2016 Woosh Karoo hub drive

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
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Tom,

You have Shimano roller brakes at the rear wheel of your Gallego.
I found this video, hope that helps:

 

timidtom

Esteemed Pedelecer
Oct 19, 2009
757
174
Cheshire
GambiaGOES.blogspot.com
Did you alert the seller? It doesn't sound a serious issue if it was corrected in seconds, but frustrated none the less.

What do you feel about it now it's storted?
Sadly, it wasn't sorted in seconds. I had to cart the thing round a variety of cycle shops until I chanced on the one that finally repaired the fault. I had contacted the supplier immediately I'd discovered the fault and I'm still waiting for their comment on the bike's reluctance to make way! I'd had a lovely chat with them on the 'phone before I bought it! Still, I know much more about 3-speed hubs with built in brakes!
 

timidtom

Esteemed Pedelecer
Oct 19, 2009
757
174
Cheshire
GambiaGOES.blogspot.com
Tom,

You have the rear wheel of your Gallego.
I found this video, hope that helps:

Thanks for this, Trex. The initial fault was that the cable had been clamped so tightly that the adjusters were useless. The wheel just dragged along the ground without rotating. Short sight, arthritic fingers and lack of the correct tool to slacken the clamp managed to raise my blood-pressure a notch or two! I can laugh at it now - ho-ho! Where's the cake?
 
D

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The repairer might have used a tool, but I doubt it was necessary. The bike would have been OK before it went into its box. When it was lifted in or out, someone got hold of the brake cable, and the force on it would lift the end of the black outer sleeve from it's little receiver, where it would park itself holding the brake on. It only needs a tug to remove the tension and let it drop back in.
 

cyberdyne_systems

Pedelecer
May 8, 2016
153
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Surrey
Thanks for this, Trex. The initial fault was that the cable had been clamped so tightly that the adjusters were useless. The wheel just dragged along the ground without rotating. Short sight, arthritic fingers and lack of the correct tool to slacken the clamp managed to raise my blood-pressure a notch or two! I can laugh at it now - ho-ho! Where's the cake?
Glad you got it sorted, so you like the bike now?

Chocolate!?
 

EddiePJ

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 7, 2013
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Crowborough, East Sussex
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Cant get a test ride and would like to have a look? What's it like over 15mph?
I'd say that is a difficult question for anyone to answer, as it very subjective to the riders own fitness, and what they might already be used to riding.

Gearing aside on my hilly terrain, I found the Karoo an enjoyable and pleasurable bike to ride above the cut of level.

But to view that objectively, I consider myself to be fairly fit, and I'm used to riding an electric mountain bike, that weighs in the region of 20kg, and has very aggressive off road tyres, with tyre pressure running at 18-22psi, and any cycling without assist hard work.

I realise that you are saying that you can't get to ride one, but I really would advise finding a way. :)



.
 
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cyberdyne_systems

Pedelecer
May 8, 2016
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Gearing aside on my hilly terrain, I found the Karoo an enjoyable and pleasurable bike to ride above the cut of level.
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So after assist ends does the pedal suddenly feel heavier, I'm interested to learn how the transition is.

Also if you don't mind me asking how tall are you, I'm about 5' 11", I'm hoping it will feel roomy, my old mtb feels a tad cramped. I think you're right, best to try and have a go on it.
 

EddiePJ

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 7, 2013
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I found the transition from assist to no assist okay, and the light weight of the bike and it's 700c wheels with 70 psi in the tyres must have played a massive part in this.. :)

I'm also about 5' 11" tall, and on the very first ride, the bike felt compact rather than cramped, but that feeling soon vanished, and the bike soon felt just about right.

I really find answering questions like this quite difficult though, as we are all different, and I'd hate to think that my own experience would sway someone into making a decision that might not be right for them. Trying one would definitely be the right thing to do. :)

.
 
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cyberdyne_systems

Pedelecer
May 8, 2016
153
111
50
Surrey
I found the transition from assist to no assist okay, and the light weight of the bike and it's 700c wheels with 70 psi in the tyres must have played a massive part in this.. :)

I'm also about 5' 11" tall, and on the very first ride, the bike felt compact rather than cramped, but that feeling soon vanished, and the bike soon felt just about right.

I really find answering questions like this quite difficult though, as we are all different, and I'd hate to think that my own experience would sway someone into making a decision that might not be right for them. Trying one would definitely be the right thing to do. :)

.
I appreciate your candid thoughts on the bike, and for sure I'd need to try it to see if it suits me, thanks though.

And some awesome shots you took, I'm often over those parts, very beautiful part of our country!
 
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timidtom

Esteemed Pedelecer
Oct 19, 2009
757
174
Cheshire
GambiaGOES.blogspot.com
The repairer might have used a tool, but I doubt it was necessary. The bike would have been OK before it went into its box. When it was lifted in or out, someone got hold of the brake cable, and the force on it would lift the end of the black outer sleeve from it's little receiver, where it would park itself holding the brake on. It only needs a tug to remove the tension and let it drop back in.
Sorry: this was not the case. The cable had been secured by the clamp so that adjustment or re-positioning was not possible. I am still surprised that PDI at the retailer's premises did not discover this.