Woosh Gran Camino

Lancs Lad

Finding my (electric) wheels
Sep 23, 2021
24
6
These are initial findings and I will update again after I’ve put a lot more miles on the bike or found any other important points for potential purchasers to consider.
I’m writing this because I struggled to find any user reviews for this specific model and figured it might help somebody else in the future decide if this bike is for them. Woosh get lots of support on this forum but there’s a total lack of reviews, promotion and publicity so I presume they are content to remain small and focused.
Ordering experience - I rang and had a chat with Hatti and decided to go with the Gran Camino and was told it would be a couple of weeks until the bike would be built as they worked through order backlogs. I was kept up to date on when the bike was going to be built and dispatched. I wasn’t charged until the bike started being built and this was 2 weeks after ordering. The bike was dispatched on the following Monday morning and reached me on the Wednesday morning.

Packaging and set up - the bike was well packed inside it’s huge box. Good instructions provided in how to unpack the box and bike without damaging it. It is a two person job to remove it from the packaging but didn’t take too long and the bike only required the handlebars and pedals to be attached. Everything worked straight out of the box. The only issue I have is a slightly untrue front wheel and the front mudguard rubbing on the wheel.due to it being slightly bent. I’m guessing that the box might have been laid on its side at some point in its journey to cause some of this. Mudguard still a bit wonky but mostly sorted with a bit of tinkering with the fittings. The front wheel is fine to ride but I might get it looked at by a local bike shop, although it may not be worth the hassle as it rides fine.

First impressions from riding - first of all it feels like a well built piece of kit. The gears haven’t missed a beat so far. The motor seems to pull really well and I’ve only found one hill that it really struggled with where it slowed down to 6 mph and I was actually feeling the strain (but if anybody knows Preston it’s the hill from Avenham Park to Ribblesdale Place- it’s a short but brutal hill). Other than that I have found the motor great. It kicks in quickly and isn’t too jerky in how it applies the power.
The power settings for the motor are simple to use and can apparently be customised however you like. So far I’m sticking with the 5-level presets but it can be set with your own levels (up to 9 levels).
There is a throttle lever that can only be activated after you’ve started peddling (to keep it legal). I believe I’m not the only one that thought it wasn’t working because it has an on/off switch that doesn’t jump out at you when you’re sat on the bike. The throttle, whilst not essential, is a nice touch and allows you to cruise along whilst having a rest from peddling.
It also has a switch to lock out the front forks whilst you’re riding. Great if you find a lovely flat piece of tarmac and don’t want to lose any energy being transferred downwards into the forks. However, with the state of roads and cycle paths around Lancashire,having the front forks working is the best option. I’ve not tried anything close to off roading yet and probably won’t until the spring but the front forks take any skittishness out of uneven ground and have helped travelling over cycleways littered with tree debris after heavy winds.
The brakes seem to do the job although the roads have been damp and greasy since I got it so I’ve not felt able to test them to the max. My most recent experience of hydraulic brakes was riding a Cannondale Adventure Neo 2. The brakes don’t feel as strong as those did but maybe they had been scrubbed in and to be fair the bike is £3200 so a direct comparison is a bit unfair.
The bike is comfortable to ride and hasn’t give me any problems with my aching joints. I get a bit of numbness in my fingers after 5 miles but I get that on any bike, not sure if it’s medical or the shocking state of roads and cycle paths round here.
The lights aren’t integrated so they need batteries, which is a shame, but probably another reason why the bike is reasonably priced. The front light isn’t very powerful and probably needs an upgrade if you ever cycle in areas without street lighting. I cut through a pitch black park the other night and I had to slow right down because I couldn’t see more than a few feet ahead. I imagine that most inbuilt bike lights are probably next to useless so it isn’t a big problem. I’ll probably try to get a hi-beam to attach to my handlebars to provide additional help.

Aftercare - Woosh have been quick getting back to me with answers to any questions I have which makes you think it is a company that understands the importance of good customer service. Like any product you get a true measure if anything goes wrong but so far all things point towards a company that looks after customers.

