Cable ties for rear wheel chain stay.......or other places!

GBCyclist

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 4, 2021
7
8
Having just fitted a rear hub kit it was obvious that a ‘normal’ cable tie would not allow the removal of the rear wheel if one is placed either side of the cable connector on the chain stay.

The solution is simple fit releasable cable ties.
Narrow nylon ties are available but usually in large amounts and could pinch the cable.
However Toolstation sell wide banded hook and loop (Velcro type) ties at 150mm (£1.51 for 10) or 300mm (£1.90 for 10).
Both are available in white or black and can be cut shorter.
I opted for the 150mm and cut about 15mm off, one fitted either side of the julet connector and all is secure out of the way of the chain and can easily be removed to allow the back wheel to be taken off the bike.......punctures are bound to happen.
 
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vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
8,385
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Basildon
Having just fitted a rear hub kit it was obvious that a ‘normal’ cable tie would not allow the removal of the rear wheel if one is placed either side of the cable connector on the chain stay.

The solution is simple fit releasable cable ties.
Narrow nylon ties are available but usually in large amounts and could pinch the cable.
However Toolstation sell wide banded hook and loop (Velcro type) ties at 150mm (£1.51 for 10) or 300mm (£1.90 for 10).
Both are available in white or black and can be cut shorter.
I opted for the 150mm and cut about 15mm off, one fitted either side of the julet connector and all is secure out of the way of the chain and can easily be removed to allow the back wheel to be taken off the bike.......punctures are bound to happen.
You don't take the wheel off to fix a puncture - just the tyre!
 
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GBCyclist

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 4, 2021
7
8
You don't take the wheel off to fix a pucture - just the tyre!
That’s one way but a better job is to take the wheel off, remove the tyre and tube, check the whole tyre for protruding objects etc, repair tube, pump up tube a little and again check before re-assembly. Much easier with the wheel off.
 
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vfr400

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Jun 12, 2011
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That’s one way but a better job is to take the wheel off, remove the tyre and tube, check the whole tyre for protruding objects etc, repair tube, pump up tube a little and again check before re-assembly. Much easier with the wheel off.
You want to do all that in the middle of a bike ride? I suppose it is possible to get a puncture in your garage, but I can't say that it ever happened to me.
 

GBCyclist

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 4, 2021
7
8
You want to do all that in the middle of a bike ride? I suppose it is possible to get a puncture in your garage, but I can't say that it ever happened to me.
It’s a very common practice for club cyclists to carry spare inner tubes on rides in order to facilitate a quick puncture repair, saves messing about with patches etc in unpredictable environments. Popping out the wheel is the only way to do this . All that is needed is one spanner, pump and tyre levers....not a garage. But hey each to thier own.
 
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vfr400

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Jun 12, 2011
8,385
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Basildon
You have the wrong frame of reference. We're talking about the motor wheel of an electric bike, not a typical road bike with QR wheels. If you want to carry a complete toolkit with you and spend an hour in the middle of your ride to fix a puncture, good luck to you, but don't try and persuade the rest of us that it's a sensible or necessary thing to do.
 

sjpt

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Jun 8, 2018
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That’s one way but a better job is to take the wheel off, remove the tyre and tube, check the whole tyre for protruding objects etc, repair tube, pump up tube a little and again check before re-assembly. Much easier with the wheel off.
Important to check the tyre as GBCyclist says (and I'm sure vfr400 meant but forgot to mention). You can still do that without taking off the wheel.

A good option to avoid wheel removal is Gaadi inner tubes; but if you already have regular inner tubes you will need to sacrifice them to fit the Gaadi without removing the wheel.

Wheel removal is well worth avoiding when possible if you have a rear wheel with Shimano hub gears and Magura rim brakes.
 
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Nealh

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Aug 7, 2014
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Going back to the opening sentence, one only needs to secure the Julet motor cable connector in position. All I use on my various bikes is one velcro wrap to hold the female connector in place, the male is held tightly enough to not need and securing so one doesn't need to worry at all with two ties. I have yet never had an issue with any coming loose or a bad connection, the Julet's fitted correctly will connect fit faint click and are tight enough that they don't wiggle or vibrate loose at all.
The problem by some is being over thought about unnecessarily.
 
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