Brexit, for once some facts.

flecc

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I couldn't wear one eye glass with IOL in other tho. Brain couldn't compensate for different sizes..
Yes it can and does, for your unaided eyes. Add any artifical means and it becomes a different story of course.
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Zlatan

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Yes, but it doesn't matter for the reason Danidl has given. Remember my posting that few peoples eyes are equal? The optical centre at the rear of the brain automatically compensates for such differences, intelligently interpreting what is happening and correcting for the differences.

Another example, long ago a floater appeared in right eye. Irritating at first, the brain soon omitted it from my normal vision. Some while later a floater appeared in my left eye, but the same pattern followed. Although they are very definitely there all the time and an optician can spot them immediately, I normally never register them, even though my retina is seeing them as clearly as the optician's one. In fact i can call them up to order with a trick.

The downside to this sort of complex brain compensation is that it takes time, accounting for why we can seem a bit dumb compared with the abilities of some other creatures. Everything we see in our brains is delayed behind when our retina detected them. For example many insects have, in addition to their amazing compound eyes, additional eyes called ocelli, most commonly on top of their heads. These only detect changes in movement and light, but because these signals sent to their brains are so simple, their brains can react to them with astonishing speed. It's a major reason why swatting them can be so difficult, as our movement starts they are already reacting with avoidance.
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I do agree given time the brain could compensate and work out a one combined image... but not in a few days... And that is missing point...
The simple fact was both eyes had images occupying different amounts of the field of vision. The right (as I measured) gave 32 degrees... The left.... 28 degrees. I checked, over and over again to no avail.
On the one hand it's easy to explain, if the image appears closer it occupies a larger angle/proportion of field of vision.
On the other hand the maths says the goal (I was looking at in garden) was a different height???
Hence, the conundrum.
The issue isn't whether the brain can compensate, (I didnt want it to, it would be changing again soon) The issue is how can angle viewed be different.?
There was some experiment where people were fitted with hats/glasses /mirrors to turn our world upside down. I think after 3 days the brain flipped them over... Then, when removed, world was upside down again,for 3 days..
Yes, the brain is an amazing thing but to be fair it didn't feel like different sized images would be adjusted any time soon into one cohesive image. (even tho both were sharp)
Other thing I noticed was when looking at running water. One eye saw nice clear water, other stained and slightly coloured. (I, d never noticed prior to cataract op)
You would guess fairly quickly the brain would amalgamate to a shade somewhere between the two. It didn't seem to, the water would appear streaky, some stained, some not. It was quite bewildering. Again, no doubt after a while an amalgam would be achieved..
 
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flecc

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Yes, the brain is an amazing thing but to be fair it didn't feel like different sized images would be adjusted any time soon into one cohesive image. (even tho both were sharp)
As you said, it takes time. I had to live with my first very irritating floater for almost two months before the brain made if finally disappear in all normal circumstances.

You probably know this, but cover the right eye and focus the left eye on something distant against a nearer edge. Switch eyes without moving and the object you were focussed on has move substantially to the side. Using both eyes the brain combines both into the position your dominant eye dictates. The angles of view compensation of the image that your brain shows you would probably also be dictated by your dominant eye image.
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Zlatan

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As you said, it takes time. I had to live with my first very irritating floater for almost two months before the brain made if finally disappear in all normal circumstances.

You probably know this, but cover the right eye and focus the left eye on something distant against a nearer edge. Switch eyes without moving and the object you were focussed on has move substantially to the side. Using both eyes the brain combines both into the position your dominant eye dictates. The angles of view compensation of the image that your brain shows you would probably also be dictated by your dominant eye image.
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Yep, agreed. Even the eye dominance thing is a pure data analysis issue.
I was under assumption your dominant eye looks directly at focal point and then other adjusts in to join it... Apparently not. Both eyes look directly at object but the dominant eye takes precedence for perspective, focus and proportion. The none dominant eye simply adds info where possible, fills in blind spots and aids for depth perception.
If you think about dominant eye and where it looks (apart from straight infront of itself) the eye (s) must always look exactly at object being studied.(both of them) If you like both cameras are looking at same object but the dominant picture is analysed and has none dominant eye info added.
 
