Case studies - how has your electric bike changed your life?

selrahc1992

Esteemed Pedelecer
Dec 10, 2014
559
19
#41
Spot on. In the last week I have seen a huge dog fox (let me get within 10m or so), a family of bullfinches scrapping in a hedge, sunshine on fields from a high vantage point, hills rising from a sea of low mist like tropical islands. I have said good morning to total strangers, nodded at fellow cyclists, and been surprised how courteous the vast majority of car and van drivers are.

I love my cars and (motor)bikes, but you don't get any of this with an engine.
many thanks. I have be commuting for a few weeksnow since the car broke and realised two things today. on is that in a totally unexpected way (pedelecing doesnt feel strenuous) i lost half a stone (which is a relief), and i feel so much healthier.So much for all those who say its "cheating" - tome (i do a lot of running on a treadmill) it feels a lot more like being able to stay within "the zone", not being forced to overexert. the second really great thing is today: it was a firly crap commute to work at top speed (around 25 mph dodging potholes, not dodging some and very nearly causing a pinch puncture), BUT - havig survived it there is the procpect of a relaxed cruise home on a wave ofsome electric torque on a bicycle, something to me far better than a drive in a convertible
 

Johnderh

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 16, 2013
14
3
#42
Hi Guys . Its been a while since i was last in here :) .. Bought my kalkhoff BS10 (45km) from 50 cycles just under 2 years ago . I was recovering from a cancer op & needed something to Get me on my feet again .
Well here i am up & running & a lot of km done here in Norway , the bosch motor gave up the other day & one call to 50cycles was all that was needed . Send over the motor & we will send You a new one ..
This is the reason i bought from them in the first place as i read about There customer service on blogs Etc & in here.
So just to say .. My kalkhoff has really hjelped me back on my feet
I can honestly recommend this company & after sales
Cant wait to Get the motor back in ..
 

PatH

Pedelecer
Sep 4, 2015
49
9
51
#43
In my case I was done for drink driving recently, I'm an alcoholic and I didn't drive for 7 years because I knew what
would happen. I relied upon public transport and ordinary (but nice) pedal bikes, I've been a hardcore cyclist most of my life, all weathers, had a short job working somewhere with a really steep hill for the final mile, that was a killer of a hill, after two or three weeks I built up the stamina to do it without stopping but I'd arrive at work pumped up, hot and sweaty. Then have to deal with an office environment.

Sure got me fit though, lifelong drinker and smoker, I stopped both for a couple of months and got lazy in my recovery and bought a nice car, relapsed, busted, lost licence, wits end...

Somehow in the back of my mind must have been something about e-bikes. Didn't take long to make some calls and then my bike arrived, after a little wait.

I'm still fit enough to ride a decent push only bike but my e-bike is great for knowing I can chill if I want to and let the motor help with the hills.

It's basically a luxury item, a decent flat bar road bike did and would do me, eat the leg burn!

My purist friends scorn it, and I miss my sadly stolen Giant Rapid, it was such fun for mad exercise, ideally I would have a stable of different bikes.

But when it comes down to it, 90% of my bike usage is commuting, shopping, and 10% having fun, and my Sparta RXS is surprisingly good at handling the things I ask it to do, it looks a bit staid and boring in the Dutch style but it is rock solid, ok I can't pull stoppies or do skids, but it's rewarding in other ways.

I am midlife-crisis man, it was either this or do my motorcycle test, the latter is out of the window now!

Roll on.
 

acm2000

Pedelecer
Sep 20, 2015
118
10
Ipswich
#44
Bloody love my new ebike even though it seems im relatively young to own one at 35 lol

Had it a few weeks now and have racked up 86 miles so far commuting every day to and from work, as a non driver it has given me back the freedom i had as a child who was always on his bike when as an adult im just not fit anymore and now it also means i can take a short cycle out to the nearby village where my sisters ashes are buried to see her.

I went crank drive for the hill climbing and its been amazing being able to climb the worst of hills this town has to throw at me while giving my legs a good work out but not breaking out in to a lactic acid pain fest, and with long term usage im hoping this will really help build my fitness levels and leg strength.
 
