Kalkhoff Pro Connect Impulse 9 / 10 (9-G/10-G)

Tomtomato

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Apr 28, 2015
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The 603wh battery seems to be the latest version
Maybe it's a new version of the battery indeed. The Kalkhoff specification on their website is also wrong.

It's also rated 16.75Ah, as opposed to the 17Ah advertised (and as displayed on the sticker by the LEDs).

Only 1.5% lower than expected, but not the usual German precision.
 

JohnCade

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May 16, 2014
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I have absolutely no inside knowledge but there have been some problems with the 17ah batteries. I had to get mine changed, and a couple of others on this forum have too, as well as reports of problems with them on the German forum. Mine seemed to be a BMS problem so perhaps they have changed the design to deal with a known issue.
 

Tomtomato

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Apr 28, 2015
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What sort of maintenance should I do on the bike, as the manual does not cover it. Actually, the manual does not cover any maintenance at all...

Just clean and oil the chain from time to time?

How long the chain is expected to last, since it takes a major strain from the high torque motor?

Thanks,
T.
 

RobF

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Sep 22, 2012
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What sort of maintenance should I do on the bike, as the manual does not cover it. Actually, the manual does not cover any maintenance at all...

Just clean and oil the chain from time to time?

How long the chain is expected to last, since it takes a major strain from the high torque motor?

Thanks,
T.
Clean and lightly lube the chain now and again about covers it.

I try to keep an eye on general fixings tightness, so go over the bike with a multi-tool occasionaly.

That needs doing less often once everything is bedded in and nipped up.

Chain life is a harder question to answer.

I have two Bosch bikes, both with a few thousand miles done, both showing minimal wear on their original chains.

Most of my riding is in the dry on road or cycle path which is relatively kind to chains.

I ride the bikes steadily, no graunched changes or pedal stomping acceleration.

The chains are wiped clean after every ride, although I'm not convinced that does much to help wear one way or the other.

Lots of mud and grit = grinding paste, which is a problem for mountain ebikers.

Don't worry about it too much, a chain is a consumable item and a good quality one can be had for under £20.

I carry a chain breaker and a quick joining link.

Common sense suggests a snapped chain is more likely on a crank drive, but I've not heard of any.
 
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Tomtomato

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Apr 28, 2015
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I carry a chain breaker and a quick joining link.

Common sense suggests a snapped chain is more likely on a crank drive, but I've not heard of any.
Thanks Rob. I have bought a small chain breaker and quick joining link too, in case the chain snaps while I am on the road. Hopefully, this would be sufficient to go back home at reduced speed assuming I can use both items.

I am mainly concerned about the chain snapping for two reasons:

  1. One of the reviews published for the Pro Connect Impulse 9 on the 50Cycles website indicates that the chain broke at 310 miles, and again at 335 miles. Seems a very low mileage. The Pro Connect 9 should have a wider, stronger chain than the 10.
    See www.50cycles.com/electric-bikes/performance/pro_connect_impulse_9.html
  2. I am going a lot further with my electric bike than I used to with my old bike, so I am concerned about being stuck far away, and as you can tell, I am not an expert when it comes to repairing bikes
T.
 
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JohnCade

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The Lexham cycle recovery scheme is only £15 a year. So worth looking at. I keep a list of local taxi firms too since my other half doesn’t drive and can’t pick me up.

The Pro Connect is a normal bike apart from the mid motor which is usually very reliable. So any bike site will give you information on bike maintenance. Sheldon Brown and youtube are good places to start. There are many different views on chain lubrication and how long chains will last. My own opinion based on many years of riding road bikes with derailleur gear systems like yours is that dry lub is best for them and less messy than oils.

You would be having to put a lot of effort in to break a chain even with the extra power from the motor. Standing up on steep hills in a higher gear perhaps. It shouldn’t really be an issue unless you are a very strong or heavy rider.
 
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RobF

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Tomtomato

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Apr 28, 2015
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The Lexham cycle recovery scheme is only £15 a year.
Thank you! I didn't know such schemes existed. They are not very explicit on their website regarding response time and limitations. I shall check with them.

Yes, dry lubricant seems to be better suited and less messy. I shall buy some quality one.

