Rear hub questions wooshbikes

oldie1982

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 16, 2020
9
0
Hi guys

Sorry a bit long winded but need some advice.

Great forum, read and learnt lots.

I been riding bikes on and off for years. Pretty proficient in fixing just about anything on a bike.

I have a couple of questions.

I commute 10 miles each day. Not a great distance but two big hills on my commute. I end up a sweaty mess both ways. I take it easy but it dont help much as im not the fittest rider.

This led me to think about getting a motor. I was all set for a mid drive Bafang bbshd until i read that hub motors are better for commuting. Is this true?

Secondly i was all set for buying the motor from China and getting a battery built from Insat.

Now i came across this forum and have come across a lot of positive comments about wooshbikes.

For the warranty and piece of mind i dont think i would save too much if i went the China and Insat route. Better of going to wooshbikes i think anyway.

Are the woosh kits limited to 15mph?

I weigh about 100 kilos and have a large framed bike with enough clearance for a big battery.

I was thinking of getting the rack mounted battery but was concerned with the weight of the hub and battery over the rear wheel would this affect the bike negatively?

Or am i better of with tube mounted battery to distribute the weight more evenly?

Are the battery and motor waterproof enough for commuting?, Bike has full mud guards.

Lastly any recommendations on hub motor?

Many thanks for taking the time to read this.
 

Jonah

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 23, 2010
881
246
EX38
Hub motors have less to go wrong and don’t cause wear to the drivetrain and these are the main reasons for recommending them for commuting. Woosh are highly recommended. I would recommend a frame battery placement to keep weight lower down and more central. I rate the lightweight Aikema motor but given your bike and weight you might be better off with the beefier 48v offerings like the DWG22C.

All kits will be limited to 15.5mph but can be easily changed (not legally of course). Generally the motors are not designed to run efficiently much faster but most will be happy up to around 20mph if desired. In practise, if you are moving faster than 15mph you don’t really need assist.

Waterproof enough for riding but not for storing outside permanently.
 
Last edited:
  • Agree
Reactions: sjpt

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
9,822
3,938
Basildon
If you're already doing the commute, any kit will give you what you want.

A battery in your triangle would be better than a rack one, though it's not a massive difference. The Hailong batteries have their fixing points too high for normal bottle fixings, so you'll most likely need to drill your frame and put in a rivnut. Don't go for one of those if you're a bit ham-fisted. The Dolphin and bottle batteries fit straight on, but if you can't get one of those, the rack battery could be an option.

Electric bikes are alright in the rain, but they don't like to be left out in the rain. You need a cover or shelter wherever you park at work. Also, electric bikes are very nickable, so make sure you have a secure place to put it.
 

oldie1982

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 16, 2020
9
0
Many thanks for your replies.

The bike will be stored inside out of rain.

I wont mess up the extra rivnut installation.(hopefully not like a fork install yesterday where i didnt measure the stem and had to fit the fork with no spacers, was meant to have 50mm spacers lol)

I have an extra bike for weekend rides so i can pretty much do what i want to this bike but keep it reliable.

I just hate having to arrive at work hot amd uncomfortable hence i want the most powerful motor/battery combination. Rather have it than not.

I forgot to mention my commute is along a private road around a private estate.

How would i overcome the 15mph restriction?

20-25mph is more than enough.

More than anything i rather have the capability and not use it.

I commute on the bike for exercise. The speed and power are for those days when im too tired but have to cycle to and back from work. It doesn't happen often but when it does it feels like death.

I am currently considering the DWG22C and SX02 i believe? Good powerful hub motors.

Anything else anyone recommends?

The battery will be from Insat, i need that peace of mind. Dont mind getting any other hub motor if its more closer to my requirements above, even from China.

Cheers
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
9,822
3,938
Basildon
Many thanks for your replies.

The bike will be stored inside out of rain.

