Yosepower hub kits.

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
11,763
4,556
57
West Sx RH
Next time it happens feel the temperature of the controller and let us know, if the controller gets very hot then your problem lays there with thermal cut out.

Also make sure motor is installed correctly with the motor cable entry face down, the cable should form a drip loop to prevent moisture entering.

Moisture can get in to the Julets so check inside the pas connection and brake connections for signs of ingress, copper streaking /tracks is a good sign. Julets are moisture resistant but not 100% proof against prolonged water spray.
 
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mags2

Pedelecer
May 20, 2018
36
2
UK
Next tome it happens feel the temperature of the controller and let us know, if the controller gets very hot then your problem lays there with thermal cut out.

Also make sure motor is installed correctly with the motor cable entry face down, the cable should form a drip loop to prevent moisture entering.

Moisture can get in to the Julets so check inside the pas connection and brake connections for signs of ingress, copper streaking /tracks is a good sign. Julets are moisture resistant but not 100% proof against prolonged water spray.
Thanks i will take another look at everything. This is the first time it's gotten real wet and it happened after only a minute or so while riding.

I did make sure the wheel cable was waterproofed and had a drip loop. The throttle connector should be fine as well.

I think the pas is the most likely issue as that seems where water can easily get in? If so how do i go about giving it extra waterproofing?
 

Olleman

Pedelecer
Jan 7, 2019
108
9
Almost had the kit for a year now and I'm up to 3000 miles. Riding in all kinds of weather but storing the bike inside.

Those few times I've ridden in temperatures below 0 degrees celcius I've experienced some problem with traction from the back wheel. The motor works fine but it feels like the chain is slipping for a revelation or two. Yesterday I had like 10 revelations pedeling with no resistence or traction whatsoever before the "gear" engaged. Since I was in PAS2 the bike still moved forward since the motor itself obviousley had traction.

I'm sorry for not being clearer but it's difficult describing this in english. I assume there's some kind of gearing involved that lets me pedel backwards without actually going backwards, but when pedeling forward one gets traction forward.

Anyone else experienced this?
 

Sturmey

Pedelecer
Jan 26, 2018
175
84
64
Ireland
Almost had the kit for a year now and I'm up to 3000 miles. Riding in all kinds of weather but storing the bike inside.

Those few times I've ridden in temperatures below 0 degrees celcius I've experienced some problem with traction from the back wheel. The motor works fine but it feels like the chain is slipping for a revelation or two. Yesterday I had like 10 revelations pedeling with no resistence or traction whatsoever before the "gear" engaged. Since I was in PAS2 the bike still moved forward since the motor itself obviousley had traction.

I'm sorry for not being clearer but it's difficult describing this in english. I assume there's some kind of gearing involved that lets me pedel backwards without actually going backwards, but when pedeling forward one gets traction forward.

Anyone else experienced this?
I (and another poster) had a similar problem with a Bafang rear hub fitted with a DNP epoch 8 speed freewheel. The electric hub worked fine but the pawls were sticking in the freewheel, resulting in no resistance or drive from the pedals. The cure was to squirt some fine oil (I used 3 in 1) into the freewheel bearing (and turn freewheel several times and squirt more so oil works its way into the pawls which is in the center of freewheel) to soften the grease that had gone hard.
I have often wondered what caused the hardening of the grease, as I never came across this with ordinary push bikes. Could it be the heat of the motor coils?

PS There is no need to take wheel off, just carefully lean bike over with the right side facing upwards.
 
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Olleman

Pedelecer
Jan 7, 2019
108
9
I (and another poster) had a similar problem with a Bafang rear hub fitted with a DNP epoch 8 speed freewheel. The electric hub worked fine but the pawls were sticking in the freewheel, resulting in no resistance or drive from the pedals. The cure was to squirt some fine oil (I used 3 in 1) into the freewheel bearing (and turn freewheel several times and squirt more so oil works its way into the pawls which is in the center of freewheel) to soften the grease that had gone hard.
I have often wondered what caused the hardening of the grease, as I never came across this with ordinary push bikes. Could it be the heat of the motor coils?

PS There is no need to take wheel off, just carefully lean bike over with the right side facing upwards.
Many thanks for the tip. I'm a bit confused as to where I should squirt the oil. Do you mean in the small room between the largest gear on the cassette and the hub housing?

