Zinc electric scooter

g4ran

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Feb 12, 2024
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Hi all my daughter has a Zinc eco plus electric scooter and two of the hall sensors are damaged the part number on the sensors is 41F 930, the only hall sensors I seem to be able to find are 24v ones but the XFY Motor Controller says Voltage DC36V, the PCB that the sensors are soldered to has the number 105 on it and to purchase a PCB with three new sensors on it seem cheap enough to buy, this is my first atempt to repair a scooter so I am after some advice how do I know if the sensors on a replacement PCB are the correct ones? I have attached a photo of the motor controller in case helps, any advice would be gratfully received.
 

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saneagle

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Oct 10, 2010
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All hall sensors work at 5v on ebikes, so you need a 5v bipolar hall sensor - Honeywell SS41 or equivalent.

You need a pull-up or pull-down resistor somewhere between the controller's cpu and the hall sensor. For some ebikes/scooters, it's on the controller pcb, some have it on a pcb in the motor, and some have it combined in the sensor. If you have the PCB in the motor, you can check to see if there's one there. The dataset for the hall you remove, should say whether it includes the resistor. Whether it does or doesn't, it's not needed if the resistor is elsewhere, and a lot of controllers have them.

Note that in some motors, the middle hall sensor is reversed (flipped), so check the orientation before removing.
 
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saneagle

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Hi saneagle
Thanks for information and advice it is much appreciated.
Ask again if you have any more questions.

I forgot to mention that all controllers have a regulated 5v supply for hall sensors in the motor, pedal sensor, speed sensor and throttle, so it doesn't matter what the bike's battery voltage is.

Also, if you look at the hall sensor data sheets, they show the minimum and maximum voltages they work at. They nearly all work with a minimum of 3v, so should be fine with 5v. Likewise if they call it a 12v hall sensor, it should be OK, but check the data sheet.
 
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g4ran

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Hi saneagle, Thanks again, I have managed to purchase a new PCB with the three new sensors on it for under £7 so I am very happy, once it is delivered tomorrow I will fit it, just one question where the sensors fit into the slots should the sensors have a dab of glue on the side furthest from the motor to hold the sensors in place?
 

saneagle

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Oct 10, 2010
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Hi saneagle, Thanks again, I have managed to purchase a new PCB with the three new sensors on it for under £7 so I am very happy, once it is delivered tomorrow I will fit it, just one question where the sensors fit into the slots should the sensors have a dab of glue on the side furthest from the motor to hold the sensors in place?
I normally use a bit of silicone sealant to hold them in place so that they can't vibrate. Vibration would make the legs break sometime in the future due to metal fatigue. I've seen some epoxied in, but that makes them harder to replace if you ever have to do it again. High modulus silicone would probably be best, and put some on the legs.
 
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