I wont mess up the extra rivnut installation.(hopefully not like a fork install yesterday where i didnt measure the stem and had to fit the fork with no spacers, was meant to have 50mm spacers lol)

I have an extra bike for weekend rides so i can pretty much do what i want to this bike but keep it reliable.

I just hate having to arrive at work hot amd uncomfortable hence i want the most powerful motor/battery combination. Rather have it than not.

I forgot to mention my commute is along a private road around a private estate.

How would i overcome the 15mph restriction?

20-25mph is more than enough.

More than anything i rather have the capability and not use it.

I commute on the bike for exercise. The speed and power are for those days when im too tired but have to cycle to and back from work. It doesn't happen often but when it does it feels like death.

I am currently considering the DWG22C and SX02 i believe? Good powerful hub motors.

Anything else anyone recommends?

The battery will be from Insat, i need that peace of mind. Dont mind getting any other hub motor if its more closer to my requirements above, even from China.

Cheers
If you're getting the battery from Insat, then get the dolphin (09 case) type for easy installation.

If you buy components, I recommend the 36v/48v sinewave controller from Elifebike or Topbikekit along with the LCD3 , throttle and 8 or 10 magnet PAS. It's always best to get an external speed sensor in case of problems with the motor's one. That controller is user-programmable, so you can make the speed whatever you want.

Any motor will give you what you want, but there are some advantages and disadvantages. If you have 7 speeds or less you can get a normal rear hub-motor, but if you have 8 or more, you need a cassette one. The most important thing is the motor's max rpm. You need at least 260 rpm for 20 mph. Motor RPM is proportional to battery voltage, and the voltage stamped on the voltage doesn't mean anything except that's the voltage at which you get the designated rpm. A 260 rpm 36v motor becomes a 338 rpm one at 48v.

Are you going to build the wheel yourself or get a motor already in one?
 
Last edited:

oldie1982

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 16, 2020
9
0
Hi

Thanks for the advice. I will look into your suggestions.

I did think about getting a wheel already built but it don't really matter apart from i know i can get a half decent rim laced to the motor.

Either way is ok with me.

I have a 8 speed cassette.
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,429
14,141
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
you will need to decide to buy in the UK or abroad. If you buy abroad, the support will likely to come from the forum. Even with the best help from members, I don't think it can compare with direct support from a UK company.
You will also have to decide if you want to buy from one source or multiple sources. Again, support from one source is usually much better than from 2 or 3 sources.
For those reasons, Woosh sell only the whole kits, not parts other than in exceptional circumstances.
I usually recommend the 48V hub kits to those who are on the high side of 100kgs. There are a couple of differences between the 48V SWX02 and 48V DWG22C. The SWX02 is easier to fit, even if you have cassettes. The motor case is 140mm in diameter so if you have disc brakes, it will take any rotors, the popular 160mm rotor or larger. The SWX02 has thread for screw on freewheels.
The DWG22C is larger, its case is 160mm in diameter. If you have disc brakes, the rotor needs to be 180mm or more to clear enough space for the caliper. The DWG22C has a freehub body and will take cassettes from 8-speed to 10-speed.
So if you have a cassette, should you choose automatically the DWG22C? I'd say check your brake rotor first. If you have 160mm rotor, you may save a bit of hassle going for the SWX02 and get a new Sunrace freewheel. We keep the popular 8-speed Sunrace freewheels in stock.
https://wooshbikes.co.uk/cart/#/product/uid-241-dwg22c-48v12ah/shengyi-dwg22c-48v-250w-rear-hub-kit-with-48v-12ah-battery
https://wooshbikes.co.uk/cart/#/product/uid-188-swx02-48v12ah/bafang-swx02-48v-250w-rear-hub-kit-with-48v-12ah-battery

freewheel for SWX02 should you need it:

https://wooshbikes.co.uk/cart/#/product/uid-sr-8/8-speed-freewheel-for-swx02-xf07-and-bpm-rear-hub-kits

I always recommend that you send in some pictures of your bike. I always check them for potential issues and make recommendations.
- the general bike
- the handlebars viewed from front
- the bottom bracket area, bike upside down.

the address is kits@wooshbikes.co.uk

We have 4 different pedal sensors and 4 different brake sensors to cope with different situations. The left side pedal sensor is the most popular choice because it's simple to install but you have to have the space for it between the inner face of the left crank and the bottom bracket cup. On some bikes, it's better to replace an old bottom bracket with a new one that can take the left side pedal sensor. Most of the time, the normal right side pedal sensor is the best choice.
 
