Tongsheng TSDZ2 review and build tips.

Bikes4two

Esteemed Pedelecer
Feb 21, 2020
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For the cables routed under the bottom bracket any advice on clips or guides that can be mounted to the frame if they need to be re-routed?
On my bike fit I needed to remove the bottom bracket plastic cable guide - rather than re-route the rear derailleur cable, I used a short length of gear cable outer sleeve (maybe 200mm long) threaded through the small gap where the cable guide was and secured each end of it with cable ties. This was a bit fiddly but with the aid of a torch and a bit of silicon grease, job done!
 

OrdnanceAnt

Just Joined
Jul 1, 2022
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On my bike fit I needed to remove the bottom bracket plastic cable guide - rather than re-route the rear derailleur cable, I used a short length of gear cable outer sleeve (maybe 200mm long) threaded through the small gap where the cable guide was and secured each end of it with cable ties. This was a bit fiddly but with the aid of a torch and a bit of silicon grease, job done!
Thanks for the information, I was looking at a Giant Roam 3 today as a possible option. The plastic cable guide and screw could probably be reduced in height, however the hydraulic rear disc break cable is probably going to be an issue as cannot be routed over the top of the bottom bracket (see attached photos).

48035
48036
 

mr_ed

Pedelecer
Feb 15, 2022
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You can run that hydraulic hose wherever you like, it doesn’t have to come out of the bottom tube where it does. They’re easy to makeup new ones to a different length.

On my bike it runs along the underside of the top tube and then down the seat stay to the rear calliper. You could fit rivnuts or rivet p clips to the underside of the top tube to make this look neat.

Or you could drill a 6mm hole in the top/side of the bottom tube ahead of the bottom bracket and keep the hose where it is but exit from this new hole with a rubber grommet.
 

Bikes4two

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Feb 21, 2020
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  • @OrdnanceAnt - you may also find that the bottom part of the down tube where the cables exit, fouls the motor too?
  • This was the case with my friend's bike that I converted for him - basically I ground the offending metalwork back until the motor fitted
  • It was a brand new bike so I didn't have the heart to tell him I'd taken my angle grinder to it, but everything has worked out fine :D

48039:D
 
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Efuented

Finding my (electric) wheels
Oct 2, 2022
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I am about to fit a 500w 36v TSDZ2 to a 29" hard tail MTB. Will let you know how it goes. I will probably have to re-route shifter cable, as it runs below the pedaler bracket. I wanted to give some advice on the removal of the pedalier axle cassette, which can be tricky due to the significant torque that has to be applied, which requires a lot of lever which, in turn,makes it difficult to position the socket splines firmly in grooves in the nut. I bought in Ebay a socket and then used an electric impact wrench I use for the car wheel nuts. Such wrench is very effective, as it avoids the issue of the socket not getting deep enough in the grooves of the cassette nuts: you can just press hard from above and pull the trigger, and the impact wrench does all the work
 

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Bikes4two

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Feb 21, 2020
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Assuming that your bike is fitted with a standard Square Taper bottom bracket, then watch this YT clip HERE or one of the many others on the subject.

Do remember that the fixing on one side is a LEFT handed thread so it needs to be undone clockwise (I can't never remember which side - just watch YT o_O )

Personally I would never use an impact wrench for this job as it is all to easy to apply too much force and break the splines on the bottom bracket.

The gear cable guide - I had to remove the cable guide for my TSDZ2 but there was just enough room to fit a short length of gear cable outer (anchored both ends by cable ties) which I ran the gear cable inner through - this saved me having to reroute the cable.
 

