Newbie with questions

L6mbt

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 1, 2019
11
2
I'm a newcomer to ebikes and I chose, as a "starter" bike, the budget level Carrera Vengeance, which I've had now for two months. First impressions are good; I have found it's hill-climbing abilities amazing. It has three levels of power; I find I rarely need levels 2 or 3. Level one gives a huge surge of power up to around 10mph, seemingly regardless of which gear I'm in, how hard I pedal, or how steep the gradient. However, this means I do have difficulties with low speed manoevering e g on "shared" paths or on rough tracks and, in these situations, I find I have to turn off the power assistance completely. Is the the norm with ebikes?
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
1,795
406
Basildon
The power behaves like that because the controller uses speed control. Each of the three levels give different speed limits, but the power allowed is the same for each level.

What's better is a controller that uses power control, where each level gives a different amount of power, and they all allow the same maximum speed.

It's not easy to change controllers unless you have some skills and knowledge.
 
Last edited:

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
10,890
7,917
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
I'm a newcomer to ebikes and I chose, as a "starter" bike, the budget level Carrera Vengeance, which I've had now for two months. First impressions are good; I have found it's hill-climbing abilities amazing. It has three levels of power; I find I rarely need levels 2 or 3. Level one gives a huge surge of power up to around 10mph, seemingly regardless of which gear I'm in, how hard I pedal, or how steep the gradient. However, this means I do have difficulties with low speed manoevering e g on "shared" paths or on rough tracks and, in these situations, I find I have to turn off the power assistance completely. Is the the norm with ebikes?
that's not what happens with my bikes.
You have 5 assist levels, set as percentage of power, 50%, 65%, 80%, 90%, 100% that you can set to your own in the LCD.
Level 1 and 2 let you exercise quite a bit, the bike goes as fast as you pedal until the legal speed limit is met, then the motor cuts out.
The throttle is activated after you pedal for couple of seconds. If you push the throttle thumb lever, you control the power of the motor, you can go fast or real slow if you like, for example walking your dog, like a scooter.
 

Andy-Mat

Esteemed Pedelecer
Oct 26, 2018
387
83
72
I'm a newcomer to ebikes and I chose, as a "starter" bike, the budget level Carrera Vengeance, which I've had now for two months. First impressions are good; I have found it's hill-climbing abilities amazing. It has three levels of power; I find I rarely need levels 2 or 3. Level one gives a huge surge of power up to around 10mph, seemingly regardless of which gear I'm in, how hard I pedal, or how steep the gradient. However, this means I do have difficulties with low speed manoevering e g on "shared" paths or on rough tracks and, in these situations, I find I have to turn off the power assistance completely. Is the the norm with ebikes?
I have heard of such complaints before, but its not my experience at all, but I only have ridden a few different e-bikes.
Most ebikes have both brake levers that shut off motor power instantly, even if the brake is only slightly "on", this may help you in such situations.
You may need to add a tiny bit of slack to the brake cable, to enable motor off, but no braking...
I would do it only to the rear brake as the front brake is generally the one needed with full efficiency, and the rear just helps with steadying things up....but keep that "dead zone" as small as possible.
You still have guarantee?
Maybe the seller can "tone it down" a bit?
Possibly reprogram/reduce the maximum current from the controller maybe?
Maybe there are even other parameters that might help?
Or replace the controller with something better and more progressive?
I am sure that there are other possible thoughts too that other members may know of.
Regards
Andy
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
7,510
2,860
56
West Sx RH
KT controllers give a better % range through out the 5 PAS levels, approx. 13/20/33/50 & 100% of amps using current control also user can reduce the current by up to 50% in the advanced C settings on newer/latest controllers.

My controllers are a few years old and don't use the % range reduction but uses the older method of 0.5a - 5a current reduction in 10 stages.
 

