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Woosh Scirocco 2 - independent review

Discussion in 'Electric Bicycles' started by RobF, Feb 4, 2013.

  1.  
    RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

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    Here's my review of the Woosh Scirocco 2, the company has had no other input other than supplying the bike.


    MANY buyers will be drawn to the Scirocco 2 due to its long list of equipment and relatively cheap price.
    But is this a bike which looks good on screen, but performs poorly on the road, or a happy mix of both short and long term appeal?
    First impressions out of the (very large) box were better than I expected.
    The bike arrives assembled apart from the need to bolt on the handlebars and pedals.
    Interlink assessed the package as 32kg, that includes the very large box and fairly compact charger, but the Scirocco could not be described as lightweight.
    The bike feels sturdy and well-made, the mudguards and carrier look as if they are made to last, and the frame looks bomb-proof.
    I'm not a fan of black bikes, but the paint appears thick, lustrous and didn't seem prone to scratches or chips in the six weeks of the test.
    Finishing kit is average, but mostly branded and includes the latest Shimano Revoshift gears and Kenda puncture resistant tyres.
    On the road they roll better than I expected, and provided useful grip during the slushy and muddy conditions of the test.
    The ride of the bike is comfortable and reassuringly free from rattles, except over all but the nastiest of potholes.
    Handling of a bike of this size is never going to be nimble, yet the steering is sharp enough for tight manoeuvres and stable enough for the rider to make hand signals and backward glances without wobbling.
    The motor whines a bit from cold and also when under load, but is relatively quiet at other times.
    There's three levels of assistance of which level two is probably the one most users will use most of the time.
    I liked it a lot, it provides a good rendition of proper cycling, cutting in and out almost imperceptibly while at the same time giving a useful level of assistance on hills.
    Level three is a bit too much in all respects, although I did use it briefly to combat an incline and nasty headwind.
    Level one? Well, it's possible for an ebike to be too much like an ordinary bike, there's barely enough assistance to counteract the extra weight.
    As regards climbing, I've ridden a few legal ebikes and would put the Scirocco's climbing ability as average for a 36v/250w set-up.
    First gear is not that low, so the one brute of a hill I tried needed a fair bit of effort from me.
    The bike handles undulating terrain in third gear or higher, second will get the rider up most hills.
    My weight is greater than my GP thinks it should be, so a lighter rider may do better.
    Battery life is impressive, on one charge the Scirocco dragged me around for 50+ miles, albeit spread over a few rides.
    There was still two/three lights showing on the meter, but power had dropped so I don't think there was much juice left.
    The Scirocco has a throttle which came into its own in the slush and on muddy grass, it enabled me to do some (almost) speedway-style power sliding - great fun.
    Lights aren't the Scirocco's strongest point, the rear is OK but runs off it's own battery, the front is more for being seen than for seeing by.
    Keeping the price in mind, it's hard to find much else to criticise, the brakes are certainly not two-finger operation, but are powerful and progressive enough when given a firm squeeze.
    The saddle is a basic gel one which I found comfortable, and it could easily be upgraded.
    The long term ownership prospects of the Scirocco - or any bike - are hard to judge.
    Most of the 'bike bits' could be serviced by any bike shop.
    Hatti from Woosh comes over well on the forum, so I reckon a Scirocco owner would get better support than from some other internet retailers.
    In summary, the Scirocco is well-equipped, looks good in the metal and rides well on the road.
    For the price - just £699 and Hatti is talking about a February sale - it's surely unbeatable.

    The Sirocco 2 | Electric Bikes from Woosh | electric bike sales & hire
    jazper53 likes this.
  2.  
    hatti

    hatti Official Trade Member

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    Thanks for what seems like a very fair review Rob, and I have noted all the points raised.
    The Sirocco 2 is certainly one of our most popular models, no doubt due to the 15A battery and its potential for slightly heavier riders (no, not you Rob!) and long distances.
    We would have liked to do a short February sale but alas due to the rise in dollar rates, this is going to be difficult - so no special offers on the Sirocco 2 or any other models for the moment.
    However we do have at our main Southend store some ex rentals - around 15 or so and including I think a couple of Sirocco 2s - so if anyone is interested in these at a good price (all with a full warranty, they just have slight wear and tear) give me a shout.

    sirocco2-right-side-800.jpg
    hd-on-sirocco2-800.jpg

    Hatti
  3.  
    SRS

    SRS Pedelecer

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    Don't know anything about Sirocco's but just like to say that the las pictured riding the bike is a stunning looking woman.
    EddiePJ likes this.
  4.  
    oigoi

    oigoi Finding my (electric) wheels

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    Thanks for the review made for interesting reading. Impressive range
  5.  
    RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

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    The test was carried out in near-freezing conditions and I used the throttle when I felt like it.

