New Biker

Footie

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 16, 2007
549
10
Cornwall. PL27
I have never ridden an electric bike before (I always jump in at the deep end) so these are my first impressions of my new electric bike.
The first 200-yard ride, along a quiet side road, was impressive. Slow speed, so power from the motor was very evident. Pushed me along nicely. Big grin all the way.
There was very little noise from the motor, but then I’m partly deaf so that doesn't count.
Out on the main town road the speed was much higher so the power was less noticeable. I forgot about using the gears (too busy messing about with the throttle) and stopped more than once with them still in top. This made pulling away very difficult – had to stand on the pedals to get going.
The power from the motor does not kick in from a stand still, you must be moving first. I will have to practice more as the correct use of the gears seems paramount for the whole thing to work smoothly. Not simply a get on and wind back the throttle.
I didn’t like the speed bumps, as I was concerned with the battery being shaken loose. However, I was worrying unnecessarily as it stayed put the whole time.
The lights are impressive and should be more than capable of doing their job. I like the handlebar button. If I press it twice, fast, it’s almost like I’m flashing my lights – I love gadgets :cool:
The power indicator, on the handlebars, is not what I expected. It’s all red lights (bit strange) and they drop down to ‘low’ when I full throttle it. They go back up if I ease off. I presume the indicator is telling me what power I have available.
I never got to try any hills. It was a very short try-out as the weather got the better of me (didn’t have a coat) and when the rain started to fall I made a dash for home.
So yes I’m pleased with it, and looking forward to putting it through it’s paces :)
Steve
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
45,940
22,581
Thanks for the report Steve, forgetting to use the gears like that is a very common thing when first "going electric", it just seems irrelevant at the time! :)

The battery meter is only that, but it will only indicate with any accuracy what's in the battery if you shut off the throttle, or when you're at a standstill.

The reason for that is that it works by measuring the small decline in voltage as the charge is used up, but when you open the throttle, the current draining into the motor also drops the voltage, so giving a false reading at that time.

Therefore, to check what's in the battery when running on the road, shut the throttle momentarily before you look at the meter.

Hope you have many years of trouble free enjoyment from your bike.
.
 

Branwen

Pedelecer
Oct 2, 2007
97
1
Does anyone have any info on the Izip’s? Steve
I should be test riding one soon, the izip trekker. The shop is calling me as soon as it comes in so I will post a review. It's a lithium battery hidden in the frame, though, which means it cant be removed. I am wondering about leaving the charger on the communal stair to recharge it... seems like a thief could have bike and charger away all in one go, maybe.
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
45,940
22,581

I am wondering about leaving the charger on the communal stair to recharge it... seems like a thief could have bike and charger away all in one go, maybe.
That does sound really dodgy Branwen. Is there a bannister rail or post you could lock it to possibly?

Alternatively, you could fit an alarm like this one.
.
 
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Footie

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 16, 2007
549
10
Cornwall. PL27
Update on bike

Hi All,
I thought I would post an update on the fun I’ve been having with the electric bike.
I’ve had the bike about six months now. Been trying to get out on it whenever I can. The regular four-mile trip to Tesco’s (the other side of the valley) has been a challenge, especially as I have to contend with the two (long) steep hills. But the bike and I are managing it.
Not gone any further than about five miles so far – the hills knacker me before I get anywhere. The legs are still weak and although I had a stent put in my confidence took a serious bashing when I had the heart attack – so I don’t like to go too far on my own (what a wuss, eh).
Anyway, the self-imposed five mile limit is getting easier and easier. So I may look to increasing it a little. There are some interesting back roads, which I’m sure will prove worthwhile re-discovering (not been on them for about twenty years).
As a bit of a test the other day I cycled up to the downs - 4 miles all up hill - that really got the motor warm and the power lights went down to one (lowest I have ever seen it).
I seem to have got the hang of the gears and motor and when they are in balance (which is most of the time) everything runs very smoothly.
Somehow I have managed to avoid riding in the dark, so far, so not been able to test the lights. I’m sure they are adequate.
The back brake is still binding (a bit) but not like it was and I can now cycle comfortably in the lower gears without the aid of the motor.
It’s not the fastest of bikes. Even going down hill has its limits. In many cases I find I’m going faster than the gears, even down moderate hills and have to stop peddling and free wheel. Can be a bit embarrassing, as I always seem to want a bit more speed. At least there’s not much chance of me being caught speeding :)
Recharging has been simply a case of plugging in as soon as I get home. Two to three hours later the green light is on and the battery is charged.
I have ridden in the wet and there’s no problem at all. The tyres grip well and the brakes stop me.
I was interested to read how flecc uses the pavement when things get a little tight. Not done that yet. I always thought it was illegal to ride on pavements - Has the law changed?
I have had a number of encounters with pushy drivers trying to beat me to the road islands but I simply take charge of the road and make them wait. It’s got a few of them mad. Unfortunately, none of them has had the guts to stop, yet, so we can discuss the Highway Code in depth :)
Although I am very happy with my Cougar Mountain Electric Bike, I will be interested to here Branwen’s review of the izip trekker.
Keep safe,
Cheers for now.
 

coops

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jan 18, 2007
1,225
1
Manchester U.K.
Thanks for the update Steve & glad you're getting good use of your bike :).

I'm not sure the izip trekking is the same kind of bike as the izip you were considering, but I think the hub motor izips are quite low powered bikes.

Branwen said:
It's a lithium battery hidden in the frame, though, which means it cant be removed. I am wondering about leaving the charger on the communal stair to recharge it... seems like a thief could have bike and charger away all in one go, maybe.
Yes, that does sound a bit dodgy...

You mentioned that you're also interested in the Agattu pedelec? The Izip trekking looks to be of very similar weight & price: even the battery is the same spec and to be honest the peak motor power is probably much the same too (maybe less than the agattu), except of course with the agattu that power is available in any gear, while the izip has a hub motor.

I don't know about each bike's components, but on the face of it the agattu offers far better value for money to me :) plus the battery is removable and quite light - around 2.2 or 2.4kg I think?

P.S. Though maybe you wanted to try something different from your lafree? :) Thanks for the tip on winter base layers by the way :).

Stuart.
 
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Branwen

Pedelecer
Oct 2, 2007
97
1
The izip is £1400 I was told, very similar price as I will miss the 10% off deal by the time I find somewhere to travel to that has a demonstrator for the Aggattu. Despite the battery placement problem for charging I will probably test ride it and write it up anyway.
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
45,940
22,581
I was interested to read how flecc uses the pavement when things get a little tight. Not done that yet. I always thought it was illegal to ride on pavements - Has the law changed?
No, there's no change in the law, but if used for a nearside pass of a parked car when there are no pedestrians at all near and it avoids impeding motor traffic, I think it's acceptable. I have done it when a police car has benefitted and there's been no reaction. They probably just interpreted it as what it was, just a common sense full use of facilities.
.
 

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