Brexit, for once some facts.

GLJoe

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 21, 2017
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Thanks - that is interesting. I have continued to be very unsure of a relationship.
...
The main reason for veering towards no issue is the time between vaccination and HZ. Which was something like six weeks whereas the documents suggest one week is more typical.
I was trying to listen to some very interesting podcast interviews last week, unfortunately (or fortunately ... depending on your point of view!) I was on my bike at the time, and some of the information being discussed was pretty intense, and ideally I'd have stopped, paused and possibly rewound a number of times to try and fully understand what the implications were of what was being said!

So I'm intending going back and revisiting them. I have made a note to the links to the videos here. You might also be interested, as in the first one, I recall them mentioning the mechanisms of how/why certain things like Shingles are reoccurring.
https://odysee.com/@BretWeinstein:f/Bret-Malone2:2

The next one is also fascinating, but this time is with a different Vaccinologist and is perhaps a bit more complex and esoteric, but nevertheless, pretty mind blowing stuff.
https://odysee.com/@BretWeinstein:f/a-tale-of-covid-trade-offs-vaccines-vs:1
 
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GLJoe

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 21, 2017
828
387
UK
...You might also be interested, as in the first one, I recall them mentioning the mechanisms of how/why certain things like Shingles are reoccurring.
https://odysee.com/@BretWeinstein:f/Bret-Malone2:2
I did end up watching this first one again properly earlier on.
FWIW, the shingles discussion starts at just before the 1hr 10min mark.

There is interesting general discussion (about other things) before that point, and personally, I found the whole talk utterly fascinating, but the stuff from 1.10 on is where you'd want to jump in if you are short of time and/or are only interested in the shingles/autoimmune part.
 
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Danidl

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Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
8,475
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This might be of interest:

https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:506291-2020:TEXT:EN:HTML

Its a tender from our MHRA, dated October 2020.
Its for an AI software tool.
I quote from part of the document:
"
Explanation:

For reasons of extreme urgency under Regulation 32(2)(c) related to the release of a Covid-19 vaccine MHRA have accelerated the sourcing and implementation of a vaccine specific AI tool.

Strictly necessary — it is not possible to retrofit the MHRA’s legacy systems to handle the volume of ADRs that will be generated by a Covid-19 vaccine."
Whats the point?. Obviously when a major new rollout affecting 50 million people was happening, the older IT needed upgrading. If anything ,and looking at the date of that tender, they were a bit tardy... The Oxford vaccine was going into large numbers of arms within a month of that date
 

oyster

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2017
10,144
14,230
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Whats the point?. Obviously when a major new rollout affecting 50 million people was happening, the older IT needed upgrading. If anything ,and looking at the date of that tender, they were a bit tardy... The Oxford vaccine was going into large numbers of arms within a month of that date
Equally obviously, the systems they had were NOT up to the job.

If they had properly taken lessons from Operation Cygnus, they should have appreciated the need to manage data on that scale (though developments in technology certainly occurred since).

I suspect no-one lifted a finger to improve preparedness until Covid was actually rampaging. Then it became super-urgent.

Why, even a problem with a typical annual flu vaccination campaign would likely have overwhelmed what they had. (Imagine an issue which took a few months to develop but affected a large proportion of those vaccinated.)
 
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GLJoe

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 21, 2017
828
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UK
Whats the point?. Obviously when a major new rollout affecting 50 million people was happening, the older IT needed upgrading.
Its not obvious at all. If the vaccines were indeed 'safe and effective' as we were constantly being told, then being safe, there would be little or no side effects to report, therefore an existing adverse events reporting system would have little or no additional volume to cope with.

However, look again at the wording of the tender:
"it is not possible to retrofit the MHRA’s legacy systems to handle the volume of ADRs that will be generated by a Covid-19 vaccine"

Not 'might be generated'. WILL be generated.
 

oyster

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2017
10,144
14,230
West West Wales
Its not obvious at all. If the vaccines were indeed 'safe and effective' as we were constantly being told, then being safe, there would be little or no side effects to report, therefore an existing adverse events reporting system would have little or no additional volume to cope with.

However, look again at the wording of the tender:
"it is not possible to retrofit the MHRA’s legacy systems to handle the volume of ADRs that will be generated by a Covid-19 vaccine"

Not 'might be generated'. WILL be generated.
The MHRA must have some historic evidence as to how many ADRs they have received for other new products - vaccines and other types.

Projecting that onto something like 50,000,000 first-time doses would almost certainly have produced a number in excess of anything they had previously seen.

Remember, many ADRs are repetitious and report relatively mild issues.

Yes, I do think there were substantial issues. But I don’t think getting a suitable computer system in place to allow for large numbers of ADRs - even if they put it in terms of “will” - is proof that they knew there were going to be large numbers of serious ADRs.
 
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flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
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You may remember long ago how I was completely missed from inclusion in the first Covid jab program and had to belately chase for it, ending up getting mine in a two decade younger group.

And then how exactly the same happened for the second jab, getting mine at 14 weeks after the first, way past any recommended interval.

And the same for the booster, which I later very much regretted that I'd chased for.

But suddenly and miraculously the NHS have remembered I exist for a second booster, too much so. I've just received a THIRD posted envelope urging me to get that. All three letters over three weeks were identical and all bore my NHS number. Surely that alone in a suitable computer system should prevent duplication and triplication?
.
 
