Electric bike under£1000

Tugwell Gibson

Esteemed Pedelecer
Dec 30, 2016
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Thanks so much for all the replies what I would really like to know is if any bikes in my price range will have enough power left after 12hrs at the station to get me home and up the 1 in 4 hill many tks which models
Hi letchste. That's twice youve mentioned having enough power left in the battery after it's been standing 12 hours. Are you thinking it runs down while standing about?
 

Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
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Folding bikes are OK to take on a train once, but you wouldn't want to do it twice a day. They're Just to heavy and cumbersome.
.. yes that's true, but one of the advantages it's that the wheels are smaller and therefore easier to manouver than a full sized bike . Eg. My UrbanMover um20 used to reside under my stairs. There is no way my current Motus is as house trained so it lives in a shed. Walking it through the house or the passageway is a chore.
While the um20 was officially a folder, I think I have only folded it on 4 occasions in nearly 10years, but the option is always there.
 

Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
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Thanks so much for all the replies what I would really like to know is if any bikes in my price range will have enough power left after 12hrs at the station to get me home and up the 1 in 4 hill many tks which models
.. If the bike is switched off or the battery removed, any charge on it will remain for at least a month. If the battery were left on the bike, and it left switched on .. which would be a recipe for theft, there will be a small leakage of current to energise the electronics and it would lose charge per 3 to 4 days.
If you were ,in. A , position to ,do so,. Taking the battery With you would be a good. Anti theft measure.
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
.. yes that's true, but one of the advantages it's that the wheels are smaller and therefore easier to manouver than a full sized bike . Eg. My UrbanMover um20 used to reside under my stairs. There is no way my current Motus is as house trained so it lives in a shed. Walking it through the house or the passageway is a chore.
While the um20 was officially a folder, I think I have only folded it on 4 occasions in nearly 10years, but the option is always there.
That's right. Fold down the handlebar, fold the pedals and you can stand it in the hall-way. Folding them completely is horrible.
 

letchste

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 23, 2017
16
2
Yes all ebikes are capable of a 7 mile round trip. A 3 mile trip to the station will leave plenty of juice left in the tank. Power delivery will be relatively uniform until the battery is almost empty. You should get 20 to 25 miles from a 10ah battery, 13ah 25 to 35 miles and 15ah 40+ miles. This is a VERY rough guide as there are many variables but a 7 mile round trip will be a peice of cake for any modern ebike.

As for brands / models perhaps pick a few out that you like the look of and we can give feedback. It really depends what style of bike you want. Freego, Oxygen, Volt, Ezee, Juicy and Woosh are all well established brands but there are many others.
That's very helpful good to know
 

letchste

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 23, 2017
16
2
.. If the bike is switched off or the battery removed, any charge on it will remain for at least a month. If the battery were left on the bike, and it left switched on .. which would be a recipe for theft, there will be a small leakage of current to energise the electronics and it would lose charge per 3 to 4 days.
If you were ,in. A , position to ,do so,. Taking the battery With you would be a good. Anti theft measure.
That's good advice will keep it in mind
 

2Lazy

Pedelecer
Jul 17, 2013
211
145
Milton Keynes
If you're new to ebikes it's also worth mentioning that there are two types of drive system available. A hub motor bike as the name suggests has a motor built into the hub of the wheel, usually the back wheel but sometimes it can be the front wheel. A crank drive or centre drive bike has the motor built into the crank where th pedals are situated.

The riding experience on each system is very different. A hub motor bike will feel more like a low powered scooter/motorbike, almost all will have a pedal assist system that kicks in when you pedal and many will also have a throttle control. A crank drive bike by contrast feels more like riding a regular bike and generally requires a bit more effort as power delivery is based in part on torque, that is to say how hard you push down on the pedals, and most crank drive bikes don't have a throttle.

Most bikes under £1000 will have a hub motor system as crank drive bikes tend to come in at a higher price point, but it's just something to be aware of.
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,906
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Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
Most bikes under £1000 will have a hub motor system as crank drive bikes tend to come in at a higher price point, but it's just something to be aware of.
The Woosh Krieger is a crank drive bike, it costs £999 including delivery.
It is now fitted with a gear sensor.

http://wooshbikes.co.uk/?krieger

 
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Deleted member 4366

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If you're new to ebikes it's also worth mentioning that there are two types of drive system available. A hub motor bike as the name suggests has a motor built into the hub of the wheel, usually the back wheel but sometimes it can be the front wheel. A crank drive or centre drive bike has the motor built into the crank where th pedals are situated.

