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BazP

Pedelecer
Oct 8, 2017
217
103
70
Sheffield
Rightly or wrongly, whilst on a police motorcycle training course, the officer told me to use all of my side of the road and “own the road”. This may or may not apply to a cyclist but he should certainly assert his rite to be there.
 
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Deleted member 25121

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Rightly or wrongly, whilst on a police motorcycle training course, the officer told me to use all of my side of the road and “own the road”. This may or may not apply to a cyclist but he should certainly assert his rite to be there.
There's really no comparison - motorcycles can easily keep up with traffic speeds and there's rarely a need to overtake them, unlike cycles.

Do you think that horse riders should "own the road"? :) :) :)

Thought not.
 
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Amoto65

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 2, 2017
416
268
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Cheshire
Nobody "owns the road" cars/bikes/lorries/buses or horses, but all have a right to assert themselves on the road to ensure their own safety.
 
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trevor brooker

Pedelecer
Feb 11, 2018
167
82
58
maidstone
I went out this morning into town during rush hour - what a difference in attitude by the drivers to what I encounter later in the day. I did my usual pulling over & waving vehicles past - it was like I was not there, with nobody thanking me.

So I take my hat off to those bikers who do an urban commute during rush hour & your survival skills!
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
44,675
21,067
I went out this morning into town during rush hour - what a difference in attitude by the drivers to what I encounter later in the day. I did my usual pulling over & waving vehicles past - it was like I was not there, with nobody thanking me.
I think it's as much a matter of numbers though. When I walk along the busy pavements in my London borough, no-one says hello to each other. But when I walk along the 3/4 mile lane through my housing estate, encountering the occasional walker, most of us say hello with a smile, even though we are mostly complete strangers.
.
 
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Deleted member 25121

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I went out this morning into town during rush hour - what a difference in attitude by the drivers to what I encounter later in the day. I did my usual pulling over & waving vehicles past - it was like I was not there, with nobody thanking me.

So I take my hat off to those bikers who do an urban commute during rush hour & your survival skills!
You'd see exactly the same thing if you drove a car, in the rush hour road users are often in a hurry, very focussed on getting to work, there's a lot going on on the road to concentrate on, maybe they're not so happy having to go to work, they're thinking about the day ahead.......
 
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smifee

Pedelecer
Feb 22, 2017
50
52
71
Chandler's Ford
I was taught to drive cars on a 5 week course in the police. I was taught that in defensive driving ownership of a section of road is essential. It discourages inappropriate manoeuvres by other road users.
I also drove HGVs, artics & rigids, for several years. Ownership of a section of road was essential to enable certain manoeuvres.
I also rode thousands of miles on electric maxi scooters, governed to 62mph. As with cycling I found that road ownership was necessary at pinch points and roundabouts.

Now I ride an e-trike. I have a very high riding position, am rarely in a hurry to get somewhere and I give way to all & sundry. I mostly ride on cycle paths & pavements where safe to do so. But at pinch points & roundabouts I own the bit of road I need.
 
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Deleted member 25121

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Now I ride an e-trike. I have a very high riding position, am rarely in a hurry to get somewhere and I give way to all & sundry. I mostly ride on cycle paths & pavements where safe to do so. But at pinch points & roundabouts I own the bit of road I need.
A very sensible strategy showing consideration to other road and pavement users.
 
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soundwave

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 23, 2015
9,957
4,117
Nobody "owns the road"

wanna bet ;)T-90_Bhisma_cropped.jpg
 

BazP

Pedelecer
Oct 8, 2017
217
103
70
Sheffield
There's really no comparison - motorcycles can easily keep up with traffic speeds and there's rarely a need to overtake them, unlike cycles.

Do you think that horse riders should "own the road"? :) :) :)

Thought not.
I don’t know why you want my opinion on horse riders but, I think that horse riders tend to “own the road” more than cyclists. I also think that cars have a lot more consideration when passing them.
I wasn’t making any comparisons, just stating what I had been told.
 
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Deleted member 25121

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I don’t know why you want my opinion on horse riders but, I think that horse riders tend to “own the road” more than cyclists. I also think that cars have a lot more consideration when passing them.
I wasn’t making any comparisons, just stating what I had been told.
You misunderstood my point.