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flecc

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Yep, agreed. Even the eye dominance thing is a pure data analysis issue.
I was under assumption your dominant eye looks directly at focal point and then other adjusts in to join it... Apparently not. Both eyes look directly at object but the dominant eye takes precedence for perspective, focus and proportion. The none dominant eye simply adds info where possible, fills in blind spots and aids for depth perception.
If you think about dominant eye and where it looks (apart from straight infront of itself) the eye (s) must always look exactly at object being studied.(both of them) If you like both cameras are looking at same object but the dominant picture is analysed and has none dominant eye info added.
To show the extremes of compensation, my former extreme short sightedness of the right (dominant) eye from birth, the one I called microscope, measured before the second cataract operation at 6/36 metric. Yet I'd used that in combination with my left quite normally sighted eye all my life for such as distance judgement, as well as the other extreme of its ultra close focussing ability.
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oyster

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Yes, but it doesn't matter for the reason Danidl has given. Remember my posting that few peoples eyes are equal? The optical centre at the rear of the brain automatically compensates for such differences, intelligently interpreting what is happening and correcting for the differences.

Another example, long ago a floater appeared in right eye. Irritating at first, the brain soon omitted it from my normal vision. Some while later a floater appeared in my left eye, but the same pattern followed. Although they are very definitely there all the time and an optician can spot them immediately, I normally never register them, even though my retina is seeing them as clearly as the optician's one. In fact i can call them up to order with a trick.

The downside to this sort of complex brain compensation is that it takes time, accounting for why we can seem a bit dumb compared with the abilities of some other creatures. Everything we see in our brains is delayed behind when our retina detected them. For example many insects have, in addition to their amazing compound eyes, additional eyes called ocelli, most commonly on top of their heads. These only detect changes in movement and light, but because these signals sent to their brains are so simple, their brains can react to them with astonishing speed. It's a major reason why swatting them can be so difficult, as our movement starts they are already reacting with avoidance.
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At least some of us have floaters which vary in impact due to where they are at the time. Sometimes I notice mine; sometimes not.
 

Zlatan

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To show the extremes of compensation, my former extreme short sightedness of the right (dominant) eye from birth, the one I called microscope, measured before the second cataract operation at 6/36 metric. Yet I'd used that in combination with my left quite normally sighted eye all my life for such as distance judgement, as well as the other extreme of its ultra close focussing ability.
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That is a massive difference...
I did wonder if in my case if difference in size of the images would make them harder to integrate with each other...
It actually made me dizzy and I was told in no circumstances to drive until post 2nd op..
Aligning, filling in gaps, tidying up focusing between images seems rather more possible than resizing (and doing those aswell)
I suppose eventually the brain would work something out, but even my way of coping wasn't helping. Only seemed possible to use one eye or the other... And doing so highlighted the differences (in colour and size)
Think I, ll ask my consultant. If one IOL fitted and other eye corrected with glasses how long for brain to integrate images. (with my level of myopia)???
What do you reckon Flecc
Never
A year
A month
A week
3 days
????
 

Nev

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Seem some odd decisions have been made. (Though I can understand there will be availability and distribution difficulties imposing restrictions on choices.) I'd have expected the optimum in terms of protection alone would be for a different vaccine to be used for any booster to that originally used.

If so, perhaps Israel would like some AZ for boosters?
They are not wasting any time about this, my wife (front line NHS worker) is booked in for her booster next week.
 
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flecc

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Think I, ll ask my consultant. If one IOL fitted and other eye corrected with glasses how long for brain to integrate images. (with my level of myopia)???
What do you reckon Flecc
Never
A year
A month
A week
3 days
????
This I can't guess at. From my own experience I'd say more like a month rather than a week for consistency, but we all vary so much from each other I doubt our personal experiences are valid for others.
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flecc

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At least some of us have floaters which vary in impact due to where they are at the time. Sometimes I notice mine; sometimes not.
These days I only ever see them if I deliberately call them up with eye movements beyond my norm. That could be due to having had them for so many years that I can't remember when they first appeared, It was certainly over 30 years ago, could be 40, plenty of time for the brain to perfect the way it deals with them.
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oyster

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They are not wasting any time about this, my wife (front line NHS worker) is booked in for her booster next week.
I heard about a pharmacy which was doing flu vaccinations saying they would see the person again in a few days for a Covid booster. Before the government had made any announcement.

