New Woosh Rambletta Walk Around

Grebacwhite

Pedelecer
Aug 9, 2020
63
49
West sussex
Yes I've taken to riding in a lower mode and balancing the motor assist with the variable throttle to keep speed with my partner when we both ride out electric bikes as they are slightly different in their power assist.

I did actually delete the post I wrote as I thought better to put it in my review when I write one on the Rambletta as it'll be more appropriate than posting them stats and figures on someone else's post and then double posting in my own later on.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
16,595
6,470
58
West Sx RH
No need to keep deleting posts as it is relevant to the thread and the bike. When posters like me post a reply it often makes the reply senseless in comparison to the thread. It is better to leave the previous post it was in reply to to keep the thread continuity going, one can always cut and paste the same info to a new thread another time which isn't a problem.
 
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Grebacwhite

Pedelecer
Aug 9, 2020
63
49
West sussex
Yep it does make sense, just didn't want to double post in different places but here's my original reply regarding the Rambletta.


I noted down some battery info on my Woosh Rambletta for anyone interested.

Assisted speed limit.
Mode 1 speed is up to 8mph
Mode 2 speed is up to 12mph
Mode 3 speed is up to 14mph
Mode 4 speed is up to 15.5mph
Mode 5 same as Mode 4.


Speed did drop by 1-2 mph as the battery gradually depletes down to 20% charge. Only noticed in Modes 2 and 3.


Mode 2 I achieved 15 miles per 20% battery use.
Mode 3 I achieved 9 miles per 20% battery use.
Mode 4 I achieved 6.5 miles per 20% battery use.


Battery took 5 hours to charge from 20% to 100%.


Real world range for me is around 28-38miles still with 20% battery left.
 

Bonzo Banana

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2019
275
129
Tbh I can't tell if it's doing anything at all, it's sprung so hard, has little travel, and with the upright riding position it's kinda pointless imo. Much better is the suspension seat post. In time I'll look to buying a decent one as it's proven it's a worthwhile addition to the bike.
I do love my Rambletta, even battery range is proving acceptable, I'm getting low to mid 30's before needing to charge it, with the battery indicator still showing 2 bars at this point.
Sounds like it might make hitting potholes less jarring but I just hate them as they are a strength weakness and need maintenance over the years I prefer a solid fork that is maintenance free and rely on the tyres for suspension. Also most of a riders weight is at the back it's split something like 70:30 to 60:40 towards the back so its much more sensible to have suspension at the rear like a Brompton or a suspension seatpost or spring loaded saddle. I'm not surprised Woosh have gone for it though its one of those things customers want even if they don't really need it.

It's like all those ultra cheap dual suspension mountain bikes, people buy them but they are utterly awful bikes needing constant maintenance and are extremely heavy. Simplicity goes a long way with bicycles.
 
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Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,906
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Sounds like it might make hitting potholes less jarring but I just hate them as they are a strength weakness and need maintenance over the years I prefer a solid fork that is maintenance free and rely on the tyres for suspension. Also most of a riders weight is at the back it's split something like 70:30 to 60:40 towards the back so its much more sensible to have suspension at the rear like a Brompton or a suspension seatpost or spring loaded saddle. I'm not surprised Woosh have gone for it though its one of those things customers want even if they don't really need it.
the Rambletta comes with a choice of fork.

Rambletta with rigid fork, £30 cheaper:



The suspension fork has 30mm travel.
As you said, the suspension fork makes hitting potholes less jarring.
Also, it makes riding on unmade tracks in parks and along river banks much more comfortable.
On bikes with 20" tyres, we tend to inflate the tyres about 5 PSI more than on bikes with 26" tyres. The suspension seat post is good but the suspension fork helps too.
 
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Bonzo Banana

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2019
275
129
the Rambletta comes with a choice of fork.

