Rear wheel lock.

TedG

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 8, 2017
433
472
71
Lisburn Co Antrim Northern Ireland UK
For general information.
Regarding rear wheel locks.
Came across a rider whose Raleigh had been “locked” while it was (unattended and “safe”) on a train. Somebody turned the key and locked the rear wheel and removed the key. Rider stranded and having to carry a heavy bike off the train and look for help!
No spare key was supplied with the bike apparently :(

Most of you will be familiar with this locking feature no doubt but just in case, the key is in the lock at all times when the bike is being ridden. It cannot be taken out.
It is clever because it can’t fall out when the bike is being ridden which would lock the rear wheel.
The only time it can be removed is when the lock is activated and stationary.

This means when the bike is left, even if it is secured by another means, the rear wheel lock has to be activated by the owner, like it or not – otherwise it is open to abuse by someone locking it and having the key away for some sort of sadistic fun.

The rear wheel lock idea looks sound but I will appreciate learning if all these locks work in the same manner on different makes and models.
 
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sjpt

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 8, 2018
2,471
1,927
For general information.
Regarding rear wheel locks.
Came across a rider whose Raleigh had been “locked” while it was (unattended and “safe”) on a train. Somebody turned the key and locked the rear wheel and removed the key. Rider stranded and having to carry a heavy bike off the train and look for help!
No spare key was supplied with the bike apparently :(

Most of you will be familiar with this locking feature no doubt but just in case, the key is in the lock at all times when the bike is being ridden. It cannot be taken out.
It is clever because it can’t fall out when the bike is being ridden which would lock the rear wheel.
The only time it can be removed is when the lock is activated and stationary.

This means when the bike is left, even if it is secured by another means, the rear wheel lock has to be activated by the owner, like it or not – otherwise it is open to abuse by someone locking it and having the key away for some sort of sadistic fun.

The rear wheel lock idea looks sound but I will appreciate learning if all these locks work in the same manner on different makes and models.
I never use my 'nurses' lock, and have been considering removing it partly to save weight, and partly to prevent malicious use as you describe.

Mine (Raleigh Motus) does not need the key in when open, but I'm pretty sure it can be locked without the key. I must check tomorrow. In some ways it would be a better design if it needed the key to lock as well as to unlock because of your issue.

Mine has two keys, which are the same as for the locking battery (not for turning it on/off).
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
13,385
5,198
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West Sx RH
The Swizzbees have one made by Abus, I wouldn't dare think about leaving one unattended with the key left in situ.
 
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budsy

Banned
May 16, 2020
269
34
Non e bike ive had for yrs now a Raleigh Freedom 600

i received 2 x keys with it when purchased and still have them today

locks back wheel and key then is with me at all times ..would be rather silly leaving

the key in lock lol ..
 

TedG

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 8, 2017
433
472
71
Lisburn Co Antrim Northern Ireland UK
locks back wheel and key then is with me at all times ..would be rather silly leaving the key in lock lol ..
Indeed.
However when the lock is activated only then can the key be removed.

If the lock isn't activated the key is unable to be removed which is apparently what happened in this case and part of the design.
The bike was unlocked in a train carriage but out of his sight which invited a scum to turn the key, lock the wheel and remove the key.

The bike wasn't locked with the key left in place.
 
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Poolepete

Pedelecer
Aug 14, 2018
87
88
51
Poole
My Raleigh Motus GT was fitted with a Trelock ring lock and came with two keys. It is generally a feature of this type of lock that the key can only be removed when locked. I since changed the lock to an AXA Defender which is Silver Sold Secure rated, and purchased the optional plug in chain. It is a really convenient lock to use. However, when I leave the bike in higher risk areas I also employ my Gold rated D lock, which is far less user friendly.
 

Scorpio

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 13, 2020
265
106
Portugal Algarve (temporary)
I've had a couple of bikes that came with a "Nuses lock" fitted, I removed both.

1 to stop idiots locking the wheel and removing the key while the bike was unattended,

2 the lock stops anyone riding your bike away but they can still carry it away unless it's chained to a solid object. A sad tale to show why they are not to be relied on

As a deterrent in a low crime area they are a clever idea, in modern times they are a liability. Sad.
Both the ones I had, the only way to remove the key was to use the lock so you have to either lock it *every* time or risk idiots locking it and leaving you stranded with a locked bike.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
13,385
5,198
58
West Sx RH
The locks are an adequate deterrent if used in conjunction with another lock, it is logic/common sense to use any such fitted lock to prevent these events happening. All for the sake of 2 seconds to activate the lock and remove the key.
 
