Delimit Carrera Crossfire E

The Smiler

Just Joined
Aug 23, 2020
4
2
Hi all
i have monitored this thread for some time, I have not managed to make the crossfire go faster as such, but I have made it far more efficient. I ride a lot, about 7000 miles a year on all sorts of bikes, so my riding style is one of a high cadence and little pressure. I took a new job and as it was 20miles each way decided to by the crossfire, I was happy at first, but soon became disappointed as it just didn’t suit my riding style. So what I have done is convinced the bike I’m putting in more effort, so my bike now wants to help more. This has increased my average speed, lowered my journey time. Now there is more drain on the battery, but I’m still only having to charge it every other day. And all I’ve done is removed 2 springs from the crank.
so if you pop out to your bike hold the back brake on, push down on the pedal, is there a small amount of movement ? If yes than this is how your bike registers your torque input, and you can do the following to increase your bikes input, and therefore increase efficiency.
1 remove the torque sensor, from behind the crank, using a ph1 screwdriver
2 remove the chain and crank, using a crank puller - don’t us a hammer !
3 once you have the crank, undo the 4 alum bolts, using a 5mm key
4 you will be able to see 5 springs, remove 2, this is awkward but can be done.
5 reassemble your bike, being careful with the torque sensor, make sure it goes back in the correct place, and is located correctly.
6 enjoy
 
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egroover

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 12, 2016
605
328
54
UK
Hi all
i have monitored this thread for some time, I have not managed to make the crossfire go faster as such, but I have made it far more efficient. I ride a lot, about 7000 miles a year on all sorts of bikes, so my riding style is one of a high cadence and little pressure. I took a new job and as it was 20miles each way decided to by the crossfire, I was happy at first, but soon became disappointed as it just didn’t suit my riding style. So what I have done is convinced the bike I’m putting in more effort, so my bike now wants to help more. This has increased my average speed, lowered my journey time. Now there is more drain on the battery, but I’m still only having to charge it every other day. And all I’ve done is removed 2 springs from the crank.
so if you pop out to your bike hold the back brake on, push down on the pedal, is there a small amount of movement ? If yes than this is how your bike registers your torque input, and you can do the following to increase your bikes input, and therefore increase efficiency.
1 remove the torque sensor, from behind the crank, using a ph1 screwdriver
2 remove the chain and crank, using a crank puller - don’t us a hammer !
3 once you have the crank, undo the 4 alum bolts, using a 5mm key
4 you will be able to see 5 springs, remove 2, this is awkward but can be done.
5 reassemble your bike, being careful with the torque sensor, make sure it goes back in the correct place, and is located correctly.
6 enjoy
Mmm, not sure I follow this...'more drain on the battery', 'it's now more efficient' ??? Either way, if you're getting 80 miles (40 mile round trip, charging every other day), then you are doing really well, and putting in loads of your own effort, and/or you are the size of Willie Carson. The most I could get out of my Crossfire-e on reasonably flat roads in calm conditions on eco mode only was about 50 miles
 

The Smiler

Just Joined
Aug 23, 2020
4
2
Mmm, not sure I follow this...'more drain on the battery', 'it's now more efficient' ??? Either way, if you're getting 80 miles (40 mile round trip, charging every other day), then you are doing really well, and putting in loads of your own effort, and/or you are the size of Willie Carson. The most I could get out of my Crossfire-e on reasonably flat roads in calm conditions on eco mode only was about 50 miles
What I meant was the motor is now more willing to help, as it thinks I’m putting in more effort. After 2 days I used to have about 15% left, now it’s flashing on 8%. I do a lot of cycling and I understand my range will be higher than most, but it has improved the bike in my opinion, so I thought I would offer what I’ve done to others. I would be interested to hear feedback from anyone who tries this, and remember you can put the springs back in.
 

egroover

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 12, 2016
605
328
54
UK
What I meant was the motor is now more willing to help, as it thinks I’m putting in more effort. After 2 days I used to have about 15% left, now it’s flashing on 8%. I do a lot of cycling and I understand my range will be higher than most, but it has improved the bike in my opinion, so I thought I would offer what I’ve done to others. I would be interested to hear feedback from anyone who tries this, and remember you can put the springs back in.
Ahh I see, apologies, it's giving greater assistance or kicking in that assistance earlier with less effort from the rider, yep I can see that it would use more battery with less range as you have found. I might try this, did you remove opposite springs?
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
9,800
3,899
Basildon
Explanation of how the torque sensor works and photos here:
 

The Smiler

Just Joined
Aug 23, 2020
4
2
I removed 2 opposing springs, and found the difference insanity noticeable, the motor is keen to kick in and seams to go on a bit longer. I can cruse at 16.4 and just hear the motor. So I thought ‘what happens if you remove another spring’
with 3 removed, the bike becomes aggressive and it seams to lose its rid ability, as the motor is like an on off switch, so I put that one back in lol.
I would welcome any feedback from anyone who tries it. Also I’m in Berkshire if anyone wants to try mine first.
 
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Michael Love

Pedelecer
Aug 26, 2018
155
32
56
I removed 2 opposing springs, and found the difference insanity noticeable, the motor is keen to kick in and seams to go on a bit longer. I can cruse at 16.4 and just hear the motor. So I thought ‘what happens if you remove another spring’
with 3 removed, the bike becomes aggressive and it seams to lose its rid ability, as the motor is like an on off switch, so I put that one back in lol.
I would welcome any feedback from anyone who tries it. Also I’m in Berkshire if anyone wants to try mine first.
Just got a notification, and I was thinking if doing this, so superb that it can be done and the flag moves more/further easier.
I will be doing the same to mine ASAP.
Thank you.
 
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The Smiler

Just Joined
Aug 23, 2020
4
2
Would be great to know if anyone has followed me and done this, would love some to know if anyone else thought it improved the bike
 

pvgolfer

Just Joined
Dec 9, 2020
3
0
Lever them out.
I took my crankset assembly apart and found that the springs are riveted in. Rather than prying the springs out by breaking the rivet, I just left them in and reassembled the whole assembly.
After taking the bike out for a test ride, I found that the bike motor seemed to provide more assistance than prior to taking it apart. In fact, I noticed that the power meter on the display would light up all bars (to the top of the display) in SPORT mode. Prior to the disassembly/reassembly, I recall that the power display would only go up about halfway. I never knew that the power assist indicator could go all the way up the display.

I suspect that when I reassembled the set, I loosened the two concentric rings which provide a torque measurement to the torque sensor. This allows transmitting the full torque signal to the torque sensor with the same amount of pedal effort as before the reassembly.
 

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