Rambletta with rigid fork, £30 cheaper:



The suspension fork has 30mm travel.
As you said, the suspension fork makes hitting potholes less jarring.
Also, it makes riding on unmade tracks in parks and along river banks much more comfortable.
On bikes with 20" tyres, we tend to inflate the tyres about 5 PSI more than on bikes with 26" tyres. The suspension seat post is good but the suspension fork helps too.
As a heavy rider I know all about tyre pressures, if I ride a 700x28 road bike tyre the pressure that gives me a nice suspension effect will mean I'm down on the rims if I hit a pot hole with a puncture fairly likely. On 26" tyres like 26"x2.10" I can find a tyre pressure that not only gives a great suspension effect but still prevents the tyre going down to the rim even on pot holes because of the much greater air volume. 20" wheels still have sufficient air volume for me there are tyres like the Kenda Admiral that are something like 20"x2.4" that have loads of air volume and go up to something like 100psi. Fantastic grip too with short braking distances but then they are designed for BMX bikes so are very abuse-able tyres.

My folding bike actually came with Kenda BMX tyres. I'm not keen on the lighter lower profile tyres many folding bikes come with.

 
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Woosh

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May 19, 2012
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20" wheels still have sufficient air volume for me there are tyres like the Kenda Admiral that are something like 20"x2.4" that have loads of air volume and go up to something like 100psi. Fantastic grip too with short braking distances but then they are designed for BMX bikes so are very abuse-able tyres.
The Rambletta is fitted with Kenda 20" x 2.0" tyres but can take balloon tyres if you want.
 

Bonzo Banana

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2019
275
129
I don't think they're Kenda? My new Rambletta came with Chinese brand Chen Shin CST tyres? Same tread pattern as your photo so must be same tyre?
CST are good tyres, they own Maxxis and make many brand tyres for other companies like WTB tyres. CST and Kenda are the big manufacturing companies behind many brands you see. I do prefer Kenda myself though. Schwalbe uses a Korean company for their tyres which I think are typically made in Indonesia where the main factory is. Same with inner tubes most are made by Kenda or CST even brands like Continental etc. Both are Taiwanese companies but they mainly manufacture I think in mainland China or places like Cambodia or Vietnam.

I think CST and Kenda are seen as the lowest cost good quality tyres so are often seen on budget entry level bikes.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
16,595
6,470
58
West Sx RH
I like my WTB tyres on 700c rims, TL or tubed they give good grip with the softer compounds. Nice for road use esp now.
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,906
14,781
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
I don't think they're Kenda? My new Rambletta came with Chinese brand Chen Shin CST tyres? Same tread pattern as your photo so must be same tyre?
you are right, my mistake.
The tyres are CST, not Kenda.
 
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PP100

Esteemed Pedelecer
Feb 28, 2020
252
149
It could be the mudguards rubbing?
As I mentioned, only rubs when pedalling , not when wheels are freewheeling or coasting - which to me suggests the crank or the chain/plastic cover?
Intermittent - looks like I'm going to have to get it back on to the bike rack again to have a second go to try to diagnose exactly where the rubbing is .
In another minor irritant, the bell keeps ringing when it goes over a slight bump with the vibration. So need to see if I can adjust or will have to replace.
 
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Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,906
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Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
As I mentioned, only rubs when pedalling , not when wheels are freewheeling or coasting - which to me suggests the crank or the chain/plastic cover?
The plastic chainguard is attached to the chainguard bracket at the front with two crosshead screws. It can happen that we may have not lined up the chainguard properly when we fitted it. If the chainguard is too close to the ring, it can make the rubbing noise you described. If that is the case, I apologise, please loosen the top and bottom screws and correct the position of the chainguard.
 
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PP100

Esteemed Pedelecer
Feb 28, 2020
252
149
The plastic chainguard is attached to the chainguard bracket at the front with two crosshead screws. It can happen that we may have not lined up the chainguard properly when we fitted it. If the chainguard is too close to the ring, it can make the rubbing noise you described. If that is the case, I apologise, please loosen the top and bottom screws and correct the position of the chainguard.
Thanks for the reply. I did adjust the top screw previously but not the lower one -
so now with both adjusted and tightened . I will see if that helps.
I also loosened the bell strap on the handlebar to hopefully reduce the vibration travel. Will monitor.