If oil can penetrate "that easily" isn't that a design flaw? Considering the conditions I bike in I would imagine I have all kinds of guck in the bearing...

I have a rattling sound when the rear wheel turns freely, perhaps these two are related. I started to have this noise after just a couple of months use.
 

Sturmey

Pedelecer
Jan 26, 2018
175
84
64
Ireland
Many thanks for the tip. I'm a bit confused as to where I should squirt the oil. Do you mean in the small room between the largest gear on the cassette and the hub housing?

If oil can penetrate "that easily" isn't that a design flaw? Considering the conditions I bike in I would imagine I have all kinds of guck in the bearing...

I have a rattling sound when the rear wheel turns freely, perhaps these two are related. I started to have this noise after just a couple of months use.
Is your hub a freehub with a cassette or a screw on freewheel hub? With the screw on freewheel, you get the oil into the gap between the movable part and the fixed body of freewheel, which is on the inside of the smallest gear. On the 8 speed, this is hard to see, as the smallest 13t gear covers it slightly.
 

Olleman

Pedelecer
Jan 7, 2019
108
9
Is your hub a freehub with a cassette or a screw on freewheel hub? With the screw on freewheel, you get the oil into the gap between the movable part and the fixed body of freewheel, which is on the inside of the smallest gear. On the 8 speed, this is hard to see, as the smallest 13t gear covers it slightly.
Mine is an 8 speed cassette...
 

Sturmey

Pedelecer
Jan 26, 2018
175
84
64
Ireland
Sorry, I have no experience of cassette. But the principle is the same, i.e. there is a rachet and pawl that's part of the wheel. You can check its operation by unhooking and tying up the chain. I would check its operatiion and try to lubricate it first to see will it solve your problem, as I presume dismantling is a bit of a job.
 

Olleman

Pedelecer
Jan 7, 2019
108
9
Sorry, I have no experience of cassette. But the principle is the same, i.e. there is a rachet and pawl that's part of the wheel. You can check its operation by unhooking and tying up the chain. I would check its operatiion and try to lubricate it first to see will it solve your problem, as I presume dismantling is a bit of a job.
Ok, I'll try. Thanks again!
 

Kwozzymodo

Pedelecer
Sep 9, 2017
148
29
59
Lincolnshire
Sounds like you need to service the freehub, if the pawls are sticking. Oil or WD40 might do the trick - short term. Getting the freehub off the axle might be as simple as removing the drive-side axle bolts and pulling the freehub off, or you may need a removal tool. If you are handy with spanners, it might be worth buying the tool, or just take it to a bike shop and they will be able to do it for you.

Just to clarify the terminology - the cassette is the cluster of cogs, easy to remove. The freehub body is the shell that the cassette slides onto. Not quite as easy to remove.
 

Olleman

Pedelecer
Jan 7, 2019
108
9
Sounds like you need to service the freehub, if the pawls are sticking. Oil or WD40 might do the trick - short term. Getting the freehub off the axle might be as simple as removing the drive-side axle bolts and pulling the freehub off, or you may need a removal tool. If you are handy with spanners, it might be worth buying the tool, or just take it to a bike shop and they will be able to do it for you.

Just to clarify the terminology - the cassette is the cluster of cogs, easy to remove. The freehub body is the shell that the cassette slides onto. Not quite as easy to remove.
I've made some half serious attempts to remove the freehub with no luck in the past. I'd like to learn though, and youtube usually have the right instructions for the job :)
 

PC2017

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 19, 2017
628
78
Scunthorpe
pas properly and kept repeatedly starting and cutting out the motor
Did it start working again... I find that a little water in the PAS can effect the system, or even worse water in the controller.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
11,763
4,556
57
West Sx RH
With ebike hub motors freehub bodies that are removeable are quite simple to do, if this is not the case then it will be designed as non removable part. Point in case is the Q128c the freehub body isn't removable but a replacement side cover plate with freehub body is available, the bafang CST freehub comes off very easily.
 

Olleman

Pedelecer
Jan 7, 2019
108
9
With ebike hub motors freehub bodies that are removeable are quite simple to do, if this is not the case then it will be designed as non removable part. Point in case is the Q128c the freehub body isn't removable but a replacement side cover plate with freehub body is available, the bafang CST freehub comes off very easily.
Do you know anything about the yose hub?