L6mbt

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 1, 2019
11
2
Many thanks for the replies, guys. I have just found the thread "Speed(Cadence) sensors versus Torque sensors. This explains a lot. My ebike has a speed sensor (being at the lower end of the market) and I guess this is a characteristic of the type. I am sure, with familiarisation, I shall learn to live with it!
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
10,890
7,917
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
I am sure, with familiarisation, I shall learn to live with it!
and even love it.
count your blessing when you climb up a steep hill.
the cadence sensor lets you pedal as much as you like, at nearly any cadence to suit your heart rate.
A torque sensor is more demanding, you have to put in at least 25% of the energy (or whatever is programmed into the turbo mode), select in the right gear and spin the cranks at least 60+ RPM to get the best out of your motor.
Torque sensor is lovely on most terrains but can be a pain on steep hills, unless you have a throttle.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
1,795
406
Basildon
Many thanks for the replies, guys. I have just found the thread "Speed(Cadence) sensors versus Torque sensors. This explains a lot. My ebike has a speed sensor (being at the lower end of the market) and I guess this is a characteristic of the type. I am sure, with familiarisation, I shall learn to live with it!
The type of sensor has little to do with it. It's only because you have a speed control controller. Change your controller and the problem will go away.
 

L6mbt

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 1, 2019
11
2
Most ebikes have both brake levers that shut off motor power instantly, even if the brake is only slightly "on", this may help you in such situations.
Many thanks, Andy-Mat, for this oh-so-simple, but vital, piece of information. Yes, I've found this works (!) and makes all the difference to the bike's rideability.

(Unfortunately, you don't get a user manual with a Carrera bike and I got very little guidance from the retail staff. How is someone new to the bikes be expected to know?).
 

L6mbt

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 1, 2019
11
2
Following on from the above, I now see a second wire/cable coming from each brake lever (in addition to the one which operates the brake), and with what looks like a knurled adjuster next to the lever. Am I right in thinking that this can be used to adjust the point at which the motor is engaged when the lever is released?

Getting wet in today's showers, I thought I should enquire about what measures I should take to ensure the electrics aren't affected by the rain. Do you guys take any special precautions in these circumstances?
 

sjpt

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 8, 2018
349
128
Usually the knurled adjuster is on the brake cable itself and does not directly affect the motor on/off switch in the brake. General practice (electric or not) is to adjust it so the brake pads are as near the rim as possible without rubbing ... the truer the wheel the closer that can be. This makes the brake operate as quickly as possible.

If you want a touch of the brakes to turn off the motor before the brake start to engage you could loosen that off a little; not too much or the brake lever may get limited by hitting the handlebars, lessening the full brake power.

There is also sometimes a second adjustment (also non-electric) that changes how far out the lever can go, to help it adjust to small hands. Again, if you reduce this too much so the lever is too close to the bars in the open position you risk reducing the full brake power.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
1,795
406
Basildon
The knurled knob on the sensor sometimes adjusts the switch point, but it's not really designed for that. The switch comes out from the opposite side, so the knurled knob holds it in. There's no spring on it, so it'll just rattle about in there if you loosen it. If you had a way of holding the switch in position, it could get broken by the lever if too far in. Sometimes they're glued, so be careful.
 

L6mbt

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 1, 2019
11
2
I think I'll leave well alone! I've slackened off the brake cable a fraction and things are now working quite well. Many thanks for the help.
 

L6mbt

Finding my (electric) wheels
Feb 1, 2019
11
2
Not fancying finding myself far from home with a puncture, on my new(ish) Carrera Vengeance, I decide to add the slime to my tyres. (I found this a very straightforward job, easier than I feared)! I have seen references saying the benefits of slime can last for two years, but nothing telling me what to do after that! Can it be "topped up" or should one start again with a new tube?
 

Laser Man

Pedelecer
Jul 1, 2018
101
59
Michelmersh SO51
I think you're supposed to throw the tube and start again.

Aldi have pre-slimed tubes at £1.99 each at the moment. The box says they have a 2-year life.