Slow leak on 20” e-rear wheel

Jimo

Pedelecer
Nov 15, 2018
185
52
81
Fakenham, Norfolk
#1
The last time I repaired a puncture on a bicycle was 70+ years ago on a 26” cycle wheel, I’ve never had or messed with a Shimano or derailure system....
But have repaired many m/c tire punctures but its not the same thing is it?

Firstly my Quartz e-bike 20” folder does not want to stand inverted making life just a bit more difficult, and then there’s that chain mechanism to dismantle....
I bought the bike in November 2018 and pumped the tires to 60 psi and the bike has stood in my utility room since then, feeling the rear tire last evening I noticed it was flat........
I’m 81 with a bad back into the bargain and had two heart attacks, I hadn’t anticipated trouble this early on in ownership but I would sincerely appreciate any help (guidance) that pedaling chums may be able to offer. Thanks.

Jim
 
Aug 24, 2015
156
32
Wye Valley
#2
Sorry to read of your predicament. I also have a 20" folder and one of my dreads has been having a puncture away from home.


Don't worry - your puncture should be easy to deal with.

If it's fiddly to overturn the bike, just lay it flat on the ground, look for anything in the tyre tread which might have caused a puncture and, if so, rotate the wheel so this is easily accessible and remove it if you can using pliers. If you can't find anything then deflating your tyre, adding Slime or Goop then reinflating could fix a slow puncture.

If you have a larger puncture then there is no need to worry about the chain or rear derailleur. Just deflate the tyre, lever it off the rim in the puncture area, remove any foreign bodies in both the inner tube and inside of the tyre, add a sealing patch then lever the tyre back on and reinflate. It may also be worth adding Slime or Goop for peace of mind. One day I had a triple puncture and it sealed all three for me while out on a remote country lane.

It really isn't as difficult as you fear. Whereabouts are you? I'll happily show you if you're local.

If, however you need to remove the rear wheel and disconnect the motor, this is something I have never done and wouldn't really know where to start...
 

Jimo

Pedelecer
Nov 15, 2018
185
52
81
Fakenham, Norfolk
#3
Thanks Kangaroo I’ll try your suggestions, I’m in Fakenham,
Norfolk which is t’other side of the country - unless you’re a long distance cyclist....

Regards,
Jim
 
Aug 24, 2015
156
32
Wye Valley
#4
Norfolk would be quite a trek from Monmouthshire.

However, I'm sure you'll very soon have that puncture fixed without any difficulty along with gaining the confidence of knowing you could repair another at the roadside if ever you needed to.
 
Oct 10, 2010
122
4
Telford
#5
If you can't stand it upside down because it wobbles on the handlebars, put something under the ends of the bars to lift them up and level them.

Don't forget to check that what ever caused the puncture isn't still in the tyre.
 
Jun 20, 2018
86
37
65
Leicester
#6
Know how you feel, Jimo. I find it incredibly cumbersome trying to replace a back wheel with the bike in the upright position. Always been used to inverting the bike. Handlebar support will work ok at home, but not appropriate out on the road. Thankfully, I've not punctured on the ebike while out.
 
Nov 28, 2018
167
87
#7
I had to do my first puncture repair in 30 years on my e-bike a couple of months back.
And, like yours, it was a rear tyre. :(

It took about 40 minutes and a couple of youtube vids, but I got it done no issue.

I didn't try to take the wheel off at all. Just levered the tyre off, exposed the inner and ran it through a bucket of water till I found the hole. Checked the inside of the tyre for foreign bodies. Then patched the hole in the inner and put the inner and tyre fully back onto the wheel Then added slime and pumped it back up. All sorted.

I did however have the tyres switched out for (slimed) Marathon Touring Pluses at my first service (I had wanted them on from the outset but they weren't in stock when I bought the bike).
I find punctures no fun at all. If I liked having them, I'd have a road bike not 622/47 tyres!

A local bike shop will probably sort out a puncture for you for a few quid plus the cost of an inner by the way.
I brought my own Marathon Touring Pluses along but the charge for replacing the two tyres and sliming them (and paying for the slime) and replacing some disc brake pads (that I had accidentally oiled!) was about £25 as I recall. So for replacing an inner on one tyre I'd be surprised if they want to charge more than £10-15.
 
Last edited:

RoadieRoger

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 8, 2010
540
20
#8
Jimo wrap a sheet or large rag around the handle grips a few times and up - end the Quartz after laying it on it`s side , it will balance . Prior to this if you cannot see where the tube is leaking, half fill a flower window box with water and immerse the wheel in it ( obviously choose one without holes or gaffer tape them over ) . Watch for air bubbles and mark the nearest spoke or wrap a piece of tape around it . Use your tyre levers to prise the tyre bead off at this point and pull the Inner Tube out to inspect .
I use OKO green slime in my Batribike Quartz tubes . It kept my front tyre up for months after I noticed a slight water weep in the tread and would have for longer, but I was curious and put a small screwdriver in the hole to prise out the offender . It went down immediately , at home might I add .
My latest Ebike is a Fat Tyred Folder with 20x4in. rubber and pips for tread . I dread a puncture in these as I do in my Motorcycles . Perhaps I should practice what I preach and fill the tubes with slime ! The Ebike Supplier said no .
 

Jimo

Pedelecer
Nov 15, 2018
185
52
81
Fakenham, Norfolk
#9
Roger, thanks for the wrapping tip I must try it but first have to get repair outfit and levers, also have three scoots to get mot’d in the next month, a Honda Helix 250, Honda Lead 125 and Honda Foresight 250, my ‘52 Sunbeam S8 is exempt from mot and tax, I rode it everywhere forty years ago but in my current condition it might have become too heavy for me but along with the rest are all on the road.

Jim
 

RoadieRoger

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 8, 2010
540
20
#10
My Suzuki 250 X7 , Suzuki Roadie 50 and Aprilia Leonardo 250 are all ready to ride but these days I prefer to ride my Ebikes . These are are all different and have features I like and others less so . The Batribike Quartz has front suspension , a 200 Watt Motor , front hub drive , 20 in. wheels , is a Folder , has seat post suspension and brake blocks . The Pro Rider Flare has a Dapu mid-motor , front suspension, 700 mm wheels, seatpost suspension and brake blocks . The week old CNE SR 20a Folder has front suspension , fat tyres 20x4in., rear hub drive , fixed seatpost and mechanical disc brakes and has the front brake on the left side . You feel a bit of a Test Pilot with all these variations .
I like Folders , front suspension, smaller wheels , hub drive and the disc brakes
. I`m not so keen on the 700 mm wheels with skinny tyres and the cruising characteristics of the mid motor drive or the viscious take off which can catch you unawares in a confined space . I have a seat suspension post on order for the SR 20a after trying the one from the Quartz , a bit higher but what a difference in comfort .
Forum Posters have criticised cheaper Zoom Suspension Forks and seatpost suspension , but I wouldn`t be without them .
 

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