Step through, dutch style around £1000

SanPat

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jun 3, 2020
9
3
I'm looking to get myself my first Pedelec, I've got the Cyclescheme £1000 via work to purchase one with.

I'm a 52 year old female, not a big bike rider, got myself a push-bike last year and really enjoy being out on it but do struggle with hills due to respiratory conditions and the bumpy canal towpath have left me with a sore backside for days with my second-hand bike! But I am hoping with a bit of assistance in my bike I will get out and about more and use it when I got into the office. I am quite tall, 5ft 7 with a 33inch inside leg so need a bigger bike frame/wheels.


Originally I was looking at the Pendleton Somerby from Halfords, then I found the
B'TWIN ELOPS 900 E STEP OVER from Decathlon before I came across this site and found out about some others.

From reading posts on here I am now stuck between:

1. Juicy Dutch Style Electric Bicycle - Classic Click, online £1,085.00
2. Woosh The Santana 3 £1,099, Santana-CD £1,099 or Crusa £849 online.
3. Wisper 705 SE Step-Thru 375Wh 26-Inch £1,050.00 from a local dealer who I have just paid a visit and found very unhelpful...... they didn't have any in their showroom.

Aesthetically I prefer the Juicy and I have been told they are available in July. Not sure when the others will be available as yet!

Ideally, I would prefer to try one out first but in the present circumstances that is proving to be difficult. I went to Decathlon the other day and they had nothing left in store to look at and out local Halfords is click and collect only.

I think I would like something with some suspension though and the seat definitely needs to be comfortable.....

Thanks for any advice.

Sandra
 

Amoto65

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 2, 2017
667
433
57
Cheshire
Any of the 3 above are good, I have owned a Juicy and a Wisper and both have been great, I have not ridden a Woosh however they have a good reputation on here.
 
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Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
14,691
11,882
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
Woosh Dutch style ladies bikes are out of stock until 15-July.
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
14,691
11,882
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
that's a good idea to sort out the admin aspect well before the bikes arrive. Please ask Hatti to assist.
 

Cazann

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jun 10, 2020
6
1
I am in a similar position. I live in Devon & it is very hilly. I would like a pedelec to commute to work, but after a hip replacement and several foot operations, feel I need good assistance with hills. I want to buy a good make but realise I am clueless. I qualify for the cycle scheme as I work for the NHS. Could I add my own money to it to make it up to 1500? I would like a step-through torque. Can anyone advise me please? Much appreciated for your help & experience.
 

Audio2

Pedelecer
Apr 5, 2015
79
38
77
Are you sure you want torque sensing, you have to put in significant effort to get power from the motor. It feels more like an ordinary bike with legs that are 20 years younger. The alternative is cadence sensing which if you are tired will allow you to ghost pedal & get you home.
 
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Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
14,691
11,882
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
I qualify for the cycle scheme as I work for the NHS. Could I add my own money to it to make it up to 1500?
yes.
I would like a step-through torque.
How tall are you?
If you are 5ft8 or above, the Rambla may be worth a look:


 

Cazann

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jun 10, 2020
6
1
Hi, thanks for your replies. I am only 5ft 4in and nearly 65. I thought I had read that The torque system was better for helping you up hills and delivers a more sensitive response to power requirements. But I am completely new to this, so looking to be advised. Many thanks
 

Cazann

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jun 10, 2020
6
1
Are you sure you want torque sensing, you have to put in significant effort to get power from the motor. It feels more like an ordinary bike with legs that are 20 years younger. The alternative is cadence sensing which if you are tired will allow you to ghost pedal & get you home.
Are you sure you want torque sensing, you have to put in significant effort to get power from the motor. It feels more like an ordinary bike with legs that are 20 years younger. The alternative is cadence sensing which if you are tired will allow you to ghost pedal & get you home.
I am not at all sure I know the difference. I thought I had read that The torque system was better for helping you up hills and delivers a more sensitive response to power requirements. But I am completely new to this, so looking to be advised. Many thanks.
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
14,691
11,882
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
for your height and age/stamina, the Santana3 is much better.
You don't have to pedal harder to climb a hill like you would with a torque system like the Rambla.
The torque system is nicely sensitive but you have to pedal harder and faster when climbing a hill.
The Santana3 lets you pedal as much or as little as you like, there is also a throttle to help with starting off quickly at traffic lights or on a slope.


 

Cazann

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jun 10, 2020
6
1
for your height and age/stamina, the Santana3 is much better.
You don't have to pedal harder to climb a hill like you would with a torque system like the Rambla.
The torque system is nicely sensitive but you have to pedal harder and faster when climbing a hill.
The Santana3 lets you pedal as much or as little as you like, there is also a throttle to help with starting off quickly at traffic lights or on a slope.


Hi, thanks for your reply. What sort of range do these cover and do they come in varying battery power?
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
14,691
11,882
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
What sort of range do these cover and do they come in varying battery power?
The Rambla comes with 36V 14AH battery ( 504WH) and will give about 50 miles from a full charge.
The Santana3 comes with 15AH or 17AH battery (you choose) and will give about 50 miles (15AH) or 60 miles (17AH). You get a bit fewer miles per WH because you tend to be less sporty with a cadence system compared to a torque system.

Q: Also, could I ask how difficult is it to put together once it arrives?

You have to put the pedals on and adjust the handlebars. They get taken off when packing. We can send the bike to a bike shop near you, they'll do that for you for a small fee.