Have to say, there is much I do not like about the booster program.

1) The government made their decision some time ago but decided not to tell us;
2) The things like half dose of Moderna, and AZ only if allergic to the others look like making it up as they go along - and I doubt they are fully endorsed by the manufacturers;
3) Last year there was talk of development of second generation vaccines - with possibly better performance/wider applicability, etc. Where have they gone?
4) Is accepting a booster better for us than ensuring those around the world who have not received any vaccine are protected?
5) What's the real story behind Valneva and the cancelled contract?

Have you all made up your minds?
 
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oyster

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These days I only ever see them if I deliberately call them up with eye movements beyond my norm. That could be due to having had them for so many years that I can't remember when they first appeared, It was certainly over 30 years ago, could be 40, plenty of time for the brain to perfect the way it deals with them.
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I too have had them for what seems like an eternity. But I still see them for at least part of every day, sometimes most of the day.
 
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flecc

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I heard about a pharmacy which was doing flu vaccinations saying they would see the person again in a few days for a Covid booster. Before the government had made any announcement.

Have to say, there is much I do not like about the booster program.

1) The government made their decision some time ago but decided not to tell us;
2) The things like half dose of Moderna, and AZ only if allergic to the others look like making it up as they go along - and I doubt they are fully endorsed by the manufacturers;
3) Last year there was talk of development of second generation vaccines - with possibly better performance/wider applicability, etc. Where have they gone?
4) Is accepting a booster better for us than ensuring those around the world who have not received any vaccine are protected?
5) What's the real story behind Valneva and the cancelled contract?

Have you all made up your minds?
I'm also unhappy about this very real lack of information. My impression is that it's out of desperation to avoid a winter surge, without any evidence that it will succeed in doing that. As things stand I'm inclined towards refusing it.

As you say, a new fully tested vaccine of proven greater efficacy would be a different matter. This measure looks more like an admission of failure by the vaccine makers.
.
 
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Nev

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Have you all made up your minds?
I will be taking the booster shot when my turn comes around. I think flecc is right though, we were told that we would likely get an up dated version of the vaccine and that hasn't happened. I am not sure why, I suspect its because they haven't been able to develop one that works better than we already have.
 
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Nev

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My impression is that it's out of desperation to avoid a winter surge, without any evidence that it will succeed in doing that.
A mates daughter who is a trained ITU nurse but works out in the community has been warned that she is extremely likely to be drafted back into ITU in the next few weeks. The same thing happened last winter, she has been told that planners are expecting a similar work load to last year which is rather worrying.
 
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oyster

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I will be taking the booster shot when my turn comes around. I think flecc is right though, we were told that we would likely get an up dated version of the vaccine and that hasn't happened. I am not sure why, I suspect its because they haven't been able to develop one that works better than we already have.
Some explanation is required - from "them".
 
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flecc

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I will be taking the booster shot when my turn comes around. I think flecc is right though, we were told that we would likely get an up dated version of the vaccine and that hasn't happened. I am not sure why, I suspect its because they haven't been able to develop one that works better than we already have.
Some explanation is required - from "them".
To explain my position on the proposed booster, the evidence in my area doesn't convince that the vaccines are anything like good enough. As mentioned a few times before, we have a very low vaccination rate which should mean suffering more from Covid, but it's the opposite, we continue to consistently do well in my London borough. Here's the data now compared to elsewhere:

1st vaccine: Nationally 89%. Croydon 67%.
2nd vaccine: Nationally 81%. Croydon 60%.