I am neither strong nor heavy, and only cycling on pretty flat towpaths and parks, so I guess not a huge strain on the gears or chain...

My "old" hybrid unpowered bike was purchased around 8 years ago, and has a similar gear and chain. I never changed any parts, but was only doing probably less then 300 miles per year on average. It was only used on sunny week-ends...
 
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RobF

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Sep 22, 2012
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Don't forget to inspect the chain when you wipe and lube.

A chain broke on an unpowered bike belonging to a member of my cycling group - she was only cycling across a car park at the time.

Inspection showed two or three cracked sideplates, as well as the link that gave way.

The chain had obviously been like that a while, so she could have avoided the breakdown had she inspected it regularly.
 

4bound

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I had one of those cycle recovery insurance policies once when I was riding John o'groats to Land End. I broke a gear cable and tried to call them out. They said that if I could get any gear then the bike was "rideable" and so I was not covered. It didn't matter that I was 20 miles and many hills from the nearest bike shop. Now I prefer the option of keeping the number of some cab companies in my phone.
 
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Tomtomato

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Apr 28, 2015
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The creaks are just bedding in I expect. With full equipment there is a lot more stuff to make a noise than on stripped road bikes. The really irritating creaks are usually the seat post or saddle.
Having done another 15 miles today, the creaking noise is coming from the handlebar, as opposed to the suspension fork. Also, sometimes the pedals are making a clicking noise, I suspect when the gear change is not completely right. So far, no creaking noise in the seat post or saddle.

As the bike has done more than 100 miles now, I think it's due for its first service/check anyway. I believe the second one is at 500km, and then 1000km. Interestingly, the service booklet from Kalkhoff indicates that those are not free of charge, as they are "normal service intervals".

Are people getting those checks for free from the UK shops? I believe my two issues are going to be dealt with under warranty anyway (which, incidentally, would be a lot longer than the 2 years advertised, given the SOGA in England, and the price of the bike).

I have now emptied completely the battery after its first charge. The battery symbol on the LCD display showed an empty battery, but the assistance seemed to continue going for a while, although at a much lower level. I was expecting a sudden cut-off, as opposed to reduced assistance for a while.
Finally, the LCD display just switched off completely.
 
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Simo

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Mar 30, 2015
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Having done another 15 miles today, the creaking noise is coming from the handlebar, as opposed to the suspension fork. Also, sometimes the pedals are making a clicking noise, I suspect when the gear change is not completely right. So far, no creaking noise in the seat post or saddle.

As the bike has done more than 100 miles now, I think it's due for its first service/check anyway. I believe the second one is at 500km, and then 1000km. Interestingly, the service booklet from Kalkhoff indicates that those are not free of charge, as they are "normal service intervals".

Are people getting those checks for free from the UK shops? I believe my two issues are going to be dealt with under warranty anyway (which, incidentally, would be a lot longer than the 2 years advertised, given the SOGA in England, and the price of the bike).

I have now emptied completely the battery after its first charge. The battery symbol on the LCD display showed an empty battery, but the assistance seemed to continue going for a while, although at a much lower level. I was expecting a sudden cut-off, as opposed to reduced assistance for a while.
Finally, the LCD display just switched off completely.
I get a bit of a creak from the bars on mine if I push own on either grip, It annoys me too but hoping it might go away, not a big problem when I am riding as I don't notice it, I don't have a torque wrench to check the tightness on the bolts so may think about getting one.
 

oldtom

Esteemed Pedelecer
I get a bit of a creak from the bars on mine if I push own on either grip, It annoys me too but hoping it might go away, not a big problem when I am riding as I don't notice it, I don't have a torque wrench to check the tightness on the bolts so may think about getting one.
When I first rode my Kalkhoff, I too was plagued by an annoying creak which turned out to be the handlebars. After tightening the four locking bolts, I thought that had cured it but unfortunately, I had only improved the situation and I still heard some creaking form time to time.

Eventually, because it bothered me, I took the mounting apart and reseated the fulcrum. This time, I tightened the bolts more than I thought was really necessary but short of stripping threads or snapping them. I didn't have my torque wrench to hand at the time so relied solely on feel and experience. The creak has never come to my attention since.