Efuented

Finding my (electric) wheels
Oct 2, 2022
7
5
Many thanks for the advice and for the video. I have already removed the bracket (or cassette, as is usually called here -Spain-). I did watch a number of instruction videos before and had, fortunately, figured out the reverse thread.
Regarding the impact wrench, given the original thread comments on the difficulty of removing the bracket, having to use a G clamp to press the socket into the nut, I thought it was worth sharing a tip that worked perfectly. In my case, I soon realized, after a couple of attempts, that the use of a long ratchet wrench was not going to work that well, the issue being, precisely, that, with such a long lever and the force applied at the end of the lever, the socket would slightly tilt, so that the splines in the socket would not fit perfectly in the grooves in the bracket. Exactly what the original thread and some other members in the forum were saying. Given that the risk of either ruining the socket or (much more important), the bracket, can only be minimized by ensuring that they both fit perfectly, and given that the best way to do that is to apply downwards pressure directly above the socket to push the splines as vertically as possible into the bracket nut grooves, I thought that the impact wrench, that allows the user to simply press down while the tool does the twisting force, was the best tool for the job. Sure enough, nuts went out easily at the first attempt, which had not been the case with the ratchet wrench. Needless to say, and given that electric impact wrenches allow to modulate the number of impacts and, in some cases, the torque, I started carefully, checking that there was a very slight movement with the first impacts and that the splines and grooves were not wearing, and continued when comfortable that it was working.
 
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Efuented

Finding my (electric) wheels
Oct 2, 2022
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Assuming that your bike is fitted with a standard Square Taper bottom bracket, then watch this YT clip HERE or one of the many others on the subject.

Do remember that the fixing on one side is a LEFT handed thread so it needs to be undone clockwise (I can't never remember which side - just watch YT o_O )

Personally I would never use an impact wrench for this job as it is all to easy to apply too much force and break the splines on the bottom bracket.

The gear cable guide - I had to remove the cable guide for my TSDZ2 but there was just enough room to fit a short length of gear cable outer (anchored both ends by cable ties) which I ran the gear cable inner through - this saved me having to reroute the cable.
I will certainly try your solution to the gear cable. One question, though, Did you manage to do that without changing the cable?. I was thinking that, if I try to fit a piece of gear cable outer over the existing cable, given that the cable is already a bit deformed where it attaches to the shifter, it was going to be impossible to push it into the cable cover, as it would stick…
 
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Efuented

Finding my (electric) wheels
Oct 2, 2022
7
5
Assuming that your bike is fitted with a standard Square Taper bottom bracket, then watch this YT clip HERE or one of the many others on the subject.

Do remember that the fixing on one side is a LEFT handed thread so it needs to be undone clockwise (I can't never remember which side - just watch YT o_O )

Personally I would never use an impact wrench for this job as it is all to easy to apply too much force and break the splines on the bottom bracket.

The gear cable guide - I had to remove the cable guide for my TSDZ2 but there was just enough room to fit a short length of gear cable outer (anchored both ends by cable ties) which I ran the gear cable inner through - this saved me having to reroute the cable.
Regarding remembering to which side they twist. The rule of thumb that some internet videos provide, which works for most standard brackets, is to turn both in the same direction as the pedals turn when cycling (clockwise). That means the left side (the one on your left leg) is normal thread direction, and the right side is reverse thread direction
 
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Efuented

Finding my (electric) wheels
Oct 2, 2022
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Regarding remembering to which side they twist. The rule of thumb that some internet videos provide, which works for most standard brackets, is to turn both in the same direction as the pedals turn when cycling (clockwise). That means the left side (the one on your left leg) is normal thread direction, and the right side is reverse thread direction
I mean clockwise in the right side, anti clockwise on the left side…
 

Bikes4two

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Feb 21, 2020
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I will certainly try your solution to the gear cable.
It takes a bit of doing and you may have to jiggle (technical term o_O )the motor and outer around a bit.
One question, though, Did you manage to do that without changing the cable?. I was thinking that, if I try to fit a piece of gear cable outer over the existing cable, given that the cable is already a bit deformed where it attaches to the shifter, it was going to be impossible to push it into the cable cover, as it would stick…
That's a good point about the deformation where the cable clamps onto the rear derailleur. TBH I can't remember for sure whether I changed the whole cable or not (and I've done three conversions like that now - what a memory!) but there's a good chance that using pliers you could straighten out enough of the deformation to get the outer over it.

With regard to your use of the impact driver on the BB removal tool - I can see you're mechanical knowledge didn't need me to chip in :rolleyes:.