I my opinion "owning the road" implies occupying the full lane irrespective off other users and the speed you and they are doing.

Motorcycles are able to travel at maximum speed limits, like cars, and have every right to occupy the full lane. In doing so they "own the road" have my full respect.

Ebikes and horse aren't able to travel at maximum speed limits.

There's the big difference.

Do you get frustrated following a horse rider who's trotting along in the middle of the road? Or a cyclist who sticks to the middle of the road??

I do.
 
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MikelBikel

Pedelecer
Jun 6, 2017
235
117
Ireland
Now that tank must be over the 250w limit, and where are the pedals?
Are those lights legal, and is there still a loophole for throttles and tracked vehicles? Have you got a licence for that 100mm and can you lock it in a cabinet every night?
No number plates or rubber pads either ;-)
Cheers. Mikel
 
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nigelbb

Pedelecer
Sep 19, 2019
57
50
Who is saying that it's confrontational??

Have you ever been caught up in a queue behind a slow moving tractor on a busy road with no opportunities to overtake? A considerate tractor driver pulls over when convenient, an inconsiderate tractor driver doesn't pull over and causes lots of frustration and possible dangerous overtaking. For tractor read bicycle.

Cyclists should be aware of any traffic building up behind them and act accordingly, either pull onto the pavement if its clear or simply pull over to let the traffic past. I can't see how that's at all confrontational.
You do know that cycling on the pavement is illegal don't you?
 

Amoto65

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jul 2, 2017
416
268
57
Cheshire
Ebiker99 you probably should not be driving a motor vehicle on the road if you get so frustrated ( by your own admission), you are obviously a danger to other road users as you appear to be very confrontational as witnessed on this website.
 
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trevor brooker

Pedelecer
Feb 11, 2018
167
82
58
maidstone
I my opinion "owning the road" implies occupying the full lane irrespective of other users and the speed you and they are doing
I think that my understanding of the phrase "owning the road" takes into account other road users.
ie if riding a bike the road has potholes on the left & an island in the centre then I will occupy the middle of the lane, to stop a dangerous overtake but pull over immediately it's safe to do so.
ie if driving a van uphill & see a bike coming downhill overtaking a parked car I will ease off the throttle to allow it to safely get back.
My position would be the same irrespective of the type of vehicle I'm using or encountering or its potential speed.
 
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Deleted member 25121

Guest
Ebiker99 you probably should not be driving a motor vehicle on the road if you get so frustrated ( by your own admission), you are obviously a danger to other road users as you appear to be very confrontational as witnessed on this website.
Wot? Are you saying you've never get frustrated while driving or cycling?
 
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trevor brooker

Pedelecer
Feb 11, 2018
167
82
58
maidstone
OK, what does "owning the road" mean to you then?
That at that moment of time I have "ownership" of that piece of road in order to allow me to continue my journey.
ie the majority of my rides are on single track country lanes, where I will pull over at a layby but not into a hedge.
I don't worry if the vehicle behind can go faster & is forced to wait behind me, until its safe to allow an overtake.
The vehicle behind does not have any priority but due consideration is required as we all need to share the road.
 

BazP

Pedelecer
Oct 8, 2017
217
103
70
Sheffield
That at that moment of time I have "ownership" of that piece of road in order to allow me to continue my journey.
ie the majority of my rides are on single track country lanes, where I will pull over at a layby but not into a hedge.
I don't worry if the vehicle behind can go faster & is forced to wait behind me, until its safe to allow an overtake.
The vehicle behind does not have any priority but due consideration is required as we all need to share the road.
That is almost exactly my interpretation of " ownership of the road".
I will be in what I think is a save place to make progress and will not be bullied by cars into moving into the gutter where there is a chance of hitting a grate or catching my pedal on the curb.
My aim is not to occupy the road up to the white line, only cycling clubs do this regardless, having up to four abreast
Sometimes out of self preservation, not bullying, on a really busy road I have taken to the pavement (without pedalling furiously) but if there are a lot of side roads this presents another danger.
As an aside, I have just returned from Benidorm in Spain on a cycling holiday and there they have installed red cycling lanes along the middle of the main roads bounded with large studs that you would not want to drive over. Also there is a blanket 20kph speed limit for all traffic. Not sure if bikes are included.