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DiggyGun

Finding my (electric) wheels
Mar 21, 2021
21
5
If you leave the bike unattended and out of sight, what makes you think, “I know, I’ll not lock the bike and leave it in a vulnerable condition, so that anyone can play with it”. Even though it wasn’t stolen, it was still a pretty numpty thing to do.
 

georgehenry

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2015
1,091
965
Surrey
Close Shave

During the pandemic I have been doing a lot more shopping at my local Waitrose using my old 2011 rear hub bike. This has a silverfish battery behind the seat post.

The battery is operated by a key and the bike only works with the battery turned on by said key.

I have always been a bit too blase about the protection conferred upon my bike by the rich crowd that frequent this Waitrose store located in the home counties town where I live, as well as the disheveled appearance of my bike, and got into the bad habit of leaving the key in the battery when shopping there.

However not so blase as not to use a D lock.

I have done this for around 10 years since originally getting the bike.

Anyway I guess I was due a comeuppance. A few days ago after popping in I came out and the key was gone.

I had a good look around the area where I had left the bike locked but could not see it. I was about to resign myself to riding it home unpowered, when a kid from a car parked opposite with his mum who had both obviously taken an interest in what I was looking for hoped out and picked my key up from the pavement close by where it was partially concealed by a wheelie bin and asked if I was looking for this.

Wow, that was lucky. I am now removing my key when I go shopping. It was a pretty numpty thing to have been doing anyway.
 
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Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
13,385
5,198
58
West Sx RH
As with any of these events, everything is fine until the day it actually happens and then one is stuck. Taking things for granted as it was ok previously will eventually come back to haunt.
 

TedG

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 8, 2017
433
472
71
Lisburn Co Antrim Northern Ireland UK
As per my original post, I offered to cycle home and collect my (mains powered) angle grinder with cutting disc and drive back but the station said they would not be allowed to let me use their power sockets and work on their premises.
Understandable.

The more I think about his situation, and something similar happening to other cyclists the more I think that the design should have been - key in pocket, key out, insert in lock, activate lock and remove the key. Opposite to unlock, key back in pocket and ride away.

Edit to my original post. I have just discovered that two lock keys are actually supplied with this model. :rolleyes:
 

davell

Pedelecer
Jun 6, 2017
118
49
Doncaster
My Abus rim lock works differently. It can’t be locked unless you insert the key and turn it slightly. You can’t remove the key until it is fully locked. Therefore nobody could lock the bike without the key which seems a more logical set up to me !
 
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sjpt

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 8, 2018
2,471
1,927
My Abus rim lock works differently. It can’t be locked unless you insert the key and turn it slightly. You can’t remove the key until it is fully locked. Therefore nobody could lock the bike without the key which seems a more logical set up to me !
I see mine is a Protect-O-Connect (P-O-C) from TRELOCK. I'm happy to find it works pretty much the same. (I'd never used it or looked at it in detail in the 2 years we've had the bike.)
You cannot lock or unlock without the key; you need to turn the key the full distance for either.
Also that is what TedG suggested as sensible.
 
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MichaelM

Pedelecer
Nov 14, 2020
50
34
I have a Axa Victory frame lock. It can be had in two versions, Mine is a removeable-key version. The key can be removed when it is unlocked. It has to be reinserted before the lock can be closed.
 
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GLJoe

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 21, 2017
550
256
UK
I have a Axa Victory frame lock. It can be had in two versions,
To add to this, I purchased a bike once for the wife that had one of these types of lock - I believe it was an Abus.
I was so perplexed by the fact that I couldn't take the key out unless it was in the locked position, that I had to check it wasn't faulty!
Obviously now, I know it wasn't - however I did discover there are two versions of the Abus ones as well, and with some you can take the key out anytime, and some you can't!

And all locks will come with at LEAST two keys from the factory. Dealers do irritatingly seem to lose one or more of them though and only supply the bike with one! Get your dealer to order another key or lock set if you buy a bike with only one key ( or get a £50 discount so you can do it yourself!)
 
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