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oyster

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2017
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You may remember long ago how I was completely missed from inclusion in the first Covid jab program and had to belately chase for it, ending up getting mine in a two decade younger group.

And the how exactly the same happened for the second jab, getting mine at 14 weeks after the first, way past any recommended interval.

And the same for the booster, which I later very much regretted that I'd chased for it,

But suddenly and miraculously the NHS have remembered I exist for a second booster, too much so. I've just received a THIRD posted envelope urging me to get that. All three letters over three weeks were identical and all bore my NHS number. Surely that alone in a suitable computer system should prevent duplication and triplication?
.
And I have just found that my booster vaccination has disappeared from my GP records! We have very limited facilities but one I did notice a few months ago was the vaccinations - and I'm sure it had all three. But no longer.
 
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Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
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Its not obvious at all. If the vaccines were indeed 'safe and effective' as we were constantly being told, then being safe, there would be little or no side effects to report, therefore an existing adverse events reporting system would have little or no additional volume to cope with.

However, look again at the wording of the tender:
"it is not possible to retrofit the MHRA’s legacy systems to handle the volume of ADRs that will be generated by a Covid-19 vaccine"

Not 'might be generated'. WILL be generated.
Not obvious to you apparently!. Now your definition of safe and effective is also skew... At the time of writing that specification the KNOWN MORTALITY rate from COVID19 was off the order of 5% ... . And before you go off on a tangent go back to the then published information .. of which the best regarded was the John Hopkins university data of deaths in people with a confirmed Covid diagnosis, so even a 1% notifiable reaction would have been a statistical improvement ,if the mortality rate was to be 1/100 of that.
 
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Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
8,475
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You may remember long ago how I was completely missed from inclusion in the first Covid jab program and had to belately chase for it, ending up getting mine in a two decade younger group.

And then how exactly the same happened for the second jab, getting mine at 14 weeks after the first, way past any recommended interval.

And the same for the booster, which I later very much regretted that I'd chased for.

But suddenly and miraculously the NHS have remembered I exist for a second booster, too much so. I've just received a THIRD posted envelope urging me to get that. All three letters over three weeks were identical and all bore my NHS number. Surely that alone in a suitable computer system should prevent duplication and triplication?
.
The only plausible explanation is that the NHS recognises you are extremely young at heart for your age....
 
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flecc

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Oct 25, 2006
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The only plausible explanation is that the NHS recognises you are extremely young at heart for your age....
I think it simply reflects the NHS inadequacy I've suffered over the last 66 years of my life. I'm one person who could never clap for it.
.
 
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oyster

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2017
10,144
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Looks like UK EU exports are really unhappy...

Brexit led to 14% fall in UK exports to EU in 2021, trade figures say
Goods and services exported to bloc affected by return of customs border, EU commissioner says
 
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Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
17,207
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Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
I am well aware of the situation since day one of 2021. I may sell a bluetooth adapter for £25 to an eu customer who may get charged 15 euros in admin. Which export business can prosper if suffering that sort of extra cost?
Customs union would help but really we need to rejoin the single market.
 
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flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
50,886
28,710
Customs union would help but really we need to rejoin the single market.
Which would solve a whole raft of problems at a stroke, not least the ridiculous Northern Ireland situation.

And that would finally seal Boris Johnson's fate as the ultimate demonstration of how poor his judgement and competence has always been.
.
 

oyster

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Nov 7, 2017
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oyster

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2017
10,144
14,230
West West Wales
The question of the night seems to be, is it better to have drunkenly groped two men? Or to have done so when not drunk? That is, does being drunk compound the issue, or provide something approaching an excuse?
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
50,886
28,710
The question of the night seems to be, is it better to have drunkenly groped two men? Or to have done so when not drunk? That is, does being drunk compound the issue, or provide something approaching an excuse?
It is a valid excuse for extending a person's behaviour beyond its normal limit. The limit of acceptability though is determined by current societal norms, regardless of any mitigating factors like drunkeness or drug abuse.
.
 
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Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
17,207
15,033
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
Which would solve a whole raft of problems at a stroke, not least the ridiculous Northern Ireland situation.
we should blame the human tendency to believe that problems will somehow resolve themselves. They do but there is a time factor that people often underestimate. In the case of brexit, I fear that you and I may have died before the UK rejoins the single market. Tony Blair was on Radio 4 yesterday. He explained the position that Labour is in very well. Many voters feared PM JC and lent their votes to BJ. Kier Starmer has now to convince voters that his team is the government in waiting.
 

Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
8,475
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71
Ireland
I am well aware of the situation since day one of 2021. I may sell a bluetooth adapter for £25 to an eu customer who may get charged 15 euros in admin. Which export business can prosper if suffering that sort of extra cost?
Customs union would help but really we need to rejoin the single market.
Speaking from Ireland here ,Well for the last few purchases I have made on line, I have moved from Amazon UK to Amazon Germany. The costs are often significantly lower and the delivery very rapid. Amazon UK has a very streamlined service, but can no longer compare price wise ,as they include the surcharge into their calculation . The only British company where Brexit seems to have made no difference is Nespresso,and my coffee capsules arrive bang on schedule at the listed price . I have had a number of unfortunate purchases, when items which were being purchased from what appeared to be Irish websites ,were actually British and all sorts of surcharges applied... Domestic electric appliance spare parts
So I fully agree with you Woosh, trade from the UK to EU at the dealer to consumer level must be hammered. It would make sense running a remote depot,in your case from France.
 
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