Wisper Wayfarer - hard to ride

Dag1

Just Joined
May 1, 2021
4
1
Hi all,

I picked up a Wisper Wayfarer H9 today. I needed to get the bike home as it was just about to start raining so chose not to use the electrics (so the dealer didn't have to spend time explaining things).

Boy was it hard to ride, I'm used to 15 or so miles bike rides with many towing the dog (23Kg) in a trailer, normally I'm not out of breath, but during and after the ride home (around 5 miles of mainly flat roads)) I was absolutely knackered.

Checked the bike over and couldn't see anything wrong. Just been out this time using the electrics and it's the same, obviously you can feel the motor but it seems so difficult to ride, almost as though the brakes are on, which they aren't.

I've parked the bike up until Tuesday when I can speak to the dealer about it.

Is there anyone out there with a Wayfarer who could tell me how easily their bike rides. Thanks very much.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
13,120
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West Sx RH
Maybe the battery wasn't charged, any ebike is easy to ride with power.
 
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vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
8,706
3,458
Basildon
I don't understand what you said. Either the wheels spin freely or not, which you can test by lifting the bike up and spinning them by hand. If they spin freely, the bike would be the same as any bike with an additional 10kg load. It can't be harder than towing a 23kg trailer.
 
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Dag1

Just Joined
May 1, 2021
4
1
I didn't use the battery on the way home. I fully charged the battery before I eventually tried it out, on the eco setting, even though you could feel the motor, it was hard to maintain 10 MPH (on the display).

The wheels do spin free and the pedals go around easily. With no power on it is definetly harder to ride than the old bike with trailer (trailer is around 15kg + 23Kg dog). The old bike was a Raleigh Pioneer 3, with a 3 speed SRAM hub, so not exactly the best bike out there.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
8,706
3,458
Basildon
I didn't use the battery on the way home. I fully charged the battery before I eventually tried it out, on the eco setting, even though you could feel the motor, it was hard to maintain 10 MPH (on the display).

The wheels do spin free and the pedals go around easily. With no power on it is definetly harder to ride than the old bike with trailer (trailer is around 15kg + 23Kg dog). The old bike was a Raleigh Pioneer 3, with a 3 speed SRAM hub, so not exactly the best bike out there.
That's not possible. Forces obey the laws of physics. With the motor switched off, there is nothing attached to the wheels that can slow you down, and you confirmed that they spin freely. You must have been going uphill or into a strong headwind.
 

Dag1

Just Joined
May 1, 2021
4
1
I'm in Lincolnshire, in places it's almost like a billiard table and no real wind on Saturday when I picked the bike up. I'm beginning to think that the tyres have a very high rolling resistance.
 

cyclebuddy

Esteemed Pedelecer
Nov 2, 2016
570
309
Beds & Norfolk
I'm beginning to think that the tyres have a very high rolling resistance.
There once was an e-bike sold as both a hybrid/roadster, and as an alternative choice, an MTB: Same frame, same 60nm centre-drive motor, same brakes... identical in all respects except forks and tyres. Those here on the forum who bought the MTB complained of high resistance and unacceptable drag. Those who bought the roadster complained of nothing.

I bought the roadster version. 1000 miles later and still no complaints at all.

I did later swap the tyres from CST with a narrow fast rolling centre tread to Schwalbe Marathon Plus - heck, you really do notice the drag then. So yes, I'd agree, tyre resistance is a major factor in perceived resistance/drag.
 

Wisper Bikes

Trade Member
Apr 11, 2007
5,853
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Sevenoaks Kent
Hi Dag, thanks for choosing a Wisper Wayfarer. I don't understand why didn't you turn the power on, ebikes in general work perfectly in the rain and ours certainly do? The Wayfarer will be hard to ride without power, it's a heavy electric bike. I am impressed you rode it that far without power.

I am sure that the tyres will have been a part of the issue especially if they were not fully inflated. They are huge tyres, developed to soak up the bumps on the road and are chosen specifically for use with the motor.

Please let me know how you get on when you turn the power on?

All the best, David
 

Dag1

Just Joined
May 1, 2021
4
1
Thanks for all the replies.

Just been out on the bike and everything is working OK. Maybe there was some wind last Saturday which I hadn't realised, though it could have been the nap or possibly the curvature of the earth. The tyres were pumped up quite hard.

The speed control doesn't work as I expected and that was probably the problem when I first tried the electrics, I had it in ECO where the assistance runs out about 8.8 MPH, I was riding about 10 - 11 MPH, so in effect was getting no assistance.

Now I understand it a bit better, as far as I'm concerned, the bike does everything I wanted. Though it is a bit heavy, as long as there's little wind, it is relatively easy to ride without power. Just did about 6 miles and only turned the power on for the last mile or so as I could see rain coming in the distance.

In case anyone is wondering. For me the idea behind getting an E-Bike was to ride out using no electrics and then use the motor to get me home, doing it that way I should get a decent range.

David, I'm sure that the electrics / bike will be OK in the rain but I prefer not to get things wet if I can help it.

Overall I can now say that I'm made up with the bike.
 
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Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
13,120
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West Sx RH
That's why in the main we always recommend KT for there current control, you don't get the speed limits like speed control. With current control you get the same speed in all 5 Pas levels, you just use the PAS level for more or less power.
 

vfr400

Esteemed Pedelecer
Jun 12, 2011
8,706
3,458
Basildon
That's why in the main we always recommend KT for there current control, you don't get the speed limits like speed control. With current control you get the same speed in all 5 Pas levels, you just use the PAS level for more or less power.
I was thinking the same. The current control in a KT controller allows you to select level 1, which gives a constamt power just enough to overcome the weight of an ebike and a little more, regardless of speed. Riding my ebike on level 1 takes more or less the same effort to ride my non-electric road bike at similar speeds.

There are other controllers that use current control. I can't understand why it's not more widely used, as nearly everybody that tries it prefers it.
 

Tim@Wisper

Trade Member
May 6, 2021
7
0
Thanks for all the replies.

Just been out on the bike and everything is working OK. Maybe there was some wind last Saturday which I hadn't realised, though it could have been the nap or possibly the curvature of the earth. The tyres were pumped up quite hard.

The speed control doesn't work as I expected and that was probably the problem when I first tried the electrics, I had it in ECO where the assistance runs out about 8.8 MPH, I was riding about 10 - 11 MPH, so in effect was getting no assistance.

Now I understand it a bit better, as far as I'm concerned, the bike does everything I wanted. Though it is a bit heavy, as long as there's little wind, it is relatively easy to ride without power. Just did about 6 miles and only turned the power on for the last mile or so as I could see rain coming in the distance.

In case anyone is wondering. For me the idea behind getting an E-Bike was to ride out using no electrics and then use the motor to get me home, doing it that way I should get a decent range.

David, I'm sure that the electrics / bike will be OK in the rain but I prefer not to get things wet if I can help it.

Overall I can now say that I'm made up with the bike.
Great to hear you are enjoying the bike!
 

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