?
 
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Brittas

Pedelecer
Jun 27, 2020
46
17
I had just come off the road to miss traffic lights ( where I had had previous issues lol) and was about to filter back on road.
 

Brittas

Pedelecer
Jun 27, 2020
46
17
And I thought the footpath was for pedestrians, Cyclists complain when peds step out in front of them and then go and ride on pavements, you cant have it both ways.
Where I live countless cyclists seem to only use the pavement. I occasionally use it to negotiate dangerous junctions. More car drivers should be commuting via bike then things wouldn't be so dangerous on the roads
 
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Ocsid

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 2, 2017
286
196
78
Hampshire
And I thought the footpath was for pedestrians, Cyclists complain when peds step out in front of them and then go and ride on pavements, you cant have it both ways.
Well, first I am very conscious of pedestrians, and their priority as on shared ways, but still use footways in certain areas where as a cyclist one would have to have a death wish to mix it with the motorised vehicles.
Despite the illegality, a modicum of sense is needed and that is generally so, the issues really come with the prat that speeds along with no respect for anyone else. I have totally loss count of the number of police vehicles that pass me using one particular footway, never ever raising an issue and I assume thinking "here is one brighter that a lot out there".
 
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PP100

Pedelecer
Feb 28, 2020
249
145
Well obviously that signpost was clearly moving towards you faster than you were riding so it was at fault .
 
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jimriley

Pedelecer
Jun 17, 2020
226
139
And I thought the footpath was for pedestrians, Cyclists complain when peds step out in front of them and then go and ride on pavements, you cant have it both ways.
His Mum has only just taken his stabilisers off and he isn't allowed on the road yet. (a go to remark if pavement psyclists give me grief).
 

georgehenry

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2015
1,060
940
Surrey
I thought you could use a pavement, with due consideration for pedestrians, if it allowed you to avoid part of a route that you believed was too dangerous. I do occasionally, but by due care I mean slowing to a stop if necessary, using my tring tring bell, smiling and saying hello. etc etc.
 

tonyw

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jun 21, 2019
23
10
I thought you could use a pavement, with due consideration for pedestrians, if it allowed you to avoid part of a route that you believed was too dangerous. I do occasionally, but by due care I mean slowing to a stop if necessary, using my tring tring bell, smiling and saying hello. etc etc.
Not legally, no.
 
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Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
12,982
5,063
57
West Sx RH
I think it was Flecc who pointed out that when Paul Boateng was Minister Sec of State affairs 1998 that he put out an edict/statement citing that cyclists could use pavements with care if they felt they were put at risk by road users or felt vulnerable at certain places, it wasn't a cart blanch to ride on pavements but under certain circumstances was down to authorities to use common sense in enforcing.
 

PP100

Pedelecer
Feb 28, 2020
249
145
I think it was Flecc who pointed out that when Paul Boateng was Minister Sec of State affairs 1998 that he put out an edict/statement citing that cyclists could use pavements with care if they felt they were put at risk by road users or felt vulnerable at certain places, it wasn't a cart blanch to ride on pavements but under certain circumstances was down to authorities to use common sense in enforcing.
It was prompted by over zealous use of Fixed Penalty Notices:
  • Fortunately, when FPNs were introduced for pavement cycling in 1999, Home Office Minister Paul Boateng issued guidance saying that: "The introduction of the fixed penalty is not aimed at responsible cyclists who sometimes feel obliged to use the pavement out of fear of traffic and who show consideration to other pavement users when doing so. Chief Police Officers who are responsible for enforcement, acknowledge that many cyclists, particularly children and young people, are afraid to cycle on the road, sensitivity and careful use of police discretion is required".
    [*]The Home Office guidance was re-affirmed in 2014 by the then Cycling Minister Robert Goodwill, who agreed that the police should use discretion in enforcing the law and recommended that the matter be taken up with the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO). ACPO welcomed the renewed guidance, circulated it to all forces, and issued a statement referring to "discretion in taking a reasonable and proportionate approach, with safety being a guiding principle".
    [*]To summarise, cycling on the pavement is still an offence, but there is clear guidance that the police are supposed to exercise discretion.
    [*]And finally on pavements, remember that on segregated cycle tracks the pedestrian side remains a footway, so if you cycle into the pedestrian side to pass a pedestrian in the cycle lane you technically commit a pavement cycling offence. There's an anomaly because cyclists have to ride on their side, but pedestrians are only advised to use theirs.
    [*]