I'm struggling to describe my problem to yosepower and they want a video of the problem. Because it's intermittent it's extremley difficult to catch on video. Any ideas how I can describe and/or proove the problem to them in another way? The rear wheel is still under warranty.
 
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Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
11,763
4,556
57
West Sx RH
Are you saying the bikes cassette gears do not freewheel backwards very well and they are sticking/ catching some times ?
 

Olleman

Pedelecer
Jan 7, 2019
108
9
Are you saying the bikes cassette gears do not freewheel backwards very well and they are sticking/ catching some times ?
Backwards is no problem. It's when I try to pedal forward that I don't get traction right away. Often it's only for like a half pedal stroke before I get traction again. But one time the other day I actually freewheeled forward like 10 turns. Tried to film it but when I got my phone out it started working again. This is always when the temperature is below freezing.
 

Nealh

Esteemed Pedelecer
Aug 7, 2014
11,763
4,556
57
West Sx RH
Ok thanks for clarifying, it sounds like the freehub pawls are sticking and not correctly engaging. Likely that any grease has got a bit thicker /solidified some what due to the cold weather or maybe moisture ingress has caused rusting in the area causing stiffness/sticking.
On the end of the freehub body once the cassette is removed there may be another nut or even a circlip that needs removing to allow the body to be taken off (I haven't tried on my one as have had no need to so).
As mentioned before it is possible that the end plate and freehub body are one and are inseparable like the AKM cassette hub.
The hub face plate has surface screws so it is easy to remove it to have a look from the inside of the face plate.
 
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malindowsky

Just Joined
Jan 25, 2020
2
0
Hi Everybody

This is my first post and I did read through the older posts, but cant find a clear answer to my question, so if anybody can help me out it would be greatly appriciated. BTW great community and a lot of very helpfull info for a newbie. My goal is to do a roughly 30 mile round trip commute with and average of 20MPH. My weight is 178 and I am planning to peddle not use throttle. Route is flat only one small hill. Obviouse choise would be Yose kit 36v hub with intergrated battery (36v 12.5ah 26inch wheel rear hub), as per best value (not tax vat etc.). But listed max speed is 22 mph, so first question how do I factor in my own peddaling would my max speed be over 22 mph if I work to help out the motor? I cant get my head around this if the motor spins 260-280 rpm will I still be able to peddle and add more energy?

Since there is a lot of stopping and slowing down in trafic I think I would need about 25mph max speed (also somebody mentioned the motor optimum performance is at 75%) Is 25mph max speed realisticly achievable whith this setup?

If not would overvolting to 48v with larger battery or using a 48v hub motor with 48v achieve/help my goal? If yes which is the better route full 48v system (hub battery controller), or overvolt a 36v system? Obvioulsy 48v setup is more costly and more complicated since it couldnt be all sourced from Yose.

Lastly .... I found this on ebay https://www.aliexpress.com/i/32976959578.html this is a 48v large Hailong case with integrated controller. Can I buy this and buy a 48v batterie from Yose and slip the Yose batterie (as long as both are Hailong), and have a 48v internally controlled batterie can it be this simple? The point of this is that nobody sell 48v integrated controller batteries in the EU so if I decide to go down that road and use a 48v system this could save a lot of money....... (batteries are havy so expensive shipping plus they are expensive so higher tax and vat all in all close to 50% increase over listed price)

Anyway thank you in advance for any clarifycation
 

PC2017

Esteemed Pedelecer
Sep 19, 2017
628
78
Scunthorpe
This is my first post
Hi there... Maybe best to start with a 36v system, yes you can pedal it past 20mph I usually get 18-22 pedalling, any more speed on or off motor is not all it's cracked up to be, the faster you go the more chance you hit some road debris, pop a tyre or even something even worse, I can clear 5 miles in ten mins on a windy day poss even less, check youtube there's loads of good stuff, as for replacing the internals of one battery to another, it could be done but probably not a good idea unless you have some knowledge under your belt.
 
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Kwozzymodo

Pedelecer
Sep 9, 2017
148
29
59
Lincolnshire
I can do a flat 23-mile route in 70 mins with a Q100C (328rpm) rear hub motor and a 36v/6.8ah battery. Admittedly, the battery is empty at the end of the trip. So, to avoid ‘range anxiety’, you might want a 10ah battery. So, yes, doable, probably for between £300-350 with a self-build project.