Overall - although I wasn’t even aware of the existence of Woosh a few months ago I’m glad I was recommended them by other forum users. The specs on the bike are really good and the materials used seem to be good quality with well proven parts used. Yes there are undoubtedly better ebikes out there but in order to get a better bike than the Gran Camino you’re going to have spend a lot more money than Woosh are asking for. When you look at similar priced bikes from large scale manufacturers that you can pick up for £1399 you’ll struggle to find the same level of equipment both in the standard elements of the bike and in the battery / power unit. I sold my car at the start of 2020 lockdown as I was enjoying the quiet roads and the clearer air. Admittedly as life has started returning to normal, I was missing not having a quick transport option. The Gran Camino has returned my resolve to try and continue without a car. For 90% plus of the journeys I make the bike is nearly as quick as a car. My daily 1.3 mile trip to visit my parents takes 5-6 minutes each way as opposed to a 25 minute walk. Being able to get there in 5 minutes makes life easier and means I can get there fast in any emergency.

I think that’s all the main points covered for now. If anybody has any questions about the user experience that I haven’t covered then please ask. Providing it’s not technical I’ll be happy to give an honest opinion. I’m sure Woosh will answer any technical questions that anybody wants to pose.
 

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Jodel

Pedelecer
Oct 9, 2020
115
107
Thanks for the quick review, it's always good to hear of 'real world' experiences from actual users of various bike models. I'm glad to read that you're enjoying the new toy. Hopefully the weather allow you to get out and about a bit more to put a few miles on it.
 
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Lancs Lad

Finding my (electric) wheels
Sep 23, 2021
24
6
Just to give an update on the bike. I’ve not done too many miles but I’m coming up to 700 and it’s still running. It even survived a crash that left me with stitches, road rash and bruises without suffering any problems at all. All in all it has been a wonderful replacement for a car so I’m doing my but for the environment and getting a bit of exercise too.
Only issues are a slight noise when the motor hits about 12.5 mph that isn’t there either side of that speed. And an occasional click from the crank when I’m peddling which disappears as soon as you try to show it someone else.
but I’ve used it pretty much every day for at least a couple of miles since getting it in all kinds of weather and it hasn’t let me down so far. Going to spend a little time this week doing some degreasing and relubing stuff and I’m sure it’ll run even smoother
 

Lancs Lad

Finding my (electric) wheels
Sep 23, 2021
24
6
Thanks for the quick review, it's always good to hear of 'real world' experiences from actual users of various bike models. I'm glad to read that you're enjoying the new toy. Hopefully the weather allow you to get out and about a bit more to put a few miles on it.
Sorry for the late reply. Please see below for a small update. All in all it seems like a sturdy piece of kit and I’ve found it to be easy to get on with. Comfy bike and the battery kind of last how long you’d expect it to depending on the assistance you dial in. If you have it on level 5 you will never get the 60 miles suggested but if you have it on level one you should manage ok. Just be warned that it is a heavy old lump so pedalling without much assistance (especially if you’re a heavy old lump too) can slow you down a lot.
On the whole though I use my bike for most journeys now and on journeys under 5 miles it isn’t much slower than a car.
 

Lancs Lad

Finding my (electric) wheels
Sep 23, 2021
24
6
I'm still choosing the right bike and can't decide. I really like to travel But there is not always time for this when you are studying at the university. Thanks to the site https://www.topessaywriting.org/samples/astronomy I learned about essay examples and it made my study easier. Now I have time for cycling.
Well I hope that find something that you like. Good luck with the studies.
 

Jimod

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 9, 2010
1,060
632
Polmont
Sorry for the late reply. Please see below for a small update. All in all it seems like a sturdy piece of kit and I’ve found it to be easy to get on with. Comfy bike and the battery kind of last how long you’d expect it to depending on the assistance you dial in. If you have it on level 5 you will never get the 60 miles suggested but if you have it on level one you should manage ok. Just be warned that it is a heavy old lump so pedalling without much assistance (especially if you’re a heavy old lump too) can slow you down a lot.
On the whole though I use my bike for most journeys now and on journeys under 5 miles it isn’t much slower than a car.
Can I ask? Does it have a torque sensor or a cadence sensor?
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
16,985
6,638
59
West Sx RH
GC is cadence sensor, one can see that from the pics. Magnet disc is visible through the chain ring.