So with 21 to 22 points down on vaccination we should be doing quite badly in crowded London, but here's how well we are doing:

Testing positive per 100,000: Nationally 348. Croydon 254.

Deaths within 28 day of a positive test per 100.000:

Nationally 1.4%. Croydon 1.25%

In fact for several weeks our Croydon daily deaths have been recorded at zero, being continuously below one per day and currently down at -16.7%.

If the vaccines were so good, it doesn't make much sense does it, given our very low vaccination rate is giving better outcomes?

How can it be better? Well here's one clue:

Driving to my supermarket yesterday I passed a bus queue of 6 people. They were spread out in a long line along the pavement some two metres between each and all six were wearing a mask. It's the same in supermarkets, everyone masked.

Despite all the restrictions being lifted by the politicians, it seems our public are taking note of the continuing infection rate and taking their own precautions. Clearly here at least, masking and social separation are more effective than the vaccines, so my faith stays with that and not with more of the same vaccines.
.
 
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Danidl

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A mates daughter who is a trained ITU nurse but works out in the community has been warned that she is extremely likely to be drafted back into ITU in the next few weeks. The same thing happened last winter, she has been told that planners are expecting a similar work load to last year which is rather worrying.
You probably don't pick up on NI news, but yesterday the Health Minister there urgently requested that the MoD would send medically trained Army personnel to help contain their surge in cases. His concern is that the current staff are basically wiped out ,tired worn down and after 2 years of grind incapable of giving service.
It is not that the current vaccinations are ineffective , it is that they have to be used.
 
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Danidl

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To explain my position on the proposed booster, the evidence in my area doesn't convince that the vaccines are anything like good enough. As mentioned a few times before, we have a very low vaccination rate which should mean suffering more from Covid, but it's the opposite, we continue to consistently do well in my London borough. Here's the data now compared to elsewhere:

1st vaccine: Nationally 89%. Croydon 67%.
2nd vaccine: Nationally 81%. Croydon 60%.

So with 21 to 22 points down on vaccination we should be doing quite badly in crowded London, but here's how well we are doing:

Testing positive per 100,000: Nationally 348. Croydon 254.

Deaths within 28 day of a positive test per 100.000:

Nationally 1.4%. Croydon 1.25%

In fact for several weeks our Croydon daily deaths have been recorded at zero, being continuously below one per day and currently down at -16.7%.

If the vaccines were so good, it doesn't make much sense does it, given our very low vaccination rate is giving better outcomes?

How can it be better? Well here's one clue:

Driving to my supermarket yesterday I passed a bus queue of 6 people. They were spread out in a long line along the pavement some two metres between each and all six were wearing a mask. It's the same in supermarkets, everyone masked.

Despite all the restrictions being lifted by the politicians, it seems our public are taking note of the continuing infection rate and taking their own precautions. Clearly here at least, masking and social separation are more effective than the vaccines, so my faith stays with that and not with more of the same vaccines.
.
Finally we are singing from the same hymnal .... .
Had the Delta variant not arrived , which is 1200 times more productive in viruses than the original, then the vaccines would have almost certainly done the business and we would be back to normal.
Recall that in the very early days, it was calculated that 1 metre separation ,between two unmasked persons of equal height, one infected gave a significant probability of infection if maintained f or 15 minutes. Wearing the best quality mask by the non infected person increased this time by a factor of 20. . Both masked , same distance .. maybe 400. Doubling the distance to 2 metres increases the volume and the viral load drops by 8 . Beyond that the Maths for the plume become more complex and drop exponentially.
Well with Delta the 15 minutes of the original becomes a few seconds... .
Now the vaccine has two features .. It reduces the chance of the Non infected person succumbing at all to that same viral load by at least 10 times and probably up to 50 times, and then reduces the severity by another factor of 10.
 
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oyster

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Government spokesman:

Pounds and ounces are an easily understood and widely used unit of measurement. This is one small part of a wide-ranging drive across government to establish the right regulatory environment to support jobs and growth across the UK.

He can't even count. Pounds and ounces are TWO units of measurement.

How much growth will pounds and ounces achieve?
 

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