Is this good technology or maybe not???

mountainsport

Esteemed Pedelecer
Feb 6, 2012
1,419
298
Hi All,

Guaranteed at one stage we have all experienced a bicycle wheel tire puncture, which does happen when we least expect it. Soon to come will be the a airless bicycle wheel tire which is also proven to be much more lighter in weight and faster on roads plus dirt tracks. There are a few of these clips on Youtube, if you are interested to find out more. To be quite frank with you I am not sure about how these are to be sold, most likely you will need to buy the whole entire wheel. For us initially, it will be expensive, BUT in the long run you will get the peace of mind that we all have been wishing for. Whatever the cost I will buy a set for the front and mainly the back.
What do you all reckon, good idea or bad idea? Including the costing aspects.

Mountainsport.
 

50 Hertz

Pedelecer
Mar 6, 2013
172
2
I think I'll stick with puncture resistant tyres such as the Marathon Plus. They have served me well.
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
52,783
30,364
No airless bicycle tyre solution has ever worked as a tyre should. The common failing is that they have the same compliance in all planes, being therefore unstable on corners or far too rigid.

A good tyre carcase design has excellent lateral stability for safety and good handling with good vertical compliance to absorb surface imperfections.

Therefore this is virtually certain to be yet another bad idea.
 

D C

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 25, 2013
1,140
575
No airless bicycle tyre solution has ever worked as a tyre should. The common failing is that they have the same compliance in all planes, being therefore unstable on corners or far too rigid.

A good tyre carcase design has excellent lateral stability for safety and good handling with good vertical compliance to absorb surface imperfections.

Therefore this is virtually certain to be yet another bad idea.
Hopefully without appearing to be too much of a Luddite I'm inclined to agree.
There's often a horror of punctures among folk fairly new to cycling but they aren't that difficult to fix with modern self stick patches and tyres that you can often remove and replace with bare hands. There's lots of informative videos on YouTube and I would advise anyone who cycles and has never repaired a puncture to do a dry run at home to practice getting the inner tube out and back in etc.
Having said that it's a rule of cycling that just as the wind is always in your face, punctures will always occur when its the most foul weather so maybe a product such as "Slime" is worth using?
Dave.
 

mountainsport

Esteemed Pedelecer
Feb 6, 2012
1,419
298
No airless bicycle tyre solution has ever worked as a tyre should. The common failing is that they have the same compliance in all planes, being therefore unstable on corners or far too rigid.

A good tyre carcase design has excellent lateral stability for safety and good handling with good vertical compliance to absorb surface imperfections.

Therefore this is virtually certain to be yet another bad idea.
And there I was telling 50 Hertz that you'll never know until you try, and your right I did not take cornering in to consideration, you need or require absorption in both wheels when cornering on rough or smooth surfaces, and that's when "AIR" comes into play.

Mountainsport
 

ghouluk

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 11, 2013
329
11
when i took my downhill bike to tubeless tyres about 10 years ago, i remember being told by a fellow rider that i was wasting my money as i'd be going to airless tyres soon, hasn't happened yet ;)

these seem to work on an "adjustable" rod system replacing the air - adjustable for different terrain and rider...not clear how adjustable or how quickly adjustable.

the thing about slingshotting is interesting though, storing the energy used against the tyre to provide momentum (wonder how well you could charge a battery with it....)

but on the other hand - i carry two tubes everywhere i go, and have only had 2 punctures in 5 years (touch wood) so i think i'll pass ;)
 

RobF

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 22, 2012
4,732
2,311
Roadies with their narrow, thin-cased tyres are always blathering on about punctures because they are always getting them.

The risk of punctures is over-stated for the likes of us who ride hybrid/mountain style bikes with wide, comparatively thick-cased tyres.

There are 2" Marathon Supremes on the Rose which, if inspected occasionally and kept properly inflated, are unlikely to puncture.

Could still happen, of course, and I do carry puncture repair stuff.

But what I don't do is worry unduly about getting one.
 

countryman663

Pedelecer
Apr 11, 2013
78
0
NWest Lake District
air free there's loads!

