Oxygen S-Cross Derestriction

Kris1432

Finding my (electric) wheels
May 3, 2020
5
1
They've changed the LCD display as well, and I have to say, I prefer the look of the old one!
The new one is way more suited to a Mountain Bike, take a look at most eMTB bikes, a big central LCD definitely fits more on a commuter.
 
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vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
5,535
2,043
Basildon
The bikes aren't designed to sustain derestriction speeds, I've seen a lot of problems coming from it.
Please enlighten us with your wisdom by giving examples of such problems. I say that statement is completely bogus, but I'm always ready to adapt my opinions in the face of hard evidence.

Speed has no detrimental affect whatsoever on a bike with a hub-motor. The fast it spins, the lower is the current, the torque and the loads on it. The same applies to the battery and the controller.
 

Kris1432

Finding my (electric) wheels
May 3, 2020
5
1
That's completely bogus. Please give examples of such problems.

Speed has no detrimental affect whatsoever on a bike with a hub-motor. The fast it spins, the lower is the current, the torque and the loads on it. The same applies to the battery and the controller.
Alright Dave, hows it going mate. I've seen more frequent spoke snapping, motor cutting out on very steep inclines, only whilst destricted, I've done extensive testing on this myself personally and have seen the difference. The motors performance whilst out on a ride is much greater whilst the restriction is in place, I notice a drop in torque when climbing during derestriction on the less steeper inclines.

Repeat offenders of warranty 9/10 come from those who have derestricted.
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
14,483
11,581
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
it is not so.
When you derestrict a hub bike, you will tend to ride faster and as everybody knows, high speed equals higher battery consumption per mile. If you ride on a flat road at 15mph, your motor uses about 200WH and wastes about 50WH in heat per hour. if you ride at 28mph, it'll use more than 800WH per hour and wastes about 200WH per hour.
Your controller will suffer continuously.
The wear and tear of the internal gearbox is also greatly accelerated.
Higher speed equals accelerated wear.
Your brake pads wear faster too. The only bit that wears less is your shoes.
 
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vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
5,535
2,043
Basildon
it is not so.
When you derestrict a hub bike, you will tend to ride faster and as everybody knows, high speed equals higher battery consumption per mile. If you ride on a flat road at 15mph, your motor uses about 200WH and wastes about 50WH in heat per hour. if you ride at 28mph, it'll use more than 800WH per hour and wastes about 200WH per hour.
Your controller will suffer continuously.
The wear and tear of the internal gearbox is also greatly accelerated.
Higher speed equals accelerated wear.
Your brake pads wear faster too. The only bit that wears less is your shoes.
You should feel ashamed in not understanding how hub-motors work. What you're saying would be correct for an unrestricted crank-motor system, but the back emf from a typical 260 rpm hub-motor, like on the Oxygen and some of your bikes prevents that.

With a 15mph cut-off, the motor will cut in and out. The average consumption might be 200w, but when the motor cuts back in, it'll try to accelerate the bike back yup to 15 mph and will take the maximum current allowed by the settings. Under speed control, that would be 15 amps cutting in and out., so you'd be using 600w for 1/3 of the time. Without restriction, the average current would be the same up to 15 mph, but it would be continuous, so the same 200w would be less than 6 amps. After 15 mph, you could use the maximum current to accelerate the bike, but you'd already be going down the ramp where the current gets increasingly reduced by the back emf, until you're only getting about 3 amps at 20 mph.

The Oxygen can't do 28 mph, so that's irrelevant. The previous version maxed out at about 22 mph. IIRC. Even if it could spin to 28mph, the back emf would have reduced the current to zero at that point, so the controller would be handling zero watts, not 800w.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
5,535
2,043
Basildon
Alright Dave, hows it going mate. I've seen more frequent spoke snapping, motor cutting out on very steep inclines, only whilst destricted, I've done extensive testing on this myself personally and have seen the difference. The motors performance whilst out on a ride is much greater whilst the restriction is in place, I notice a drop in torque when climbing during derestriction on the less steeper inclines.

Repeat offenders of warranty 9/10 come from those who have derestricted.
None of that makes any sense, and, frankly, I don't believe it's true. there is nothing in a hub-motor control system that can change the performance sub-15mph because the speed limit is released.

So, a mate had an unrestricted bike and his spokes broke. Ergo, derestricting a bike breaks spokes. Really! What sort of logic is that? I ride a grey bike and I don't get any punctures. Ergo grey bikes don't get punctures. Brilliant. Spread the word.
 
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Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
14,483
11,581
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
You should feel ashamed in not understanding how hub-motors work.
you can see why I prefer selling hub motors to the younger customers.
 
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