Last edited:

oldie1982

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 16, 2020
9
0
Thanks for the infkrmation.

Its the support hence why you giys are at the top of my list at the moment.

I have a pm to pm adaptor and a 180mm disc hanging on the wall so thats not an issue.

In that case you recommend the DWG22C?

I will send you the details you asked for.



Thanks
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,429
14,141
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
In that case you recommend the DWG22C?
yes, very much so. It's an awesome motor.
I use the DWG22C on the new Gran Camino (at sea at the moment).
 

oldie1982

Finding my (electric) wheels
Jul 16, 2020
9
0
Hi guys,

Still exploring my options.

I have checked out pswpower on ali express.

With my requirements described above.

Would the following be suitable for my needs....

XF15C-Rear-48v-500W

or

SWX02 Rear Cassette

and
36V/48V 500W Brushless DC Square Wave Controller
KT LCD5

Battery would be from Insat.

Once i have an option for the above, i will add the sensors etc that i need.

If anyone has any better recommendations please do share.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
9,822
3,938
Basildon
The Bafang 48v will max out out about 20 mph and the 36v version about 22 mph. The MXUS 48V is quite fast at about 29mph, but won't be such an efficient climber as the Bafang. The 36v version around 21 mph. The two versions of the MXUS are identical. It's just the higher voltage that makes it spin faster. The 48V of the Bafang has different windings to the 36v one. They've (over) compensated for the increased battery voltage with the slower winding.

At 48v, you get 30% more torque and power compared with 36v, all other things being equal.

You should get the sinewave controller, not a square wave.
 

tushingham2

Pedelecer
May 9, 2020
89
2
thanks for reply Tried a 9 pin new front hub that gives the speed ok but 2 rear
new ones no speed reading and take down the road it shuts down
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
14,661
5,681
58
West Sx RH
thanks for reply Tried a 9 pin new front hub that gives the speed ok but 2 rear
new ones no speed reading and take down the road it shuts down
Is yours also a Woosh kit ?
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
16,429
14,141
Southend on Sea
wooshbikes.co.uk
No it’s Yosepower C500 display
tushingham2,
the Woosh kits have internal speed sensor inside the motor wheel, yours doesn't.
You will need to modify a 9-pin motor cable extension to piggyback an external speed sensor to solve this problem. Alternatively, send back the motor and ask them for one fitted with internal speed sensor.
there is a dedicated thread for Yosepower kit. Posting your problem on this thread is confusing.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
14,661
5,681
58
West Sx RH
hi have just fitted rear hub motor 9 pin and it’s not showing the speed on my display
You need to add a wheel spoke magnet & sensor.
The signal wire is connected to the controller speed hall wire, and the Gnd & 5v can pick up on any other similar wire so you can use the motor hall connection, PAS or throttle connection.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
9,822
3,938
Basildon
No need for any special piggy back connector - just splice the wires inside the controller if you have the moulded connector, otherwise splice just outside the controller where the wires are exposed. When you get a speed sensor, let us know which type for exact instructions how to fit it. You can buy ebike speed sensors or cut one off a normal cycle computer.
 

tushingham2

Pedelecer
May 9, 2020
89
2
I have fitted a new rear hub 350 watts 9 pin 36v new controller new display its runs okay no speed reading on the display. after half mile shuts down and no power battery is okay.
I disconnect the display plug fit in an isolator plug and it runs fine.
Connect it all to a front hub and all working fine with a speed reading