Oldman here

jackhandy

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 20, 2012
1,820
323
the Cornish Alps
only a "fixie" left. I don't fancy converting that!!
That could be interesting - you'd either have to pedal or put your feet up on the bars :D

I should think the 48 volt, panasonic hub-motored Ktm erace-p would keep up with your roadie mates, but not sure if it has a throttle.
 
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Electrifying Cycles

Official Trade Member
Jun 4, 2011
1,005
176
It does not have a throttle although the assistance feels so strong in top assistance mode that it almost feels as though you do ;) Worth trying one!
 
D

Deleted member 4366

Guest
the guy is 78 with only one good leg, honestly.
You took the words right out of my mouth, Trex!

I'm sure that there are no electric bikes like Oldman wants. He will have to compromise on the looks, or buy any bike on Ebay, or wherever, that he does like, send it to Cyclezee for Ezee kit fitting (or Xipi for Xipi kit) cost £25 by Paisley freight, then get it shipped back for £35, and then he'll be able to ride round with one good leg with or without (probably with) pedal crank reducer, and live happily ever after.

Please, no more silly suggestions to confuse the issue. Unless Oldman gets a leg transplant, his criteria are: must have throttle, must have good torque, needs to look racy (reading between the lines). Only the last can be compromised. The first two are prerequisites.
 

Johnderh

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 16, 2013
14
7
Good to hear you are getting better regarding thr cancer bit , this is why i wish to buy a ebike i had cancer of the left kidney & now want to build mysef up again , just got to get myself one of those grace bikes :) or the diavelo au2bahn 45 ,,, lovely stuff
 
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Cyclezee

Guest
Many years ago, I used to commute to work from Chessington, Surrey to Queen Mary's Hospital, Roehampton in south west London by motor bike. To escape the mayhem of the A3, I used to take a shortcut through Richmond Park, peace, tranquility and lots of deer.

Frequently, I saw a chap with one leg cycling, he had some sort of counterbalance on the the pedal where there was no foot and travelled at a reasonable pace. Quite amazing, I guess mounting and dismounting was a bit of a task, but he obviously managed.
 

jackhandy

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 20, 2012
1,820
323
the Cornish Alps
You took the words right out of my mouth, Trex!

I'm sure that there are no electric bikes like Oldman wants. He will have to compromise on the looks, or buy any bike on Ebay, or wherever, that he does like, send it to Cyclezee for Ezee kit fitting (or Xipi for Xipi kit) cost £25 by Paisley freight, then get it shipped back for £35, and then he'll be able to ride round with one good leg with or without (probably with) pedal crank reducer, and live happily ever after.

Please, no more silly suggestions to confuse the issue. Unless Oldman gets a leg transplant, his criteria are: must have throttle, must have good torque, needs to look racy (reading between the lines). Only the last can be compromised. The first two are prerequisites.
What, in your vast experience, is silly about suggesting to a bloke who WANTS TO KEEP UP WITH HIS ROADIE MATES & doesn't want an old fart's bike, that he tries a bike that meets those criteria.

His age is irrelevant - and he'll never know what he needs unless he tries DIFFERENT bikes.

Pontificating & imposing unproven limitations on his choices is totally negative.

IMHO, of course.
 
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flecc

Member
Oct 25, 2006
50,464
28,351
Frequently, I saw a chap with one leg cycling, he had some sort of counterbalance on the the pedal where there was no foot and travelled at a reasonable pace. Quite amazing, I guess mounting and dismounting was a bit of a task, but he obviously managed.
A fixie perhaps, keeping the rotation going?
 

OldBob1

Esteemed Pedelecer
Oct 11, 2012
355
116
Staffordshire
I would think if oldman got on any pedelec (Step thru, folder or any) and got out there mobile again, the smile and boost it gives you may change his mind:rolleyes:

Bob
 
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Cyclezee

Guest
A fixie perhaps, keeping the rotation going?
That's a possibility Tony, it's a long time ago and the only thing that I remember is the chap having one leg. Incidentally, Richmond Park is less than mile from the Douglas Bader Rehabilitation Centre where artificial limbs are made for amputees, the centre is located within the grounds of Queen Mary's Hospital Roehampton.
 

oldman

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 16, 2013
17
0
Glyn Ceiriog N Wales
Good to hear you are getting better regarding thr cancer bit , this is why i wish to buy a ebike i had cancer of the left kidney & now want to build mysef up again , just got to get myself one of those grace bikes :) or the diavelo au2bahn 45 ,,, lovely stuff
Was chatting with one of the directors from Diavelo about the au2bahn; wonderful bike that fulfilled my needs but at £3000 was out of reach. this guy did some good power test for me; even took the chain of and used the pas, went quite fast. The Diavelo Brai Urban is a similar breed but heavier, take off all that metal work etc and it would be lighter. See Amazon for an offer price
 
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Deleted member 4366

Guest
Members Stumpi, Sad12, Davew and Alien-UK all have one leg. There's also Crotchrocket who had no muscles in one leg or something like that. A trawl through their posts might give some insight to the problems.