    Hard to say how much power was left, but in more favourable conditions I would be confident of getting 60+ miles.
  6.  
    RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

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    Could this be the same RobF who thinks all Chinese bikes are garbage?

    I think it might be.

    For those genuinely interested in the topic, I would add a couple of rear spokes broke after I posted the original review.

    But I'm quite a big lad - and the bike was well loaded with shopping - so I decided 'Chinese spokes made of cheese' would be unfair.

    On t'other hand, I'm not that big, so it goes to show spokes on hub motors are often operating near their limit.
  7.  
    trex

    trex Pedelecer

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    spokes break more likely because of poor wheel truing rather than weak material.
    That does not say much in favour of Chinese bikes but Chinese bikes have more 'issues' than German bikes because one side, you have the Chinese factories that prefer using whatever they already have or can source locally and the other side, European customers who try hard to communicate. Good quality parts (eg forks, drive system, brakes) have to be imported from Taiwan or Singapore (Shimano) or Europe (Sram, Rockshox, Avid), causing typically 2-3 months extra delay and negates the low cost benefit.

    didn't you do this review before you bought the Rose?
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2014
  8.  
    RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

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    I don't think I'd heard of Rose when I did the review.

    Still looks about right to me, so I wouldn't do it a lot differently today.

    I was considering making Hatti an offer she couldn't refuse - for the bike.

    But, as I mentioned in the review, I have doubts about the longevity of some of the components.

    Yes, they can mostly be replaced, but I like to tinker with my bike when I want to, not when the bike tells me to.
  9.  
    trex

    trex Pedelecer

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    can't say I disagree with you about 'when I want to, not when the bike tells me to' - common issues with Chinese bikes are not so much electrical as mechanical, albeit the spoke breaking issue is also prevalent in European rear hub bikes.
    Problems like sand in bottom bracket, worn brake pads, seized up pedals, loose bolts and nuts tend to happen earlier compared to German bikes and recently, john F reported problem with his chain. To be fair, Woosh fit Kevlar tyres to most of their bikes since the review.
    Best build your own but many can't do that. I wish more LBSs take on conversion jobs.
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2014
  10.  
    d8veh

    d8veh Pedelecer

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    We also had breaking spokes on those 24 spoke Kalkhoffs a while back, but I agree that there seems to be a higher chance of getting problems on bikes with hub-motors; however, all bikes get maintenance issues. Is it any worse to have to replace a couple of spokes on a hub-motored bike after maybe a thousand miles than it is to replace a chain and cassette on a crank-drive one? People are always pointing out weaknesses on individual bikes without looking at the bigger picture.

    Crappy bottom bracket bearings on cheap bikes is still an issue, but many of the manufacturers are now wising up, so there's not so many with caged balls now. If any are reading that haven't yet changed to a cartridge, please change soon. It'll cost less in the long-run.
    mike killay likes this.
  11.  
    trex

    trex Pedelecer

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    problem with bottom brackets may have more to do with the type of bottom bracket than the caged bearing. I suspect that the Octalink or ISIS splined BBs (as on European bikes) have much smaller gap between the crank and the bearing than the tapered squared type (as on Chinese bikes), will let less mud near and into the bearing rather than the caged balls having a lesser barrier or wearing out more quickly. The problem goes away if you have a fully enclosed chainguard like on this Woosh Sundowner.
  12.  
    superDove

    superDove Pedelecer

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    At least with a hub motor and a throttle you can still get home (or work) regardless of the state of the bottom bracket.
  13.  
    trex

    trex Pedelecer

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    sure, Chinese bikes tend to have throttle fitted.
    I still doubt they will ever match German quality/price ratios if your budget is twice the average. A bike like this Sirocco 2 costs about $600 at the factory gate, but if you have the similar mechanical components like the KTM Lycan (Fox 32 Float, Shimano SLX M675, Shimano SLX M672, Deore XT shadow plus, Shimano M520) plus nice saddle, stem, rims, spokes - the price will be more than $1700 - it's cheaper assembling the kit in London than in Tianjin.
    On the other hand, only Chinese bikes can enlarge the UK market.
  14.  
    RobF

    RobF Pedelecer

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    I hope the ISIS is well sealed.

    It may not be the Bosch system's finest point because, apparently, ISIS bearings have a smallish circumference.

    This means smaller balls (ho-ho) and fewer of them, inevitably leading to a shorter life.
    trex likes this.

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