For those who might not have access to an impact driver, I use a crank bolt and wide steel spacer to ensure the BB tool stays squarely into the BB splines and then I use a long 1/2 inch breaker bar to undue things - hopefully the pic makes that idea clearer?
49042
 

matthewslack

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Nov 26, 2021
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My last gear cable inner cost £2.50. I'd just fit a new one.
 
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Efuented

Finding my (electric) wheels
Oct 2, 2022
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That setup with the bolt and spacer is quite neat, and, in my opinion, the only way to use a wrench with sufficient lever without risk of stripping the grooves in the bracket bolt. I would recommend anyone who cannot have access to an impact driver to go that route rather than trying to do it just by pressing manually against the bracket.
I will check if I can fit the motor (when it arrives, it is taking longer than expected...) without fiddling with the gear cables but, if the cable doesn’t fit, given the price difference, I will certainly buy a kit of cable and outer cable… Will post pictures when (hopefully when, and not if…) the motor arrives and I fit it

It takes a bit of doing and you may have to jiggle (technical term o_O )the motor and outer around a bit.

That's a good point about the deformation where the cable clamps onto the rear derailleur. TBH I can't remember for sure whether I changed the whole cable or not (and I've done three conversions like that now - what a memory!) but there's a good chance that using pliers you could straighten out enough of the deformation to get the outer over it.

With regard to your use of the impact driver on the BB removal tool - I can see you're mechanical knowledge didn't need me to chip in :rolleyes:.

For those who might not have access to an impact driver, I use a crank bolt and wide steel spacer to ensure the BB tool stays squarely into the BB splines and then I use a long 1/2 inch breaker bar to undue things - hopefully the pic makes that idea clearer?
View attachment 49042
a
It takes a bit of doing and you may have to jiggle (technical term o_O )the motor and outer around a bit.

That's a good point about the deformation where the cable clamps onto the rear derailleur. TBH I can't remember for sure whether I changed the whole cable or not (and I've done three conversions like that now - what a memory!) but there's a good chance that using pliers you could straighten out enough of the deformation to get the outer over it.

With regard to your use of the impact driver on the BB removal tool - I can see you're mechanical knowledge didn't need me to chip in :rolleyes:.

For those who might not have access to an impact driver, I use a crank bolt and wide steel spacer to ensure the BB tool stays squarely into the BB splines and then I use a long 1/2 inch breaker bar to undue things - hopefully the pic makes that idea clearer?
View attachment 49042
 
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Efuented

Finding my (electric) wheels
Oct 2, 2022
7
5
I finally did my conversion. First engine I ordered did not arrive, so I ordered another one to a different supplier once I got the refund. It's a TSDZ2 36v 350 W. I had to re-route my gear cable,as it was routed under the bottom bracket. I bought new cable and outer sleeve and routed it under the bottom tube. An issue I had is that, even though I didn't use any shims on the right side, the offset difference between the pedals was huge, with 4cm distance to the wheel arm on the right side vs 2 cm on the left side. I ordered a Bafang right crank,which has almost no offset (way less than the one that came with the TSDZ2, as you see in the last picture)a nd it's now much better, with only 2,5 cm on the right. I encourage this change,as it improves alignment of both legs when pedaling. The engine runs great and I have already posted 85Km in just two days. Next addition is a telescopic seat post,which is much safer in off-road use.
 

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Nealh

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Aug 7, 2014
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West Sx RH
I used shimano e6000 cranks for my tsdz2 , lessened the Q by 24mm.
 

Zlatan

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Nov 26, 2016
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I fitted same kit to a 24 inch wheel /youths mtb for 9 Yr old grand son. Hardest bit, as mentioned by OP was removing bottom bracket. After that quite an easy conversion.
Bike works perfect, I don't allow him to use it on roads/pavements etc (U14 rule for ebikes) but we have a great private track around SUP club lake. He loves bike... but mistake I made was leaving throttle on it. (put it on to check and set up gears etc) He doesn't need to pedal anywhere.. But hey ho.. Better than on Swytch or whatever. Made a cracking little bike.. Its more like a little trials bike for him..