The riding experience on each system is very different. A hub motor bike will feel more like a low powered scooter/motorbike, almost all will have a pedal assist system that kicks in when you pedal and many will also have a throttle control. A crank drive bike by contrast feels more like riding a regular bike and generally requires a bit more effort as power delivery is based in part on torque, that is to say how hard you push down on the pedals, and most crank drive bikes don't have a throttle.

Most bikes under £1000 will have a hub motor system as crank drive bikes tend to come in at a higher price point, but it's just something to be aware of.
You can't generalise like that. From those comments, I guess you haven't ridden many different hub-motored bikes. It's more the control system that gives the feel of the bike rather than the motor. The main difference between the two types of motor is the way you have to use the gears more on a CD motor.

If you were comparing a Cyclamatic mk1 with a Bosch bike, your comments would be valid, but if you compared a KTM Panasonic with a Woosh Sport CD mk1, you'd be saying the exact opposite.

Did you try a Wisper Torque, A KTM Panasonic or any bike with a Bionx?

If you had kept your comments to price rather than type of motor, they wouldn't be so far off. The cheapest bikes tend to have the worst control system, but you can't make a fixed rule even with that.
 

2Lazy

Pedelecer
Jul 17, 2013
211
145
Milton Keynes
You can't generalise like that. From those comments, I guess you haven't ridden many different hub-motored bikes. It's more the control system that gives the feel of the bike rather than the motor. The main difference between the two types of motor is the way you have to use the gears more on a CD motor.

If you were comparing a Cyclamatic mk1 with a Bosch bike, your comments would be valid, but if you compared a KTM Panasonic with a Woosh Sport CD mk1, you'd be saying the exact opposite.

Did you try a Wisper Torque, A KTM Panasonic or any bike with a Bionx?

If you had kept your comments to price rather than type of motor, they wouldn't be so far off. The cheapest bikes tend to have the worst control system, but you can't make a fixed rule even with that.
What I have said is a generalisation and it was intentional. There are of course hub motor bikes with torque sensors (I've ridden a couple) and likewise centre drives with throttles etc. But the OP is new to ebikes and has a £1000 budget and as such I did not want to overcomplicate things. This is just some basic page one advice which might be helpful for them to know. If the OP follows the usual advice of this forum and test rides a few bikes they should in any case get a feel for the different bikes / systems.

But for the avoidance of any doubt I agree that this subject is more nuanced especially for bikes at the premium end of the price spectrum, and that it's the control system that in large part determines the feel of the bike.
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,906
14,781
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
The main difference between the two types of motor is the way you have to use the gears more on a CD motor.
The main difference between the two types of motor is the way the bike wiggles its derriere.
I sometimes do a 'wiggling' test for the feel of the bike, holding to the left brake and the saddle. The less the bike wiggles its derriere, the more it feels bikey.
 

Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
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The main difference between the two types of motor is the way the bike wiggles its derriere.
I sometimes do a 'wiggling' test for the feel of the bike, holding to the left brake and the saddle. The less the bike wiggles its derriere, the more it feels bikey.
... Are we still talking about bikes? Or is there a connection I'm missing?
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,906
14,781
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
cupid and psyche? Rider and his bike?
 

letchste

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 23, 2017
16
2
What I have said is a generalisation and it was intentional. There are of course hub motor bikes with torque sensors (I've ridden a couple) and likewise centre drives with throttles etc. But the OP is new to ebikes and has a £1000 budget and as such I did not want to overcomplicate things. This is just some basic page one advice which might be helpful for them to know. If the OP follows the usual advice of this forum and test rides a few bikes they should in any case get a feel for the different bikes / systems.

But for the avoidance of any doubt I agree that this subject is more nuanced especially for bikes at the premium end of the price spectrum, and that it's the control system that in large part determines the feel of the bike.
Many thanks for this so whose big bear and Krueger in my price range. Any others capable of getting a 15 stone man up a 1 in 4 hill. Many thanks for all your help I do appreciate it
 
D

Deleted member 4366

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Are you sure it's 1 in 4? That's pretty steep. Is there a sign that says 1 in 4 because you can't rely on Strava or Google?

If you have a smart-phone, you can download Clinometer app, which can measure fairly accurately.

If it's truly 1 in 4, you need a bike with very low gearing and probably a crank-drive.
 

Chainring

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 24, 2013
318
152
That's what I was thinking - not many 1 in 4's around. Porlock Hill in Devon is one. Ten more steep un's listed here:
https://roadcyclinguk.com/sportive/ten-uks-steepest-climbs.html

Gaz
There is a 1 in 4 at Milland, near Liphook, and I think Harting Hill is as well, although the Tour de France bods went up it quite fast! I walked down it with my bike with a trailer on the back, very cautiously! Yes, 1 in 4 is steep.