Jul 18, 2014
137
17
65
#45
Bloody love my new ebike even though it seems im relatively young to own one at 35 lol

Had it a few weeks now and have racked up 86 miles so far commuting every day to and from work, as a non driver it has given me back the freedom i had as a child who was always on his bike when as an adult im just not fit anymore and now it also means i can take a short cycle out to the nearby village where my sisters ashes are buried to see her.

I went crank drive for the hill climbing and its been amazing being able to climb the worst of hills this town has to throw at me while giving my legs a good work out but not breaking out in to a lactic acid pain fest, and with long term usage im hoping this will really help build my fitness levels and leg strength.
Oh, you will, you will! I have been commuting by ebike for six months now, and the improvement in my fitness has been amazing. Hills that were an epic struggle to start with I can now climb fairly easily, a 13-mile hilly journey now seems trivial rather than heroic. I've got tons more puff, and my legs are far stronger. People often think that an ebike involves no effort, but I get a damn good workout on mine. What it means for me is that I can get to work in a reasonable time (roughly equivalent to a properly fit rider) but without being totally knackered at the end. I'm hot and breathing deeply, but still ok for a long shift. I'm going to stay with the ebike over the winter, and I am aiming to transition to a pushbike next spring. By then I hope to be able to do the journey in a roughly similar time. Enjoy the journey.
 
Aug 24, 2015
144
28
Wye Valley
#46
I don't have any tales of heroics, just my love of my little pedelec bike.

After always cycling as a teenager and student, including the London-Brighton marathon while at Uni in Brighton, I simply got out of the habit once I learned to drive and had my own car. Then, on moving to the hilly Wye Valley and not being fit enough to tackle the hills, my student bike moved into the shed beneath the cobwebs. I occasionally dusted it down and took it out but there was no fun in staggering up the hills, drenched in sweat and going dizzy with a pounding heart. Then I had the brainwave of an electric bike to tackle the hills, pondered for a year and have never looked back.

I use my folding electric bike purely for leisure. I squeeze it into my tiny campervan and take it with me despite it completely blocking the miniscule amount of available floorspace I have and have yet to manage lifting it onto the folded-down passenger seat as an alternative means of carrying it.
Locally I am using it for day trips - leisurely picnics at local castles, enjoying our local countryside and no longer having to worry about the hills or whether I'll be able to get home if I go too far and flop.

My little bike is a very small, cheap and simple one compared to many others here on this forum but I absolutely love it and the freedom it brings. My only regret is not buying it much sooner.
 
Oct 29, 2015
1
0
31
#47
Thanks for sharing your story. I am also looking for a good electric bike.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
6,111
125
55
West Sx RH
#48
Size, cost & style of bike are of no importance if it gets you out and about and puts a big :) or :D on your face.
 

Lancslass

Esteemed Pedelecer
#49
In my case I was done for drink driving recently, I'm an alcoholic and I didn't drive for 7 years because I knew what
would happen. I relied upon public transport and ordinary (but nice) pedal bikes, I've been a hardcore cyclist most of my life, all weathers, had a short job working somewhere with a really steep hill for the final mile, that was a killer of a hill, after two or three weeks I built up the stamina to do it without stopping but I'd arrive at work pumped up, hot and sweaty. Then have to deal with an office environment.

Sure got me fit though, lifelong drinker and smoker, I stopped both for a couple of months and got lazy in my recovery and bought a nice car, relapsed, busted, lost licence, wits end...

Somehow in the back of my mind must have been something about e-bikes. Didn't take long to make some calls and then my bike arrived, after a little wait.

I'm still fit enough to ride a decent push only bike but my e-bike is great for knowing I can chill if I want to and let the motor help with the hills.

It's basically a luxury item, a decent flat bar road bike did and would do me, eat the leg burn!

My purist friends scorn it, and I miss my sadly stolen Giant Rapid, it was such fun for mad exercise, ideally I would have a stable of different bikes.

But when it comes down to it, 90% of my bike usage is commuting, shopping, and 10% having fun, and my Sparta RXS is surprisingly good at handling the things I ask it to do, it looks a bit staid and boring in the Dutch style but it is rock solid, ok I can't pull stoppies or do skids, but it's rewarding in other ways.

