Advice on e bike suitability for chronic pain/fatigue

Eagleowl

Pedelecer
Feb 5, 2019
39
9
I was looking at mobility scooters and that got me onto e-bikes, my first one had a throttle which I thought I'd need, in reality I found it more comfortable to pedal rather than just sitting there.
So my next bike didn't have a throttle and I don't miss it at all, however it sounds like in your case it will be needed along with just a cadence sensor (mines a torque sensor Bosch) I don't have fibromyalgia though or any other health issues bar ME, and importantly I was a very fit cyclist prior to developing ME almost 13 years ago now.

I love my e-bike because it allows me to cycle in the very hilly area where I live and means I can keep the effort I put in at a level that doesn't make me ill for several days afterwards, although initially you will feel the effects, and it may well make you unwell at times.

Good luck.
That is interesting and I read some of your old posts last night...glad you think that the cadence sensor option is preferable and that a throttle might also be useful too. You were/are very fit compared to me and thanks for being so honest about your health. It is very helpful being a 60kg middle ages/d?! woman! I'm sure it will take some getting used to it, like any new activity but pacing is the only way, not that I'm very good at it! I did look at my local shop in next village after a long walk but they only had Giant and Focus road bikes plus a few step through versions; not sure that they would have suited my situation and I wasn't offered the chance to try ridign them either! Thank you!
 
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Eagleowl

Pedelecer
Feb 5, 2019
39
9
I have no doubt they would save the NHS millions for people with a whole range of illnesses, the trouble would be in getting these people to actually get out there on the bike and do some exercise.

As an example my brother weighs 22 stone and my sister 24 stone, it would take some serious persuasion to get them two to change their life-time habits.
Surely being slightly active if you are still able, is better than sitting immobile in a scooter plus they are so slow...:) I agree it would be great if the NHS/DWP/gov woke up their potential but they are so slow to adopt new meds and treatment, let alone new forms of transport which are greener and more suitable for lots of different and often invisible disabilities!
 
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Eagleowl

Pedelecer
Feb 5, 2019
39
9
Some suppliers will send out a bike for you to try and send it back if it isn't for you at a reasonable cost, well at least they used to do. adding your rough location may help.
Great idea as I'm finding local dealers for Juicy, Whisper and Woosh are mostly quite far away...I would need to convince reluctant hubby to drive me out specially!
 
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Poolepete

Pedelecer
Aug 14, 2018
62
56
50
Poole
Hello! The posts above are all going to give you a good "steer".

Cycling is so good for you that I cannot think of another activity (apart from swimming perhaps) that will benefit your conditions more. My advice is to find something which is "sit up and beg" to avoid any bumps in the road being transmitted through your arms and into your neck and back. My old hybrid bike played havoc with my arthritic spine. A comfortable riding position will be extremely important for you.

Manage your expectations in the first instance. Start off gently with shorter rides of up to five miles (half an hour?) to gain your confidence and get your body used to cycling again, then start to build up as and when you feel ready.

I also advise that you speak to your doctor, just to confirm that there are no medical reasons to prohibit you from cycling.

I adore my pedelec, I hate rainy days when I am forced to drive to work. You can make it as easy or as hard as you like in terms of effort. I am sure like all these on this site, you will grow to love the freedom these machines can provide, together with the benefits of the exercise that will surely help (subject to Dr's advice) with your conditions.
 

Eagleowl

Pedelecer
Feb 5, 2019
39
9
Just looking at German scooters now.. Then for some phone calls. Thank you all so much for your kind responses- it has been brilliant!
 
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Eagleowl

Pedelecer
Feb 5, 2019
39
9
Hello! The posts above are all going to give you a good "steer".

Cycling is so good for you that I cannot think of another activity (apart from swimming perhaps) that will benefit your conditions more. My advice is to find something which is "sit up and beg" to avoid any bumps in the road being transmitted through your arms and into your neck and back. My old hybrid bike played havoc with my arthritic spine. A comfortable riding position will be extremely important for you.

Manage your expectations in the first instance. Start off gently with shorter rides of up to five miles (half an hour?) to gain your confidence and get your body used to cycling again, then start to build up as and when you feel ready.

I also advise that you speak to your doctor, just to confirm that there are no medical reasons to prohibit you from cycling.

I adore my pedelec, I hate rainy days when I am forced to drive to work. You can make it as easy or as hard as you like in terms of effort. I am sure like all these on this site, you will grow to love the freedom these machines can provide, together with the benefits of the exercise that will surely help (subject to Dr's advice) with your conditions.
Thank you! My old step through hybrid wasn't that comfortable either before I became /realised I was ill so happy to agree with you re position and replace with just the style you've mentioned. Swimming does kill me unfortunately as I love it but walking with a fitbit has helped me increase my steps much more consistently and improve my stamina gradually so I thought cycling could be next... 5 mins starting period to cycle and up!!!

Much appreciated Poolepete.
 

smifee

Pedelecer
Feb 22, 2017
50
52
71
Chandler's Ford
Great idea as I'm finding local dealers for Juicy, Whisper and Woosh are mostly quite far away...I would need to convince reluctant hubby to drive me out specially!
Depending on where you are in Hants I could ride my trike to you. It has a rear hub motor and cadence sensor so I can turn the power up and just turn the pedals, with hardly any effort, to keep the power going.
I'm not suggesting you need a trike but it would let you discover if this power system is suitable.
I'm in Chandler's Ford.
 