Tom
 
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I would assume that an electric motor connected to a gear would be more efficient than one without gear,
I read somewhere that if you assume anything, you make an ass out of u and me.

If you want to know if something is true, you have to test and measure without preconceptions.

The tests and measurements that I've done show no significant difference in efficiency between the two. It's difficult to find any other objective information.

Range does not necessarily mean that a bike is efficient. A bike with a 50w controller would be able to take you over 100 miles with a 10Ah 36v battery, but your legs would be pretty tired at the end of it.

In the past (maybe 5 years ago), there is some evidence that some Chinese batteries didn't meet their capacity claims, but I don't believe that to be true now. I have a battery capacity tester and I've tested loads of batteries. New batteries nearly always meet their capacity claims very closely. I've had some that exceed them, but now, cell types are becoming standardised, so that is unusual on modern ones.
 
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Tomtomato

Esteemed Pedelecer
Apr 28, 2015
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196
I don't think I was completely wrong in my statements.

Anyway, I much prefer a crank driven bike, efficiency set aside. At least, it feels like ridding a bike, and the assistance is very progressive and well integrated into the bike.

In term of batteries, I am pretty sure the cells/components are not the same grade between a cheap Chinese bike and a German one for instance. The capacity and number of charges won't be the same. For a 17Ah battery, a slightly lower capacity does not make much difference in usage. For an entry level one (e.g. 10Ah), then it starts getting annoying.

As a test, try buying some 3,000mAh AA batteries on eBay from China, and let me know how it goes.

But no, I am not going to buy a Chinese 17Ah battery, and measure the difference with my Kalkhoff one. Very different prices, different grades of products.
 

trex

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May 15, 2011
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your xiongda has a two speed gearbox and is more efficient than the average hub motor, extending speed and torque as and when appropriate. A crank drive is not limited to just two gears, potentially more efficient than one that is connected to only two.
 

trex

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 15, 2011
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..
In term of batteries, I am pretty sure the cells/components are not the same grade between a cheap Chinese bike and a German one for instance. The capacity and number of charges won't be the same. For a 17Ah battery, a slightly lower capacity does not make much difference in usage. For an entry level one (e.g. 10Ah), then it starts getting annoying.
.
That's prejudice, the cells are made mainly by Samsung, Panasonic and Sony.
More often, people who buy expensive bikes tend to look after their bikes better than people who buy cheap bikes. Would you leave your £2k bike padlocked to a lamp post at night?
 
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Deleted member 4366

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Whether you buy a bike with a Bosch system or a Chinese battery, Panasonic, Samsung or Sony cells are the same. Not all Chinese bikes use branded cells, but their capacity claims are still accurate.
 
D

Deleted member 4366

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your xiongda has a two speed gearbox and is more efficient than the average hub motor, extending speed and torque as and when appropriate. A crank drive is not limited to just two gears, potentially more efficient than one that is connected to only two.
I've never compared with my Xiongda. The tests I did were with a Bafang BPM. For my rides, the BPM seems to use slightly less battery for a similar rider effort on the Xiongda.

I don't think that the Xiongda gives the best efficiency because it's wound for about 34 km/h in high gear, and it stays in high gear nearly all the time. Low gear is like a winch, which I only use on exceptionally steep hills. I hardly use it at all now except when I'm loaded with shopping, which hampers my pedalling. It's all uphill from the shops, so it's easier to engage low gear and throttle slowly up the hill than to try and pedal with four carrier bags to carry.
 

JohnCade

Esteemed Pedelecer
May 16, 2014
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That's prejudice, the cells are made mainly by Samsung, Panasonic and Sony.
More often, people who buy expensive bikes tend to look after their bikes better than people who buy cheap bikes. Would you leave your £2k bike padlocked to a lamp post at night?
The cells may well be the same on some of the better Chinese bikes but the quality of construction and the engineering and sophistication in the batteries is different.

I don’t think any Chinese batteries are guaranteed for two years like Kalkhoff, and many Kalkhoff batteries are still going strong after six or more years. The sleep function for instance will allow it to still be fine even if not used for a whole winter. But a Chinese battery would be dead long before that if not regularly charged.
 

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