Wisper Wisper 905 Torque - 1000 mile review.

Phil Dryden

Pedelecer
Jun 20, 2018
230
124
70
Leicester
Purchased July 2020 with 375Wh battery
Upgrades DMR V8 pedals, Suntour NCX seat post, Giant City Connect wide saddle.
Previous ebike Cube Kathmandu.

Well, ok, its 1100 miles but we’ll not quibble. Throughout this review I may keep drawing comparisons with the Cube, but please remember that the Cube was £800 dearer!

Overall, the bike has proved to be a pleasure to own and use. Not without its little niggles, like squealing brakes, and an annoying ticking noise from the crank area. Having said that I must also say that the customer service provided by Wisper has been first class. Emails are always answered within 24 hours, often the same day, and at no point is there any impatience or exasperation evident. A local dealer could not be more attentive. Brakes were rectified by Wisper providing new discs and pads. The clicking remains, but does not in any way affect the performance of the bike - just an irksome irritation. Well documented on Electric Bike General Discussion, Nov 1 2020.

The 905 has proved to be trouble free and completely reliable. Granted its not a looker, nor did I expect it to be particularly powerful, but therein lies a strange thing. The Cube CX is a crank drive 75 nM, and the Wisper a rear hub 50nM, but the Cube did not feel 50% more powerful than the Wisper. The power delivery is more noticeable with the Cube; into Turbo and it rockets away, whereas the Wisper is definitely more gentle and gradual in its delivery. You have to work a bit harder on the hills, but then I remember the £800. Looking at my ride times, though, they are the same, if not slightly faster on the Wisper, which is weird. It may be partly because my power cuts off at 17.1 mph rather than 15.5. The torque sensor works wonderfully well - totally smooth and progressive.

Build quality is excellent, although not perhaps as well finished as the Cube (£800 extra, remember?), with some low end components like the Tourney derailleur. Again, however, it functions flawlessly and has required no maintenance or adjustment. I have found the stock cassette and chainring to provide adequate ratios. Ok, I’m in gears 5,6,and 7 90% of the time, and could probably use an extra top end gear, but its no big deal. I can ride along at 15-20mph without discomfort, and up to 23, 24mph can be easily held for shorter periods.

I frowned initially at the 1.95 bulky Kenda tyres, and vowed to swap them pretty soon, but another pleasant surprise, they roll along pretty well and I certainly don’t notice undue drag or deadness. No punctures either, so they are staying! Back light is not bad, but front one is a bit weedy. I use supplementary lights, but there is really nowhere to fix an extra USB rear light at the back, as the Suntour NCX takes out the seat post.

Handling is an area where the difference with a crank drive is very marked, probably because of the heavy back end and a high rack mounted battery (£800 remember!). You need to be a bit more alert and careful going into sharp corners as its so easy to under or over steer into them and then tricky to correct due to the gyroscopic effect of the high battery. To be fair its just a feature of this style of bike that you soon adjust to. The trickiest operation is taking the back wheel out, or more accurately getting the thing back in! The oval flat sided washers insist on moving round slightly and you can’t get the heavy wheel in, then. I will eventually get a Gaadi tube which will mean it never needs to come out! This observation would apply to all rear hub drives.

Changing brake pads is a doddle as they are top loading and can be done in the time it takes to stoop down and straighten a split pin - no need to remove the calliper as the manual indicates. Overall, then, I love my my Wisper 905 torque. A really decent build quality, trouble free, perfectly functional components, despite not all being top spec. Great ride, and a throttle to boot, although I have never used it. In fact I have taped the throttle/grip junction to avoid any possibility of water ingress! Oh, and did I mention it was £800 cheaper then the Cube? No regrets at all, very happy.

ADVICE WANTED - Has anyone any tips for reinstalling the back wheel quickly and easily? I tend always to turn the bike upside down - you do need to swivel the handlebar controller out of the way otherwise the front of the bike will rest on it, not good.

POINTS FOR WISPER -
1. The current manual on the website (905 2019-2020 model) should be checked as it indicates the handlebar unit shows time, which it doesn’t. (Para 2.1.8)
2. Might be useful to warn new users that the ODO can be inadvertently zeroed!! I lost my first 50 miles when jabbing around on the handlebar unit. Neither the manual or video warns about zeroing the ODO.
3. I think the manual should be beefed up with operating advice and tips for owners - example (don’t laugh) I have only just discovered via Utube that the brake lever rest positions can be adjusted using a small grub screw, inside each lever! Simple, but I have always ridden drop handle bikes, and had no idea about this very useful screw on flat bars.
4. The manual also refers to removing calipers to replace pads, which is not necessary. (Para 3.6.4)

For just shy of £1500, I am pretty confident the 905 Torque must be one of the best value bikes on the market at this price point. Wisper are a great company to deal with, and top marks to Adrian for his help and patience.
 

Grebacwhite

Pedelecer
Aug 9, 2020
79
59
Our new Wisper Wayfarer doesn't display the time/clock either. I think it's a necessity nowadays especially on a digital display, it's kinda something expected by most. The 905 was the bike we considered buying originally. The clicking you mention, is it constant? Our Wayfarer makes a notchy click you can actually feel through the crank arms as you pedal, it'll do it once, then after a few revolutions it'll happen again, then once more, after that it might not do it for another 10/20mins. Very strange.
 
  • Agree
Reactions: Phil Dryden

Phil Dryden

Pedelecer
Jun 20, 2018
230
124
70
Leicester
Our new Wisper Wayfarer doesn't display the time/clock either. I think it's a necessity nowadays especially on a digital display, it's kinda something expected by most. The 905 was the bike we considered buying originally. The clicking you mention, is it constant? Our Wayfarer makes a notchy click you can actually feel through the crank arms as you pedal, it'll do it once, then after a few revolutions it'll happen again, then once more, after that it might not do it for another 10/20mins. Very strange.
Yes, its a little surprising. A clock function is a standard feature on even the most basic bike computer, and opens up other functions involving time eg average speed. If you have a look at my previous post referred to above it contains a lot of detail regarding the clicking noise and the various tests and checks I have done. Its a regular click related to crank revolutions, but only under significant load. Pedals are in the clear, and I can feel nothing through the crank. I have even dismantled, cleaned, and lubed the rubber bushes in my saddle, and stripped and lubed the NCX seatpost without success. Let me know if you sort yours!
 

digger brown

Pedelecer
Dec 11, 2020
40
2
84
north lanarkshire scotland
Yes, its a little surprising. A clock function is a standard feature on even the most basic bike computer, and opens up other functions involving time eg average speed. If you have a look at my previous post referred to above it contains a lot of detail regarding the clicking noise and the various tests and checks I have done. Its a regular click related to crank revolutions, but only under significant load. Pedals are in the clear, and I can feel nothing through the crank. I have even dismantled, cleaned, and lubed the rubber bushes in my saddle, and stripped and lubed the NCX seatpost without success. Let me know if you sort yours!