I am midlife-crisis man, it was either this or do my motorcycle test, the latter is out of the window now!

Roll on.
I am fairly new here and have only just read your post.
Your story moved me.
I know that admitting you are an alcoholic is part of the what you do to recover but it still seems damned brave of anyone to come out with the statement and you have my full respect for that.
Don't go and knock your dutch style bike, learn to love it! I have one and I think they look gorgeous - so there!!:p
Good luck with your continuing recovery.
 

Lee

Pedelecer
Jan 3, 2016
46
5
#50
For me, it's served several purposes.

One was getting me to work faster, and not having to think about trains or buses to get where I want.

Helped me out of a depression. I hate hustle and bustle. I hate buses and crowded places. It enabled me to get to work along Brighton's undercliff pass which is one of the most healing experiences you can have, on an almost daily basis.

And it saves me a fortune on travel! I can ride where cars and motorcycles can't, away from it all, and I don't have to be bound by public transport. I can stay at a friend's 15 miles away, and if it gets to 1 am and I decide I don't want to sleep on the sofa, I can float through the night all the way home :)
 
Mar 25, 2016
31
5
52
#51
Lots of great stories of inspiration here,
I'm awaiting delivery of my first ever e-bike this week after following there development for the past 10 years. Although technology has changed a bit since then, unfortunately attitude here in the UK hasn't and we're still years behind the likes of Germany, The Netherlands, China etc. It needs to shake off the unfit, middle aged men, old people with ailments tag if it's ever going to really take off here. I guess it's a victim of the GB success in the sport that cycling is still mainly seen as such or keeping fit and healthy and not just getting from A to B or simply for leisure like me.


I'll post back here with my 'life changing' story :)
 
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Pete B

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 30, 2016
5
2
57
Droitwich
#52
Last July I collapsed with a brain aneurism. The result of this was that I had to give up my driving licence. I was stuck at home with the town centre a good 25 minutes walk. I decided to build myself an electric bike and the journey now takes me 4 minutes. It has totally transformed my life. I have my independence back. I have now built my girlfriend one and we regularly go out on 30 mile runs. I am chuffed to bits with the bikes. Wish I had done it years ago.
 
Dec 26, 2015
43
9
42
Pennine West Yorkshire
#53
Having an e-bike has got me out of my 4x4 and onto the bike for my commute to work and for local tasks (exercise class etc). Its turned the fifteen minute commute to/from work from a 'chore' to a pleasure!
 
Mar 9, 2016
833
20
#54
I broke 2 vertebrae in neck a few years ago, lost use of left arm for a while but back to around 60% now.
Sutuation made worse by recent knee replacement, had to pack in Windsurfing( its how I did neck) Thiught I,d never enjoy a sport as much ever again..Wrong...since having electric mtb ( Haibike) I,m averaging 85 miles a week off road.
Climbing higher, faster and going further than pre accident mountain biking..
Can actually clean sections I couldn't 20 years ago...looking forward to next ride before finishing present. Fantastic and only beneficial to knee and beck..Love it..Every cloud and that...
 

Chinapig

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 27, 2016
20
5
68
#55
Bought my first ebike approx ten years ago, as a commuting machine. It did that job well, and improved my fitness level to the extent that I switched to a conventional hybrid/road bike. That's been great to have as well, and fitness levels have gradually improved several notches further - my weight has reduced by a fair margin, with a mix of ebike and non-powered cycling helping me to lose well over 30 lbs. I'm now retired, and have just bought a new ebike to help extend my range, fight those headwinds, and try some off-road ebiking. I had my first experience of non-tarmac cycling today, testing out the new bike (an eMTB). Wow. An intoxicating sense of freedom, blasting along a slightly muddy bridleway at dusk. Didn't realise it could be such fun! Or offer so much potential.