I just looked at Davew's introduction and see that he bought a Juicy bike that was modified with a crank-shortener by Juicyikes.
 
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Electrifying Cycles

Official Trade Member
Jun 4, 2011
1,005
176
the guy is 78 with only one good leg, honestly.
Did not know that, should have read entire thread, not the bike for him then. That will teach me to read only some of a thread ;)
 

SAD12

Pedelecer
Oct 10, 2013
43
15
Nr Bromyard, Herefds.
I just thought I'd put my opinion in here as I got a mention.

I have a full artificial leg, therefore an artificial knee. There needs to be a distinction between those who have a knee and those who haven't. I rest my leg on the pedal and work it from the hip, my 'good' leg does most of the work, hence the joy of having electrical assistance to move. I use the throttle to get going and then let the PAS pick up as I rotate the pedals. This maintains movement and balance. If someone has a knee it has to be able to be bent sufficiently to go through the rotation of the pedals. Lower limb amputees have no problem with this, or balance for the most part. There is likely to be less power through that leg but it's not impossible and much better for mounting, dismounting and stopping. Although Oldman is not there yet, this is where he is hoping to get to with his new disability, if I've read it right.

Regarding what it all looks like is a separate individual psychological issue. I've had forty years to get used to my disability and have got to the point where I don't really care what others think when I ride a step thru. Comments are made by those who think a man (read 'real man') shouldn't ride a bike like that, but if I'm having fun and it's doing what I want it to, then why should it bother me? I have drawn the line at pink or purple colours (!) And, although I've considered a trike I'm not there yet. I guess I'll get one of those when I get the cardigan with the big leather buttons! (As a side issue, I think manufacturers and retailers are missing a trick here. The baby boomer generation are here with reduced mobility but still active. And they have a few bob to spend!)

There are many videos on Youtube with one legged cyclists and for the most part they don't wear their prosthetic limbs. They probably are on fixies of one sort or another. It would help when stopping to lean against something to get off and on so that's not particularly practical on a day to day basis. To get me back into cycling I bought a cheap Cyclamatic and then realised what I wanted/needed from a bike having regained my balance. My reading of this thread suggests that the prerequisites are, a throttle to get going, a reasonable amount of assistance and an ability to be able to vary the power delivery. Depending on the physio there may be a need to reduce the rotation and there have been some good suggestions regarding that, but it's the degree of knee flex that will determine whether it's possible, and that's individual. I've not seen it anywhere, but having a fixed pedal that doesn't rotate and can be used to rest the leg on would be another thought if rotation is an issue.
 

los monty

Pedelecer
Oct 3, 2013
107
28
Hey Oldmam don't dismiss the stepthru it is the one type of bike that is overlooked by thieves. You could always put on a big motor and battery and leave the roadies in your wake.

On a more serious note I suspect your true mates will welcome you back on whatever bike you ride.
 

oldman

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 16, 2013
17
0
Glyn Ceiriog N Wales
Thank you for such an inspiring and interesting article. SAD12
My future will depend on the flexibility of the knee which I can now bend to almost 90 degrees without physio though is a little stiff, so looking forward to the "physio boot camp" as they call it :)
 
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oldman

Finding my (electric) wheels
Dec 16, 2013
17
0
Glyn Ceiriog N Wales
After browsing dozens of sites and comments I think I'm down to 2.

Powabyke MK3 X24

cyclocity Stealth or Revolver

These seem to fill my needs

Comments please
 

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
7,703
2,671
both are OK bikes.
Members tend to comment on bikes with exceptional quality (eg Optibike, BH Neos, S-pedelecs and self builds) or bikes that are exceptionally good value for money. OK bikes are OK for average weight and flat terrain, not much else to say really.
 

los monty

Pedelecer
Oct 3, 2013
107
28
After browsing dozens of sites and comments I think I'm down to 2.

Powabyke MK3 X24

cyclocity Stealth or Revolver

These seem to fill my needs

Comments please
Hi for what its worth I would go with the Revolver it is based on a reliable kit is 36v lithium and has a throttle and is a relatively light bike.

At £649 it is good value and if you need or want to change later you will not lose a great deal of money.

I have a bike built round a similar kit (8fun) and have been impressed.

If I was buying again today my two favourites would be the Revolver or the Woosh Santana the later has a bigger capacity battery and they supply cheap replacement batteries.

Whatever you choose lets hope you are back on the road soon I doubt you will regret it