Hi All,

G Soon to come will be the a airless bicycle wheel tire which is also proven to be much more lighter in weight and faster on roads plus dirt tracks.....................
What do you all reckon, good idea or bad idea? Including the costing aspects.

Mountainsport.
Find myself thinking <why not? then wonder why they aren't everywhere so i think, right then let's have a look. first one I came across when your topic piqued my interest was
britek airless tires/tyres
Mountain-Bike-Energy-Return-Wheel-Britek-2-edit.jpg
BriTek’s Brilliant Airless Bicycle Tire Reinvents the Wheel Mountain Bike Energy Return Wheel Britek Tire and Rubber

then it all went bonkers! here's just some . let's have the informed and mechanically sound criticisms that you are so good at folks.
timthumb.jpg Tannus Puncture Proof Tyres

"Tire balls"559831-559833-Offroad-Pro-Tire-Ball-Kit-3 (1).jpg
michelin-protek-max.jpghttp://www.trendhunter.com/trends/michelin-protek-max
0.jpg
294_285997.jpg
am700x20a.jpghttp://www.airlesstiresnow.com/AirLyte_ep_41-1.html
and a link to a site selling a wide variety of airless and foam filled tyres so you can see prices.............Bicycle Tires Guaranteed To Never Go Flat
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
52,783
30,364
All suffering from the problem I specified above and enlarge on here. A good two-wheeler tyre carcase has considerable lateral stiffness to give reliable and stable cornering but far better vertical compliance to absorb road imperfections and ensure maximum contact area and time for safety.

That is only achieved with a multi-ply carcase, the cord and rubber layers design giving those differential characteristics. Single materials fail since they have the same compliance in the two planes, reducing safety whatever the choice of compliance and often reducing comfort. Also they cannot be varied in load bearing capability to suit the occasion and are usually very difficult to fit without rim damage.
 

mountainsport

Esteemed Pedelecer
Feb 6, 2012
1,419
298
All suffering from the problem I specified above and enlarge on here. A good two-wheeler tyre carcase has considerable lateral stiffness to give reliable and stable cornering but far better vertical compliance to absorb road imperfections and ensure maximum contact area and time for safety.

That is only achieved with a multi-ply carcase, the cord and rubber layers design giving those differential characteristics. Single materials fail since they have the same compliance in the two planes, reducing safety whatever the choice of compliance and often reducing comfort. Also they cannot be varied in load bearing capability to suit the occasion and are usually very difficult to fit without rim damage.
I've been reading up a lot about these tires and seem to be getting more negative responses far more than positive ones, so in that case a definite no no for me.

Mountainsport
 

MikeyBikey

Pedelecer
Mar 5, 2013
237
23
Speaking of Good Technology, I wondered if there was a product that added Kevlar protection in the form of a Liner?
Just had another puncture from Tottenham Diamonds, as the broken beer bottle glass is called here! :-(
No reply from Peoples Republic of Haringey re my claim for damaged Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyre that their unswept debris, etc, managed to destroy!
Slime in inner tube saved it, so I kept the tube and put Brompton yellow tyre on.
Many punctures avoided but slime has eventually run out, sugar! Going to slime new tube, and wondered about tyre liners. Usually one throws away the Kevlar protection with the old tyre, what if you could transfer it in a liner? Do Kevlar fibres break down over time? How many TPI & what gauge should the threads be?
Had a good run though :)
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
Saneagle bought some of those strips that go round the inside of the tyre. He got them from Halfords. On the first journey the sharp corners on the ends punctured both tubes, so we feathered the ends and taped them to the tyre. At the same time he changed the tubes to thicker "puncture proof" ones with slime in them. They lasted a bit longer, but while we were sitting having a pint at the pub, there was a sudden hissing noise and the tyre went down all by itself15 minutes after we stopped riding. The tape had broken and the end of the strip had punctured the tube again, so they got ceremoniously chucked in the bin.
 

flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
52,783
30,364
Inserts/liners are always in danger of creating the puncture they are meant to protect from, usually by abrasion of the tube.