Mid Drive for off trail and Hub Motor for flat commutes, true or false?

Andy-Mat

Esteemed Pedelecer
Oct 26, 2018
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Other than a means of degreasing, I have never found WD40 to be of little use for anything. I certainly know from using it on my woodworking tools and machinery (my trade) that it doesn't prevent corrosion, and doesn't act as great lubricant either. It is a brilliant product for cleaning bathroom chrome etc though.

I prefer either Triflow TFL200, Duck Oil or ACF50.
The RN used it on just about every aircraft to prevent corrosion, in the 50s through to the 90's. Thats a long time if, as you feel, it doesn't work!
We were MOST happy with the results!
But the secret will probably be in the WAY it is used, a right way and a wrong way....
You should also have a look at the WD-40 website, you can learn a lot there....
There are even better versions of WD-40 products produced in the last 25 years or so, if you have serious problems, though I have only used some of them myself.
Enjoy.
 

mike killay

Esteemed Pedelecer
Feb 17, 2011
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The RN used it on just about every aircraft to prevent corrosion, in the 50s through to the 90's. Thats a long time if, as you feel, it doesn't work!
We were MOST happy with the results!
But the secret will probably be in the WAY it is used, a right way and a wrong way....
You should also have a look at the WD-40 website, you can learn a lot there....
There are even better versions of WD-40 products produced in the last 25 years or so, if you have serious problems, though I have only used some of them myself.
Enjoy.
As far as I know, WD40 was developed to protect the aluminium outside of rockets in the 1950s
 
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Andy-Mat

Esteemed Pedelecer
Oct 26, 2018
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As far as I know, WD40 was developed to protect the aluminium outside of rockets in the 1950s
Fully correct!
It was first and foremost a corrosion inhibitor.
It also can be used to release seized or rusted components, and give them a little bit of lube, but once free, the parts must be correctly oiled or greased as WD-40 is not a lubricant in the long run.
Many forget that!
 

nabs

Pedelecer
May 27, 2019
42
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What about the riding experience?

Lets say one repalces their chain twice a year, so is not likey to break a chain. Or carries a spare. Forgetting the other issues.

Which is the better riding experience for a commute?
 

Woosh

Trade Member
May 19, 2012
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wooshbikes.co.uk
Which is the better riding experience for a commute?
I'd say hub. It's slightly lighter and requires virtually no gear change and certainly less concentration.
the only thing in favour of CD bikes is the better weight distribution. If you have to carry anything at all, that advantage goes through the window.
 
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georgehenry

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 7, 2015
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I have had three chains break on me. One on an analogue mountain bike, one on my Yamaha crank drive Haibike, and one on my £100 second hand rear hub Oxygen.

I think for road commuting with lots of starting and stopping an old fashioned rear hub cadence sensor bike with an unrestricted throttle is hard to beat and a more relaxing bike to ride. The chain sprocket and cassette will last many times longer than a crank drive. They can survive for eons of time with the odd squirt of oil on the chain and the occasional pump of air in the tyres. Even the cable disc brakes are simple to adjust, maintain and change pads on. And when it comes time to buy a new battery there is loads of choice and the prices are a fraction of the cost of a Bosch or Yamaha one. I can buy a perfectly reasonable battery and charger from Ebay for £165. One of my rear hub bikes has just such a battery that will be two years old in April and is showing no signs of dying any time soon.

I love my hard tail Haibike and if you want to ride more challenging terrain off road a crank drive is the way to go, but for simple commuting duties on the road I prefer my hub drive bikes.
 

Andy McNish

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 28, 2018
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I have a flat 12km flat commute (24 km in total).

I do it using a Bosch ALP and it's fine. The bike's original purpose was as an off road tourer and I still use it for that as well.

If I was buying a bike just for a flat commute I would think about either a hub ebike or even just a modern and light gravel or cross bike - like the £600 ones from Planet X. They will enable you to go faster and not worry about water ingress. Also you can just power wash it clean at the end of the day.

The only things you need on a flat road commute are comfort and speed. If you are relatively fit then you don't really need to use an e bike on flat roads.
 

Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
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What about the riding experience?

Lets say one repalces their chain twice a year, so is not likey to break a chain. Or carries a spare. Forgetting the other issues.

Which is the better riding experience for a commute?
I disagree with Woosh. The CD gives a fully authentic cycling experience..The faster you pedal, the faster you go . The hub is like a being on a conveyor belt.
 

Danidl

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 29, 2016
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I have a flat 12km flat commute (24 km in total).

I do it using a Bosch ALP and it's fine. The bike's original purpose was as an off road tourer and I still use it for that as well.

If I was buying a bike just for a flat commute I would think about either a hub ebike or even just a modern and light gravel or cross bike - like the £600 ones from Planet X. They will enable you to go faster and not worry about water ingress. Also you can just power wash it clean at the end of the day.

The only things you need on a flat road commute are comfort and speed. If you are relatively fit then you don't really need to use an e bike on flat roads.
.. some of us are beyond the first flush of youth. ..
 

Andy McNish

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 28, 2018
299
198
.. some of us are beyond the first flush of youth. ..
I think we all are :)
If you have serious health issues then a cadence sensing motor would tend to be best.
But if not and if your commute is genuinely flat and on tarmac (and you don't intend to dongle an ebike) then a decent non ebike is going to be cheaper and faster (and possibly less strain on your heart if you intend to spend a significant amount of time above 25kph).