It'll take me while to pluck up the courage to try the really hilly bumpy stuff, but the sudden realisation, that the tracks, trails and paths that I'd always thought were for "serious" cyclists only are now in reach, is a touch mind-blowing. Or at least it is for my ageing brain! I thought I was probably slightly bonkers for not buying a more tarmac-orientated ebike, but those reservations have evaporated very quickly... I'm thrilled to have added a new dimension to life and cycling. My apologies if that sounds a bit over the top, but I'm one very happy ebiker!
 
#56
Bought my first ebike approx ten years ago, as a commuting machine. It did that job well, and improved my fitness level to the extent that I switched to a conventional hybrid/road bike. That's been great to have as well, and fitness levels have gradually improved several notches further - my weight has reduced by a fair margin, with a mix of ebike and non-powered cycling helping me to lose well over 30 lbs. I'm now retired, and have just bought a new ebike to help extend my range, fight those headwinds, and try some off-road ebiking. I had my first experience of non-tarmac cycling today, testing out the new bike (an eMTB). Wow. An intoxicating sense of freedom, blasting along a slightly muddy bridleway at dusk. Didn't realise it could be such fun! Or offer so much potential.

It'll take me while to pluck up the courage to try the really hilly bumpy stuff, but the sudden realisation, that the tracks, trails and paths that I'd always thought were for "serious" cyclists only are now in reach, is a touch mind-blowing. Or at least it is for my ageing brain! I thought I was probably slightly bonkers for not buying a more tarmac-orientated ebike, but those reservations have evaporated very quickly... I'm thrilled to have added a new dimension to life and cycling. My apologies if that sounds a bit over the top, but I'm one very happy ebiker!
I might offer a few words of caution... I like you enjoy this later life freedom and the way an e-bike make you forget your age, but, last week I went on , what I can only term as, a Hard Ride. Went with my son on his unpowered bike but the sheer physicality of manhandling the heavy e-bike over 20 miles of rough terrain was great fun but left me with aching shoulders and wrists especially from the downhill bits. When he said we were only half way I sort of gulped, but the light was fading and we made our way home.
2 days recovery and I am fit for more, but not sure I can manage the 40 miles..
There is more to going off road than climbing hills...
 

Chinapig

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 27, 2016
20
5
68
#57
There is more to going off road than climbing hills...
Thanks Phill - point taken!

Yup, I'll certainly progress gently with venturing up - and down - the hillier off-road stuff, rather than jumping in at the deep end. Forest trails, tracks and bridleways will keep me busy for a fair while yet : )
 
Mar 9, 2016
833
20
#58
Thanks Phill - point taken!

Yup, I'll certainly progress gently with venturing up - and down - the hillier off-road stuff, rather than jumping in at the deep end. Forest trails, tracks and bridleways will keep me busy for a fair while yet : )
Go at your own pace and enjoy it. Going out with younger,fitter folk who might want to prove point can be a problem.
If you go out with them again make sure you know route and its length before hand..set your bike to maintain help throughout , and put plenty of air in tyres.( helps range, even off road). Make them go at your pace, and use highest setting only when really needed. ( big climbs) Swithch it off on down hills. ( it uses a bit now and again)
Carrying a flat battery is just an incumberance, you should get 40 miles out of it with a bit of planning.
Good luck.
 

Chinapig

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 27, 2016
20
5
68
#59
Go at your own pace and enjoy it. Going out with younger,fitter folk who might want to prove point can be a problem.
If you go out with them again make sure you know route and its length before hand..set your bike to maintain help throughout , and put plenty of air in tyres.( helps range, even off road). Make them go at your pace, and use highest setting only when really needed. ( big climbs) Swithch it off on down hills. ( it uses a bit now and again)
Carrying a flat battery is just an incumberance, you should get 40 miles out of it with a bit of planning.
Good luck.
Thanks Flud - sound advice.

I've recently discovered a similarly-aged and like-minded group of riders, via the U3A network. U3A = University of the Third Age, which is aimed at retired and semi-retired people over the age of 55. A branch near me organises a whole host of special interest groups, including a couple of cycling groups. Been on a couple of rides so far - a nice friendly bunch of people. A good way to meet make new friends, while trying to extend my range and stretch my capabilities. I plan to join them whenever possible, sometimes with the ebike, and sometimes with my hybrid/road bike.
 

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