Eagleowl

Pedelecer
Feb 5, 2019
39
9
Depending on where you are in Hants I could ride my trike to you. It has a rear hub motor and cadence sensor so I can turn the power up and just turn the pedals, with hardly any effort, to keep the power going.
I'm not suggesting you need a trike but it would let you discover if this power system is suitable.
I'm in Chandler's Ford.
Smifee, That is really very generous and kind if you but I couldn't ask that of you. I think I'm too far from you being almost in the Meon Valley and I intend no disrepect to you. I'm happy to take your word for cadence sensors however and will need to take my time through this process step by step anyway. Thanks again for this confirmation!
 

smifee

Pedelecer
Feb 22, 2017
50
52
71
Chandler's Ford
Smifee, That is really very generous and kind if you but I couldn't ask that of you. I think I'm too far from you being almost in the Meon Valley and I intend no disrepect to you. I'm happy to take your word for cadence sensors however and will need to take my time through this process step by step anyway. Thanks again for this confirmation!
If you change your mind the distance wouldn't be a problem as I trike it to Fareham once a month, depending on the weather.
 

Laser Man

Pedelecer
Jul 1, 2018
152
97
Michelmersh SO51
This talk about mobility scooters -

I'm 68, but when I'm wooshing along on my bike I loose 50 years and at 18 I can tackle just about anything (except Cow Drove Hill).

I've not tried a mobility scooter, but I suspect that if I did, I would quickly turn into a doddery 98 year old and start writing "Outraged of Romsey" letters to The Times.
 

Artstu

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 2, 2009
2,357
895
This talk about mobility scooters -

I'm 68, but when I'm wooshing along on my bike I loose 50 years and at 18 I can tackle just about anything (except Cow Drove Hill).

I've not tried a mobility scooter, but I suspect that if I did, I would quickly turn into a doddery 98 year old and start writing "Outraged of Romsey" letters to The Times.
Mobility scooters have their place, especially for the elderly and poorly, however for some like cars they really should be used only when needed, certainly for some that will be all the time though.

That's a very short and sweet little hill and you're still a youngster at 68 I'd say https://www.strava.com/segments/1725501?filter=overall

Here's a local one at 6 times the elevation gain and steeper average https://www.strava.com/segments/808824
 
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Eagleowl

Pedelecer
Feb 5, 2019
39
9
This talk about mobility scooters -

I'm 68, but when I'm wooshing along on my bike I loose 50 years and at 18 I can tackle just about anything (except Cow Drove Hill).

This talk about mobility scooters -

I'm 68, but when I'm wooshing along on my bike I loose 50 years and at 18 I can tackle just about anything (except Cow Drove Hill).

I've not tried a mobility scooter, but I suspect that if I did, I would quickly turn into a doddery 98 year old and start writing "Outraged of Romsey" letters to The Times.


I'd love to feel like that; whooshing not doddering! What an apt word!

Made a special trip on the bus this morning to visit my local Halfords to try basic e- bikes for the very first time and first fell off simply trying to pedal (no power) a Carrera bike (with Bosch motor and battery) in the shop which was very embarrassing and painful but the bike was a bit too big for me. I tried the more comfortable looking Pendleton and first pedalled without power, then got the shock of my life after switching on the lowest eco setting! Whoosh!

Exciting but scary and I'm feeling more shaken than stirred...and got a bruised knee. I think I better wait for my osteoporosis scan results if I'm going to fall over a lot. And maybe dig out my old bike and familiarise myself with it again in my driveway before proceeding any further. I probably do have ME/ FM related balance issues and if so, even a mobility scooter probably won't be safe!

But I am so grateful to you all on the forum for your good advice and sense of humour! Thank you.
 
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Eagle

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 31, 2012
381
134
You would need to license it since:
This is no electric assist bicycle, Skoda has dispensed with cranks, chains and sprockets for a sit on and ride solution designed as an alternative to the car for the daily commute through urban areas.

The rear wheel is driven by a 4 kW hub motor for a top speed of 45 km/h (28 mph), and the removable 1,250 Wh Li-ion batteries offer up to 62 km (38.5 mi) of range per charge.
 

Eagleowl

Pedelecer
Feb 5, 2019
39
9
You would need to license it since:
This is no electric assist bicycle, Skoda has dispensed with cranks, chains and sprockets for a sit on and ride solution designed as an alternative to the car for the daily commute through urban areas.

The rear wheel is driven by a 4 kW hub motor for a top speed of 45 km/h (28 mph), and the removable 1,250 Wh Li-ion batteries offer up to 62 km (38.5 mi) of range per charge.
Yes, you are right but it might be a good alternative to a class 3 scooter...
 

Poolepete

Pedelecer
Aug 14, 2018
62
56
50
Poole
I guess it's fundamentally an electric scooter. I bet if they did choose to build it, the cost would be high as well. Also, as mentioned earlier, you would need to licence and insure the thing. I am not sure in your case that it is the thing you need. If the GP thinks it's a good idea for you to ride a bike, the exercise you are going to gradually build yourself up to doing will I am sure, reap benefits for your overall health and well-being.

A case in point for me was today. The muscles around my hip replacement have decided to complain over the last couple of days and faced with 30mph winds right into my face, I put my bike up a level of assistance and maintained a good pace (13mph) with a road biker tucked behind me in my wake! The point I'm trying to make, is that despite aches and pains, the E Bike allows me to ride when otherwise I would not. Having done a 1000 miles on it now since mid July, I really feel the benefits in terms of my fitness. I don't for one minute think you will be riding millions of miles at the get go, but by patiently and consistently building up from a gentle start, I believe you could certainly achieve your goals of freedom and independence.

Good luck! :)
 
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